Limits...
Being a grump only makes things worse: a transactional account of acute stress on mind wandering.

Vinski MT, Watter S - Front Psychol (2013)

Bottom Line: Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task as a measure of mind-wandering behavior.In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high-stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood.These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University Hamilton, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The current work investigates the influence of acute stress on mind wandering. Participants completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule as a measure of baseline negative mood, and were randomly assigned to either the high-stress or low-stress version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task as a measure of mind-wandering behavior. In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high-stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood. These effects diminished throughout task performance, suggesting that acute stress induces a temporary mind-wandering state in participants with a negative mood. The temporary affect-dependent deficits observed in Experiment 1 were replicated in Experiment 2, with the high negative mood participants demonstrating limited resource availability (indicated by pupil diameter) immediately following stress induction. These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean data for Experiment 2, separated by stress manipulation, negative mood group, and block. Data are shown for RTCV (reaction time coefficient of variability, calculated as reaction time standard deviation divided by the mean), error (proportion of commission errors on no-go trials), proportion of probe trials reporting off-task thought, and pupil diameter. Error bars represent standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824094&req=5

Figure 2: Mean data for Experiment 2, separated by stress manipulation, negative mood group, and block. Data are shown for RTCV (reaction time coefficient of variability, calculated as reaction time standard deviation divided by the mean), error (proportion of commission errors on no-go trials), proportion of probe trials reporting off-task thought, and pupil diameter. Error bars represent standard errors.

Mentions: Behavioral, experience sampling, and pupillometric data were analyzed using a mixed ANOVA on the within-subjects factor Block (block 1, block 2, block 3) and the between subjects factors Stress (high, low) and Negative Mood (low, high). As per Experiment 1, participants were grouped into either the high mood group (M = 24.44, SD = 2.91) or low mood group (M = 16.37, SD = 2.79) using a median-split analysis ( = 19.4). As per Experiment 1, analyses with negative affect as a continuous variable yielded the same significance of results, and therefore median-split analyses are reported only. As in Experiment 1, in addition to our omnibus analyses, we conducted a small number of directional planned comparisons, focusing on high versus low negative mood participants in the high-stress condition in block 1 data. These planned comparisons were based on a priori predictions of greater stress-mediated disruption to focused performance in high negative affect participants that are likely to diminish over time. Mean data are shown in Figure 2.


Being a grump only makes things worse: a transactional account of acute stress on mind wandering.

Vinski MT, Watter S - Front Psychol (2013)

Mean data for Experiment 2, separated by stress manipulation, negative mood group, and block. Data are shown for RTCV (reaction time coefficient of variability, calculated as reaction time standard deviation divided by the mean), error (proportion of commission errors on no-go trials), proportion of probe trials reporting off-task thought, and pupil diameter. Error bars represent standard errors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824094&req=5

Figure 2: Mean data for Experiment 2, separated by stress manipulation, negative mood group, and block. Data are shown for RTCV (reaction time coefficient of variability, calculated as reaction time standard deviation divided by the mean), error (proportion of commission errors on no-go trials), proportion of probe trials reporting off-task thought, and pupil diameter. Error bars represent standard errors.
Mentions: Behavioral, experience sampling, and pupillometric data were analyzed using a mixed ANOVA on the within-subjects factor Block (block 1, block 2, block 3) and the between subjects factors Stress (high, low) and Negative Mood (low, high). As per Experiment 1, participants were grouped into either the high mood group (M = 24.44, SD = 2.91) or low mood group (M = 16.37, SD = 2.79) using a median-split analysis ( = 19.4). As per Experiment 1, analyses with negative affect as a continuous variable yielded the same significance of results, and therefore median-split analyses are reported only. As in Experiment 1, in addition to our omnibus analyses, we conducted a small number of directional planned comparisons, focusing on high versus low negative mood participants in the high-stress condition in block 1 data. These planned comparisons were based on a priori predictions of greater stress-mediated disruption to focused performance in high negative affect participants that are likely to diminish over time. Mean data are shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task as a measure of mind-wandering behavior.In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high-stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood.These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Neuroscience and Behaviour, McMaster University Hamilton, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
The current work investigates the influence of acute stress on mind wandering. Participants completed the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule as a measure of baseline negative mood, and were randomly assigned to either the high-stress or low-stress version of the Trier Social Stress Test. Participants then completed the Sustained Attention to Response Task as a measure of mind-wandering behavior. In Experiment 1, participants reporting a high degree of negative mood that were exposed to the high-stress condition were more likely to engage in a variable response time, make more errors, and were more likely to report thinking about the stressor relative to participants that report a low level of negative mood. These effects diminished throughout task performance, suggesting that acute stress induces a temporary mind-wandering state in participants with a negative mood. The temporary affect-dependent deficits observed in Experiment 1 were replicated in Experiment 2, with the high negative mood participants demonstrating limited resource availability (indicated by pupil diameter) immediately following stress induction. These experiments provide novel evidence to suggest that acute psychosocial stress briefly suppresses the availability of cognitive resources and promotes an internally oriented focus of attention in participants with a negative mood.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus