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Clive Bell's "Significant Form" and the neurobiology of aesthetics.

Zeki S - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Bottom Line: Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics.In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics.I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics. In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics. I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cortical activation correlating with the experience of beauty. Brain activity obtained through (A) the contrast Visually Beautiful > Visually Ugly, (B) the contrast Musically Beautiful > Musically Ugly. Panel (C) shows the results of a conjunction analysis to reveal the areas of overlap in the activity produced in the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC; circled in A and B) when subjects experienced visual beauty (red) and musical beauty (green). The zone of overlap is shown in yellow. From Ishizu and Zeki (2011).
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Figure 1: Cortical activation correlating with the experience of beauty. Brain activity obtained through (A) the contrast Visually Beautiful > Visually Ugly, (B) the contrast Musically Beautiful > Musically Ugly. Panel (C) shows the results of a conjunction analysis to reveal the areas of overlap in the activity produced in the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC; circled in A and B) when subjects experienced visual beauty (red) and musical beauty (green). The zone of overlap is shown in yellow. From Ishizu and Zeki (2011).

Mentions: Experiments which aim to determine the activity in the brain that correlates with the experience of beauty have repeatedly shown that there is one area, located interestingly in a part of the emotional brain known as the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC) of the frontal lobes (Figure 1; see Ishizu and Zeki, 2011 for a review). This area is consistently active when subjects, irrespective of race or culture, report having had an experience of the beautiful, regardless of whether the source is visual, musical, or mathematical (Ishizu and Zeki, 2011; Zeki et al., unpublished); or whether, when visual, its source is in portrait, landscape or abstract painting and, when musical, its source is in symphonic works or jazz.


Clive Bell's "Significant Form" and the neurobiology of aesthetics.

Zeki S - Front Hum Neurosci (2013)

Cortical activation correlating with the experience of beauty. Brain activity obtained through (A) the contrast Visually Beautiful > Visually Ugly, (B) the contrast Musically Beautiful > Musically Ugly. Panel (C) shows the results of a conjunction analysis to reveal the areas of overlap in the activity produced in the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC; circled in A and B) when subjects experienced visual beauty (red) and musical beauty (green). The zone of overlap is shown in yellow. From Ishizu and Zeki (2011).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824150&req=5

Figure 1: Cortical activation correlating with the experience of beauty. Brain activity obtained through (A) the contrast Visually Beautiful > Visually Ugly, (B) the contrast Musically Beautiful > Musically Ugly. Panel (C) shows the results of a conjunction analysis to reveal the areas of overlap in the activity produced in the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC; circled in A and B) when subjects experienced visual beauty (red) and musical beauty (green). The zone of overlap is shown in yellow. From Ishizu and Zeki (2011).
Mentions: Experiments which aim to determine the activity in the brain that correlates with the experience of beauty have repeatedly shown that there is one area, located interestingly in a part of the emotional brain known as the medial orbito-frontal cortex (mOFC) of the frontal lobes (Figure 1; see Ishizu and Zeki, 2011 for a review). This area is consistently active when subjects, irrespective of race or culture, report having had an experience of the beautiful, regardless of whether the source is visual, musical, or mathematical (Ishizu and Zeki, 2011; Zeki et al., unpublished); or whether, when visual, its source is in portrait, landscape or abstract painting and, when musical, its source is in symphonic works or jazz.

Bottom Line: Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics.In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics.I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wellcome Laboratory of Neurobiology, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London London, UK.

ABSTRACT
Though first published almost one century ago, and though its premise has been disputed, Clive Bell's essay on aesthetics in his book Art still provides fertile ground for discussing problems in aesthetics, especially as they relate to neuroesthetics. In this essay, I begin with a brief account of Bell's ideas on aesthetics, and describe how they focus on problems of importance to neuroesthetics. I also examine where his premise falls short, and where it provides significant insights, from a neuroesthetic and general neurobiological point of view.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus