Limits...
amoA-encoding archaea and thaumarchaeol in the lakes on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

Yang J, Jiang H, Dong H, Wang H, Wu G, Hou W, Liu W, Zhang C, Sun Y, Lai Z - Front Microbiol (2013)

Bottom Line: The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was present in hypersaline lakes with salinity up to 160 g L(-) (1).Thaumarchaeol was present in all of the studied hypersaline lakes, even in those where no AEA amoA gene was observed.Future research is needed to determine the ecological function of AEA and possible sources of thaumarchaeol in the Qinghai-Tibetan hypersaline lakes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences Wuhan, China ; Key Lab of Salt Lake Resources and Chemistry, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences Xining, China.

ABSTRACT
All known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) belong to the phylum Thaumarchaeota within the domain Archaea. AOA possess the diagnostic amoA gene (encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) and produce lipid biomarker thaumarchaeol. Although the abundance and diversity of amoA gene-encoding archaea (AEA) in freshwater lakes have been well-studied, little is known about AEA ecology in saline/hypersaline lakes. In this study, the distribution of the archaeal amoA gene and thaumarchaeol were investigated in nine Qinghai-Tibetan lakes with a salinity range from freshwater to salt-saturation (salinity: 325 g L(-) (1)). The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was present in hypersaline lakes with salinity up to 160 g L(-) (1). The archaeal amoA gene diversity in Tibetan lakes was different from those in other lakes worldwide, suggesting Tibetan lakes (high elevation, strong ultraviolet, and dry climate) may host a unique AEA population of different evolutionary origin from those in other lakes. Thaumarchaeol was present in all of the studied hypersaline lakes, even in those where no AEA amoA gene was observed. Future research is needed to determine the ecological function of AEA and possible sources of thaumarchaeol in the Qinghai-Tibetan hypersaline lakes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Jaccard similarity-based cluster analysis of the amoA gene communities in different lakes worldwide. The archaeal amoA gene sequences obtained in this study were combined with those previously reported for Qinghai Lake (Jiang et al., 2009b), Lake Taihu (Wu et al., 2010), high arctic lake (Pouliot et al., 2009), Lake Kivu (Llirós et al., 2010), Spanish lakes (Auguet et al., 2011), and Danish lakes (Herrmann et al., 2009). The numbers of clones from each location are given in Table 1. “W” and “S” indicate water and sediment samples, respectively.
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Figure 6: Jaccard similarity-based cluster analysis of the amoA gene communities in different lakes worldwide. The archaeal amoA gene sequences obtained in this study were combined with those previously reported for Qinghai Lake (Jiang et al., 2009b), Lake Taihu (Wu et al., 2010), high arctic lake (Pouliot et al., 2009), Lake Kivu (Llirós et al., 2010), Spanish lakes (Auguet et al., 2011), and Danish lakes (Herrmann et al., 2009). The numbers of clones from each location are given in Table 1. “W” and “S” indicate water and sediment samples, respectively.

Mentions: Cluster analysis showed that the AEA communities in the lakes (including the saline/hypersaline lakes in this study and the freshwater lakes in other studies) within China were grouped into one cluster, separated from other freshwater lakes (except for the high Arctic Lake C1) around the world (e.g., Canada, Congo, Spain, Denmark; Figure 6). In addition, the AEA communities in Tibetan lakes exhibited little similarity to those in other saline habitats, such as the waters of Monterey Bay, the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, the Black Sea, Arctic Ocean, and Antarctic coasts (Figure 7A) and sediment samples from Elkhorn Slough, and Huntington Beach of California, Bahïa del Tbóari of Mexico, San Francisco Bay, and the tropical West Pacific Continental Margin and a Oak Ridge soil (Figure 7B).


amoA-encoding archaea and thaumarchaeol in the lakes on the northeastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

Yang J, Jiang H, Dong H, Wang H, Wu G, Hou W, Liu W, Zhang C, Sun Y, Lai Z - Front Microbiol (2013)

Jaccard similarity-based cluster analysis of the amoA gene communities in different lakes worldwide. The archaeal amoA gene sequences obtained in this study were combined with those previously reported for Qinghai Lake (Jiang et al., 2009b), Lake Taihu (Wu et al., 2010), high arctic lake (Pouliot et al., 2009), Lake Kivu (Llirós et al., 2010), Spanish lakes (Auguet et al., 2011), and Danish lakes (Herrmann et al., 2009). The numbers of clones from each location are given in Table 1. “W” and “S” indicate water and sediment samples, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824093&req=5

Figure 6: Jaccard similarity-based cluster analysis of the amoA gene communities in different lakes worldwide. The archaeal amoA gene sequences obtained in this study were combined with those previously reported for Qinghai Lake (Jiang et al., 2009b), Lake Taihu (Wu et al., 2010), high arctic lake (Pouliot et al., 2009), Lake Kivu (Llirós et al., 2010), Spanish lakes (Auguet et al., 2011), and Danish lakes (Herrmann et al., 2009). The numbers of clones from each location are given in Table 1. “W” and “S” indicate water and sediment samples, respectively.
Mentions: Cluster analysis showed that the AEA communities in the lakes (including the saline/hypersaline lakes in this study and the freshwater lakes in other studies) within China were grouped into one cluster, separated from other freshwater lakes (except for the high Arctic Lake C1) around the world (e.g., Canada, Congo, Spain, Denmark; Figure 6). In addition, the AEA communities in Tibetan lakes exhibited little similarity to those in other saline habitats, such as the waters of Monterey Bay, the Eastern Tropical North Pacific, the Black Sea, Arctic Ocean, and Antarctic coasts (Figure 7A) and sediment samples from Elkhorn Slough, and Huntington Beach of California, Bahïa del Tbóari of Mexico, San Francisco Bay, and the tropical West Pacific Continental Margin and a Oak Ridge soil (Figure 7B).

Bottom Line: The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was present in hypersaline lakes with salinity up to 160 g L(-) (1).Thaumarchaeol was present in all of the studied hypersaline lakes, even in those where no AEA amoA gene was observed.Future research is needed to determine the ecological function of AEA and possible sources of thaumarchaeol in the Qinghai-Tibetan hypersaline lakes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Biogeology and Environmental Geology, China University of Geosciences Wuhan, China ; Key Lab of Salt Lake Resources and Chemistry, Qinghai Institute of Salt Lakes, Chinese Academy of Sciences Xining, China.

ABSTRACT
All known ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) belong to the phylum Thaumarchaeota within the domain Archaea. AOA possess the diagnostic amoA gene (encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenase) and produce lipid biomarker thaumarchaeol. Although the abundance and diversity of amoA gene-encoding archaea (AEA) in freshwater lakes have been well-studied, little is known about AEA ecology in saline/hypersaline lakes. In this study, the distribution of the archaeal amoA gene and thaumarchaeol were investigated in nine Qinghai-Tibetan lakes with a salinity range from freshwater to salt-saturation (salinity: 325 g L(-) (1)). The results showed that the archaeal amoA gene was present in hypersaline lakes with salinity up to 160 g L(-) (1). The archaeal amoA gene diversity in Tibetan lakes was different from those in other lakes worldwide, suggesting Tibetan lakes (high elevation, strong ultraviolet, and dry climate) may host a unique AEA population of different evolutionary origin from those in other lakes. Thaumarchaeol was present in all of the studied hypersaline lakes, even in those where no AEA amoA gene was observed. Future research is needed to determine the ecological function of AEA and possible sources of thaumarchaeol in the Qinghai-Tibetan hypersaline lakes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus