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DNA barcoding survey of Trichoderma diversity in soil and litter of the Colombian lowland Amazonian rainforest reveals Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov. and other species.

López-Quintero CA, Atanasova L, Franco-Molano AE, Gams W, Komon-Zelazowska M, Theelen B, Müller WH, Boekhout T, Druzhinina I - Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek (2013)

Bottom Line: DNA barcoding of 107 strains based on the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and 2) of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and the partial sequence of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef1) gene revealed that the diversity of Trichoderma was dominated (71 %) by three common cosmopolitan species, namely Trichoderma harzianum sensu lato (41 %), Trichoderma spirale (17 %) and Trichoderma koningiopsis (13 %).Multigene phylogenetic analysis and phenotype profiling of four strains with an ITS1 and 2 phylotype similar to Trichoderma strigosum revealed a new sister species of the latter that is described here as Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov.Sequence similarity searches revealed that this species also occurs in soils of Malaysia and Cameroon, suggesting a pantropical distribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CBS Fungal Biodiversity Centre (CBS-KNAW), Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The diversity of Trichoderma (Hypocreales, Ascomycota) colonizing leaf litter as well as the rhizosphere of Garcinia macrophylla (Clusiaceae) was investigated in primary and secondary rain forests in Colombian Amazonia. DNA barcoding of 107 strains based on the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and 2) of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and the partial sequence of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef1) gene revealed that the diversity of Trichoderma was dominated (71 %) by three common cosmopolitan species, namely Trichoderma harzianum sensu lato (41 %), Trichoderma spirale (17 %) and Trichoderma koningiopsis (13 %). Four ITS 1 and 2 phylotypes (13 strains) could not be identified with certainty. Multigene phylogenetic analysis and phenotype profiling of four strains with an ITS1 and 2 phylotype similar to Trichoderma strigosum revealed a new sister species of the latter that is described here as Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov. Sequence similarity searches revealed that this species also occurs in soils of Malaysia and Cameroon, suggesting a pantropical distribution.

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Growth rates of Trichoderma strigosum CBS 102807 and T.strigosellum sp. nov. CBS 102817 at 33 °C
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Fig4: Growth rates of Trichoderma strigosum CBS 102807 and T.strigosellum sp. nov. CBS 102817 at 33 °C

Mentions: We applied BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArrays with FF Phenotype microplates to further test whether T. strigosellum sp. nov. and T. strigosum are physiologically similar or may be distinguished by phenotypic characters. Carbon utilization by T. strigosellum sp. nov. was rather similar to T. strigosum as both could grow on almost all tested carbon sources (Fig. 3a). M-inositol, however, is hardly utilized by T. strigosellum sp. nov. In most cases T. strigosellum sp. nov. showed better growth than T. strigosum, especially on the best utilized carbon sources, such as d-lactose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, d-maltotriose, d-raffinose, maltose, lactulose, and stachyose. For some compounds, such as d-melibiose, d-sorbitol, l-ornithine, l-threonine, l-fucose, d-saccharic acid, glycyl-l-glutamic acid, and adonitol, growth was variable (Fig. 3a), but rather strain- and not species-dependent. Thus, the largest differences in hyphal growth were observed on carbon sources such as glycerol, amygdalin, m-inositol and maltitol (Fig. 3b). This analysis further supported our above conclusion on divergence between T. strigosellum and T. strigosum. Furthermore, and in line with it, linear growth rates at 30 and 33 °C were higher for T. strigosellum sp. nov. compared to T. strigosum (Fig. 4).Fig. 3


DNA barcoding survey of Trichoderma diversity in soil and litter of the Colombian lowland Amazonian rainforest reveals Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov. and other species.

López-Quintero CA, Atanasova L, Franco-Molano AE, Gams W, Komon-Zelazowska M, Theelen B, Müller WH, Boekhout T, Druzhinina I - Antonie Van Leeuwenhoek (2013)

Growth rates of Trichoderma strigosum CBS 102807 and T.strigosellum sp. nov. CBS 102817 at 33 °C
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824238&req=5

Fig4: Growth rates of Trichoderma strigosum CBS 102807 and T.strigosellum sp. nov. CBS 102817 at 33 °C
Mentions: We applied BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArrays with FF Phenotype microplates to further test whether T. strigosellum sp. nov. and T. strigosum are physiologically similar or may be distinguished by phenotypic characters. Carbon utilization by T. strigosellum sp. nov. was rather similar to T. strigosum as both could grow on almost all tested carbon sources (Fig. 3a). M-inositol, however, is hardly utilized by T. strigosellum sp. nov. In most cases T. strigosellum sp. nov. showed better growth than T. strigosum, especially on the best utilized carbon sources, such as d-lactose, N-acetyl-d-glucosamine, d-maltotriose, d-raffinose, maltose, lactulose, and stachyose. For some compounds, such as d-melibiose, d-sorbitol, l-ornithine, l-threonine, l-fucose, d-saccharic acid, glycyl-l-glutamic acid, and adonitol, growth was variable (Fig. 3a), but rather strain- and not species-dependent. Thus, the largest differences in hyphal growth were observed on carbon sources such as glycerol, amygdalin, m-inositol and maltitol (Fig. 3b). This analysis further supported our above conclusion on divergence between T. strigosellum and T. strigosum. Furthermore, and in line with it, linear growth rates at 30 and 33 °C were higher for T. strigosellum sp. nov. compared to T. strigosum (Fig. 4).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: DNA barcoding of 107 strains based on the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and 2) of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and the partial sequence of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef1) gene revealed that the diversity of Trichoderma was dominated (71 %) by three common cosmopolitan species, namely Trichoderma harzianum sensu lato (41 %), Trichoderma spirale (17 %) and Trichoderma koningiopsis (13 %).Multigene phylogenetic analysis and phenotype profiling of four strains with an ITS1 and 2 phylotype similar to Trichoderma strigosum revealed a new sister species of the latter that is described here as Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov.Sequence similarity searches revealed that this species also occurs in soils of Malaysia and Cameroon, suggesting a pantropical distribution.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CBS Fungal Biodiversity Centre (CBS-KNAW), Utrecht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
The diversity of Trichoderma (Hypocreales, Ascomycota) colonizing leaf litter as well as the rhizosphere of Garcinia macrophylla (Clusiaceae) was investigated in primary and secondary rain forests in Colombian Amazonia. DNA barcoding of 107 strains based on the internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and 2) of the ribosomal RNA gene cluster and the partial sequence of the translation elongation factor 1 alpha (tef1) gene revealed that the diversity of Trichoderma was dominated (71 %) by three common cosmopolitan species, namely Trichoderma harzianum sensu lato (41 %), Trichoderma spirale (17 %) and Trichoderma koningiopsis (13 %). Four ITS 1 and 2 phylotypes (13 strains) could not be identified with certainty. Multigene phylogenetic analysis and phenotype profiling of four strains with an ITS1 and 2 phylotype similar to Trichoderma strigosum revealed a new sister species of the latter that is described here as Trichoderma strigosellum sp. nov. Sequence similarity searches revealed that this species also occurs in soils of Malaysia and Cameroon, suggesting a pantropical distribution.

Show MeSH