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Elevated ground-level O3 negatively influences paddy methanogenic archaeal community.

Feng Y, Lin X, Yu Y, Zhang H, Chu H, Zhu J - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: The current knowledge regarding the effect of global climate change on rice-paddy methane (CH4) emissions is incomplete, partly because information is limited concerning the mechanism of the microbial response to elevated ground-level ozone (O3).We found that elevated ground-level O3 inhibited methanogenic activity and influenced the composition of paddy methanogenic communities, reducing the abundance and diversity of paddy methanogens by adversely affecting dominant groups, such as aceticlastic Methanosaeta, especially at the rice tillering stage.Our results indicated that continuously elevated ground-level O3 would negatively influence paddy methanogenic archaeal communities and its critical ecological function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, 210008, Jiangsu Province P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The current knowledge regarding the effect of global climate change on rice-paddy methane (CH4) emissions is incomplete, partly because information is limited concerning the mechanism of the microbial response to elevated ground-level ozone (O3). A field experiment was conducted in the China Ozone Free-Air Concentration Enrichment facility in a rice-wheat rotation system to investigate the responses of methanogenic archaeal communities to elevated ground-level O3 by culture-independent and -reliant approaches. We found that elevated ground-level O3 inhibited methanogenic activity and influenced the composition of paddy methanogenic communities, reducing the abundance and diversity of paddy methanogens by adversely affecting dominant groups, such as aceticlastic Methanosaeta, especially at the rice tillering stage. Our results indicated that continuously elevated ground-level O3 would negatively influence paddy methanogenic archaeal communities and its critical ecological function. These findings will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the responses and feedbacks of paddy ecosystems to global climate change.

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Venn diagrams comparing the OTU memberships among different soil samples.The OTU size in parenthesis under each sample name was calculated from the subset of 3,500 sequences per soil sample. The percentage of unique OTUs was reported in parenthesis.
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f4: Venn diagrams comparing the OTU memberships among different soil samples.The OTU size in parenthesis under each sample name was calculated from the subset of 3,500 sequences per soil sample. The percentage of unique OTUs was reported in parenthesis.

Mentions: To demonstrate the effects of elevated ground-level O3 on paddy methanogenic community composition, a Venn diagram and response ratios were generated to identify the changes in overall and taxa-specific OTUs. Using a subset of 3,500 sequences per sample, a Venn diagram was constructed that calculated the overlap among methanogenic assemblages in different samples. We found that 115 OTUs were shared by all the soils and respectively accounted for 33.2%, 30.7%, 31.3% and 31.8% of OTUs under elevated ground-level O3 or ambient O3 at the rice tillering and anthesis stages. Furthermore, unique OTUs for each soil sample were as follows: 114 OTUs (32.9%), 107 OTUs (28.6%), 113 OTUs (30.7%) and 90 OTUs (24.9%) (Fig. 4). At the rice tillering stage, 177 OTUs were shared and accounted for 51.2% and 47.3% of total OTUs under elevated ground-level O3 and ambient O3, respectively. At the rice anthesis stage, 196 OTUs were shared by the elevated ground-level O3 (53.3%) and the ambient O3 (54.1%). By contrast, the ambient O3 at the two rice growth stages shared 208 OTUs accounting for 55.6% (tillering) and 57.5% (anthesis) of total OTUs.


Elevated ground-level O3 negatively influences paddy methanogenic archaeal community.

Feng Y, Lin X, Yu Y, Zhang H, Chu H, Zhu J - Sci Rep (2013)

Venn diagrams comparing the OTU memberships among different soil samples.The OTU size in parenthesis under each sample name was calculated from the subset of 3,500 sequences per soil sample. The percentage of unique OTUs was reported in parenthesis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824163&req=5

f4: Venn diagrams comparing the OTU memberships among different soil samples.The OTU size in parenthesis under each sample name was calculated from the subset of 3,500 sequences per soil sample. The percentage of unique OTUs was reported in parenthesis.
Mentions: To demonstrate the effects of elevated ground-level O3 on paddy methanogenic community composition, a Venn diagram and response ratios were generated to identify the changes in overall and taxa-specific OTUs. Using a subset of 3,500 sequences per sample, a Venn diagram was constructed that calculated the overlap among methanogenic assemblages in different samples. We found that 115 OTUs were shared by all the soils and respectively accounted for 33.2%, 30.7%, 31.3% and 31.8% of OTUs under elevated ground-level O3 or ambient O3 at the rice tillering and anthesis stages. Furthermore, unique OTUs for each soil sample were as follows: 114 OTUs (32.9%), 107 OTUs (28.6%), 113 OTUs (30.7%) and 90 OTUs (24.9%) (Fig. 4). At the rice tillering stage, 177 OTUs were shared and accounted for 51.2% and 47.3% of total OTUs under elevated ground-level O3 and ambient O3, respectively. At the rice anthesis stage, 196 OTUs were shared by the elevated ground-level O3 (53.3%) and the ambient O3 (54.1%). By contrast, the ambient O3 at the two rice growth stages shared 208 OTUs accounting for 55.6% (tillering) and 57.5% (anthesis) of total OTUs.

Bottom Line: The current knowledge regarding the effect of global climate change on rice-paddy methane (CH4) emissions is incomplete, partly because information is limited concerning the mechanism of the microbial response to elevated ground-level ozone (O3).We found that elevated ground-level O3 inhibited methanogenic activity and influenced the composition of paddy methanogenic communities, reducing the abundance and diversity of paddy methanogens by adversely affecting dominant groups, such as aceticlastic Methanosaeta, especially at the rice tillering stage.Our results indicated that continuously elevated ground-level O3 would negatively influence paddy methanogenic archaeal communities and its critical ecological function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences Nanjing, 210008, Jiangsu Province P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
The current knowledge regarding the effect of global climate change on rice-paddy methane (CH4) emissions is incomplete, partly because information is limited concerning the mechanism of the microbial response to elevated ground-level ozone (O3). A field experiment was conducted in the China Ozone Free-Air Concentration Enrichment facility in a rice-wheat rotation system to investigate the responses of methanogenic archaeal communities to elevated ground-level O3 by culture-independent and -reliant approaches. We found that elevated ground-level O3 inhibited methanogenic activity and influenced the composition of paddy methanogenic communities, reducing the abundance and diversity of paddy methanogens by adversely affecting dominant groups, such as aceticlastic Methanosaeta, especially at the rice tillering stage. Our results indicated that continuously elevated ground-level O3 would negatively influence paddy methanogenic archaeal communities and its critical ecological function. These findings will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the responses and feedbacks of paddy ecosystems to global climate change.

Show MeSH