Limits...
Clive Bell's "Significant Form" and the neurobiology of aesthetics.

Zeki S - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics.In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics.I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics. In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics. I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Among the brain areas where the intensity of activity is proportional to the preferred pattern of kinetic stimuli are areas V5, seen here in a horizontal brain section (A) and the parietal cortex, shown in a sagittal section (B). The activity in V5 that correlated with the preferred ratings of these kinetic patterns also correlated with activity in the mOFC (B). From Zeki and Stutters (2012).
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Figure 4: Among the brain areas where the intensity of activity is proportional to the preferred pattern of kinetic stimuli are areas V5, seen here in a horizontal brain section (A) and the parietal cortex, shown in a sagittal section (B). The activity in V5 that correlated with the preferred ratings of these kinetic patterns also correlated with activity in the mOFC (B). From Zeki and Stutters (2012).

Mentions: Bell wrote of the “combination” of lines and colors and it is interesting to note that grouping of stimuli (which is only loosely equivalent to the combination of lines and of colors that Bell speaks of) is also processed separately in the brain. Grouping (or segmentation) is a critical process in visual recognition (Wertheimer et al., 1950/1923; Palmer, 2002). Anatomical and imaging experiments show that the processes underlying grouping for different attributes are separated within the parietal cortex. One part of the parietal cortex seems to be involved in grouping of stimuli according to color and a separate, more lateral though adjacent, part involved when they are grouped according to direction of motion (Zeki and Stutters, 2013), reflecting the anatomical arrangement of connections from V4 (color) and V5 (motion) to the parietal cortex, the input from V4 lying medially to that from V5 within parietal cortex (Shipp and Zeki, 1995; Figure 4). It seems likely that a separate but contiguous part of the parietal cortex is involved in grouping of visual signals according to form (Braddick et al., 2000). Moreover, these same but separate regions of parietal cortex appear to be involved in forming visual concepts based on color and motion (Cheadle and Zeki, 2013, submitted). Bell’s formulation thus raises the interesting, and so far un-addressed, issue of whether there is a quantitative relationship between the intensity of activity in these parietal cortex sub-divisions and aesthetically satisfying groupings of color, motion, and other visual attributes that are separately processed and whether there is any relationship between the activity produced by aesthetic groupings and activity in the mOFC.


Clive Bell's "Significant Form" and the neurobiology of aesthetics.

Zeki S - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Among the brain areas where the intensity of activity is proportional to the preferred pattern of kinetic stimuli are areas V5, seen here in a horizontal brain section (A) and the parietal cortex, shown in a sagittal section (B). The activity in V5 that correlated with the preferred ratings of these kinetic patterns also correlated with activity in the mOFC (B). From Zeki and Stutters (2012).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824150&req=5

Figure 4: Among the brain areas where the intensity of activity is proportional to the preferred pattern of kinetic stimuli are areas V5, seen here in a horizontal brain section (A) and the parietal cortex, shown in a sagittal section (B). The activity in V5 that correlated with the preferred ratings of these kinetic patterns also correlated with activity in the mOFC (B). From Zeki and Stutters (2012).
Mentions: Bell wrote of the “combination” of lines and colors and it is interesting to note that grouping of stimuli (which is only loosely equivalent to the combination of lines and of colors that Bell speaks of) is also processed separately in the brain. Grouping (or segmentation) is a critical process in visual recognition (Wertheimer et al., 1950/1923; Palmer, 2002). Anatomical and imaging experiments show that the processes underlying grouping for different attributes are separated within the parietal cortex. One part of the parietal cortex seems to be involved in grouping of stimuli according to color and a separate, more lateral though adjacent, part involved when they are grouped according to direction of motion (Zeki and Stutters, 2013), reflecting the anatomical arrangement of connections from V4 (color) and V5 (motion) to the parietal cortex, the input from V4 lying medially to that from V5 within parietal cortex (Shipp and Zeki, 1995; Figure 4). It seems likely that a separate but contiguous part of the parietal cortex is involved in grouping of visual signals according to form (Braddick et al., 2000). Moreover, these same but separate regions of parietal cortex appear to be involved in forming visual concepts based on color and motion (Cheadle and Zeki, 2013, submitted). Bell’s formulation thus raises the interesting, and so far un-addressed, issue of whether there is a quantitative relationship between the intensity of activity in these parietal cortex sub-divisions and aesthetically satisfying groupings of color, motion, and other visual attributes that are separately processed and whether there is any relationship between the activity produced by aesthetic groupings and activity in the mOFC.

Bottom Line: Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics.In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics.I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics. In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics. I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus