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Understanding desiccation tolerance using the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica as a model system.

Mitra J, Xu G, Wang B, Li M, Deng X - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: B. hygrometrica is distributed widely from the tropics to northern temperate regions in East Asia and grows vigorously in areas around limestone rocks, where dehydration occurs frequently, rapidly, and profoundly.The properties of detached B. hygrometrica leaves and relative ease of culture have made it a useful system to study the adaptive mechanisms of DT.Finally a future perspective is proposed, with an emphasis on the emerging regulatory roles of retroelements and histone modifications in the acquisition of DT, and the need of establishment of genome sequence database and high throughput techniques to identify novel regulators for fully understanding of the matrix of DT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, China ; Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Assam University Silchar, India.

ABSTRACT
Vegetative tissues of Boea hygrometrica, a member of the Gesneriaceae family, can tolerate severe water loss to desiccated state and fully recover upon rehydration. Unlike many other so called "resurrection plants," the detached leaves of B. hygrometrica also possess the same level of capacity for desiccation tolerance (DT) as that of whole plant. B. hygrometrica is distributed widely from the tropics to northern temperate regions in East Asia and grows vigorously in areas around limestone rocks, where dehydration occurs frequently, rapidly, and profoundly. The properties of detached B. hygrometrica leaves and relative ease of culture have made it a useful system to study the adaptive mechanisms of DT. Extensive studies have been conducted to identify the physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying DT in the last decade, including specific responses to water stress, such as cell wall folding and pigment-protein complex stabilizing in desiccated leaves. In this review, the insight into the structural, physiological, and biochemical, and molecular alterations that accompany the acquisition of DT in B. hygrometrica is described. Finally a future perspective is proposed, with an emphasis on the emerging regulatory roles of retroelements and histone modifications in the acquisition of DT, and the need of establishment of genome sequence database and high throughput techniques to identify novel regulators for fully understanding of the matrix of DT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A plant of B. hygrometrica at desiccated and hydrated stages. B. hygrometrica plant is desiccated and shrink with a withered appearance in dry weather (A), but become hydrated again after rain (B) in the native habitat. Photographs were taken for the same plant in Beijing Botanic Garden by Dr. Haihong Shang.
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Figure 1: A plant of B. hygrometrica at desiccated and hydrated stages. B. hygrometrica plant is desiccated and shrink with a withered appearance in dry weather (A), but become hydrated again after rain (B) in the native habitat. Photographs were taken for the same plant in Beijing Botanic Garden by Dr. Haihong Shang.

Mentions: Boea hygrometrica is a small, perennial, and herbaceous plant belonging to the Gesneriaceae family. The species is distributed widely from the tropics to northern temperate regions in East Asia and grows vigorously in limestone rocks, where the soil is alkaline and calcium-rich, and dehydration occurs frequently, rapidly, and profoundly. B. hygrometrica plants are desiccated and shrink with a withered appearance in dry weather, and become hydrated again after rain in the native habitat (Figure 1). B. hygrometrica can be cultivated easily under greenhouse conditions. Seed sets with the aid of manual pollination. The seeds of B. hygrometrica are similar in size to Arabidopsis thaliana and the number of seeds in one capsule typically exceeds a hundred. The DT ability and ease of handling and maintenance has made B. hygrometrica a suitable model system to investigate molecular mechanism of DT.


Understanding desiccation tolerance using the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica as a model system.

Mitra J, Xu G, Wang B, Li M, Deng X - Front Plant Sci (2013)

A plant of B. hygrometrica at desiccated and hydrated stages. B. hygrometrica plant is desiccated and shrink with a withered appearance in dry weather (A), but become hydrated again after rain (B) in the native habitat. Photographs were taken for the same plant in Beijing Botanic Garden by Dr. Haihong Shang.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824148&req=5

Figure 1: A plant of B. hygrometrica at desiccated and hydrated stages. B. hygrometrica plant is desiccated and shrink with a withered appearance in dry weather (A), but become hydrated again after rain (B) in the native habitat. Photographs were taken for the same plant in Beijing Botanic Garden by Dr. Haihong Shang.
Mentions: Boea hygrometrica is a small, perennial, and herbaceous plant belonging to the Gesneriaceae family. The species is distributed widely from the tropics to northern temperate regions in East Asia and grows vigorously in limestone rocks, where the soil is alkaline and calcium-rich, and dehydration occurs frequently, rapidly, and profoundly. B. hygrometrica plants are desiccated and shrink with a withered appearance in dry weather, and become hydrated again after rain in the native habitat (Figure 1). B. hygrometrica can be cultivated easily under greenhouse conditions. Seed sets with the aid of manual pollination. The seeds of B. hygrometrica are similar in size to Arabidopsis thaliana and the number of seeds in one capsule typically exceeds a hundred. The DT ability and ease of handling and maintenance has made B. hygrometrica a suitable model system to investigate molecular mechanism of DT.

Bottom Line: B. hygrometrica is distributed widely from the tropics to northern temperate regions in East Asia and grows vigorously in areas around limestone rocks, where dehydration occurs frequently, rapidly, and profoundly.The properties of detached B. hygrometrica leaves and relative ease of culture have made it a useful system to study the adaptive mechanisms of DT.Finally a future perspective is proposed, with an emphasis on the emerging regulatory roles of retroelements and histone modifications in the acquisition of DT, and the need of establishment of genome sequence database and high throughput techniques to identify novel regulators for fully understanding of the matrix of DT.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Plant Resources, Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing, China ; Department of Life Science and Bioinformatics, Assam University Silchar, India.

ABSTRACT
Vegetative tissues of Boea hygrometrica, a member of the Gesneriaceae family, can tolerate severe water loss to desiccated state and fully recover upon rehydration. Unlike many other so called "resurrection plants," the detached leaves of B. hygrometrica also possess the same level of capacity for desiccation tolerance (DT) as that of whole plant. B. hygrometrica is distributed widely from the tropics to northern temperate regions in East Asia and grows vigorously in areas around limestone rocks, where dehydration occurs frequently, rapidly, and profoundly. The properties of detached B. hygrometrica leaves and relative ease of culture have made it a useful system to study the adaptive mechanisms of DT. Extensive studies have been conducted to identify the physiological, cellular, and molecular mechanisms underlying DT in the last decade, including specific responses to water stress, such as cell wall folding and pigment-protein complex stabilizing in desiccated leaves. In this review, the insight into the structural, physiological, and biochemical, and molecular alterations that accompany the acquisition of DT in B. hygrometrica is described. Finally a future perspective is proposed, with an emphasis on the emerging regulatory roles of retroelements and histone modifications in the acquisition of DT, and the need of establishment of genome sequence database and high throughput techniques to identify novel regulators for fully understanding of the matrix of DT.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus