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Three-dimensional reconstruction of brain structures of the rodent Octodon degus: a brain atlas constructed by combining histological and magnetic resonance images.

Kumazawa-Manita N, Katayama M, Hashikawa T, Iriki A - Exp Brain Res (2013)

Bottom Line: Degus (Octodon degus) are rodents that are becoming more widely used in the neuroscience field.However, relatively little information is known about the anatomy of degu brains.This manuscript describes the construction of a three-dimensional (3D) volume rendered model of the degu brain that combines histological and magnetic resonance images.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Symbolic Cognitive Development, RIKEN, Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan, nkuma@brain.riken.jp.

ABSTRACT
Degus (Octodon degus) are rodents that are becoming more widely used in the neuroscience field. Degus display several more complex behaviors than rats and mice, including complicated social behaviors, vocal communications, and tool usage with superb manual dexterity. However, relatively little information is known about the anatomy of degu brains. Therefore, for these complex behaviors to be correlated with specific brain regions, a contemporary atlas of the degu brain is required. This manuscript describes the construction of a three-dimensional (3D) volume rendered model of the degu brain that combines histological and magnetic resonance images. This atlas provides several advantages, including the ability to visualize the surface of the brain from any angle. The atlas also permits virtual cutting of brain sections in any plane and provides stereotaxic coordinates for all sections, to be beneficial for both experimental surgeries and radiological studies. The reconstructed 3D atlas is freely available online at: http://brainatlas.brain.riken.jp/degu/modules/xoonips/listitem.php?index_id=24 .

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The annotated brain structures in the degu brain atlas are listed with their abbreviations and are arranged in a hierarchical organization (part 2 of 2). Each brain region was assigned a unique color. Users of the brain atlas can also search for structures by using the abbreviations
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Fig2: The annotated brain structures in the degu brain atlas are listed with their abbreviations and are arranged in a hierarchical organization (part 2 of 2). Each brain region was assigned a unique color. Users of the brain atlas can also search for structures by using the abbreviations

Mentions: The brain structures were assumed to be in the correct positions because the MR images were acquired from brains that were fixed in the skull. Finer data about the brain structures were then obtained from the Nissl-stained images because the resolutions of the Nissl-stained images (5,214 × 5,673, 72 pixels/inch) were much higher than the resolutions of the MR images (512 × 512, 72 pixels/inch). Figures 3 and 4 show representative Nissl-stained images and corresponding MR images obtained from a 22-month-old male degu (body weight: 245.0 g). In addition, the atlas also contains outlines with annotation of representative brain structures. The brain structures were delineated by referring to the published rodent (Jones 1985; Paxinos 2004), carnivores (Berman 1968; Berman and Jones 1982; Jones 1985), and primate histological descriptions (Jones 1985; Bloom et al. 1997, 1998, 1999). The fiber tracts were outlined by solid gray lines, and nuclei and cell groups were outlined by solid lines with unique colors assigned to each structure (Figs. 1, 2). Abbreviations were usually placed in the center of the structures. When this was not possible, the abbreviations were placed adjacent to the structures and the structures were indicated by lines. The outlines of the ventricles and aqueducts were made with solid colors. The previously published degu brain used Latin anatomical terms for the nomenclature (Wright and Kern 1992). By contrast, this atlas uses the English anatomical terms adopted in “The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic Coordinates” (Paxinos and Watson 2009) because this terminology is more widely used.Fig. 1


Three-dimensional reconstruction of brain structures of the rodent Octodon degus: a brain atlas constructed by combining histological and magnetic resonance images.

Kumazawa-Manita N, Katayama M, Hashikawa T, Iriki A - Exp Brain Res (2013)

The annotated brain structures in the degu brain atlas are listed with their abbreviations and are arranged in a hierarchical organization (part 2 of 2). Each brain region was assigned a unique color. Users of the brain atlas can also search for structures by using the abbreviations
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824219&req=5

Fig2: The annotated brain structures in the degu brain atlas are listed with their abbreviations and are arranged in a hierarchical organization (part 2 of 2). Each brain region was assigned a unique color. Users of the brain atlas can also search for structures by using the abbreviations
Mentions: The brain structures were assumed to be in the correct positions because the MR images were acquired from brains that were fixed in the skull. Finer data about the brain structures were then obtained from the Nissl-stained images because the resolutions of the Nissl-stained images (5,214 × 5,673, 72 pixels/inch) were much higher than the resolutions of the MR images (512 × 512, 72 pixels/inch). Figures 3 and 4 show representative Nissl-stained images and corresponding MR images obtained from a 22-month-old male degu (body weight: 245.0 g). In addition, the atlas also contains outlines with annotation of representative brain structures. The brain structures were delineated by referring to the published rodent (Jones 1985; Paxinos 2004), carnivores (Berman 1968; Berman and Jones 1982; Jones 1985), and primate histological descriptions (Jones 1985; Bloom et al. 1997, 1998, 1999). The fiber tracts were outlined by solid gray lines, and nuclei and cell groups were outlined by solid lines with unique colors assigned to each structure (Figs. 1, 2). Abbreviations were usually placed in the center of the structures. When this was not possible, the abbreviations were placed adjacent to the structures and the structures were indicated by lines. The outlines of the ventricles and aqueducts were made with solid colors. The previously published degu brain used Latin anatomical terms for the nomenclature (Wright and Kern 1992). By contrast, this atlas uses the English anatomical terms adopted in “The Rat Brain in Stereotaxic Coordinates” (Paxinos and Watson 2009) because this terminology is more widely used.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Degus (Octodon degus) are rodents that are becoming more widely used in the neuroscience field.However, relatively little information is known about the anatomy of degu brains.This manuscript describes the construction of a three-dimensional (3D) volume rendered model of the degu brain that combines histological and magnetic resonance images.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory for Symbolic Cognitive Development, RIKEN, Brain Science Institute, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198, Japan, nkuma@brain.riken.jp.

ABSTRACT
Degus (Octodon degus) are rodents that are becoming more widely used in the neuroscience field. Degus display several more complex behaviors than rats and mice, including complicated social behaviors, vocal communications, and tool usage with superb manual dexterity. However, relatively little information is known about the anatomy of degu brains. Therefore, for these complex behaviors to be correlated with specific brain regions, a contemporary atlas of the degu brain is required. This manuscript describes the construction of a three-dimensional (3D) volume rendered model of the degu brain that combines histological and magnetic resonance images. This atlas provides several advantages, including the ability to visualize the surface of the brain from any angle. The atlas also permits virtual cutting of brain sections in any plane and provides stereotaxic coordinates for all sections, to be beneficial for both experimental surgeries and radiological studies. The reconstructed 3D atlas is freely available online at: http://brainatlas.brain.riken.jp/degu/modules/xoonips/listitem.php?index_id=24 .

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus