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Bacterial LuxR solos have evolved to respond to different molecules including signals from plants.

Patel HK, Suárez-Moreno ZR, Degrassi G, Subramoni S, González JF, Venturi V - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: LuxR proteins which have the same modular structure of QS LuxRs but are devoid of a cognate LuxI AHL synthase are called solos.For example, recent research has shown that a sub-family of LuxR solos responds to small molecules produced by plants.In this Mini Review article we will discuss current trends and implications of the role of LuxR solos in bacterial responses to other signals using proteins related to AHL QS systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Trieste, Italy.

ABSTRACT
A future challenge will be understanding the extensive communication that most likely takes place in bacterial interspecies and interkingdom signaling between plants and bacteria. A major bacterial inter-cellular signaling system in Gram-negative bacteria is LuxI/R quorum sensing (QS) based on the production (via the LuxI-family proteins) and detection (via the LuxR-family proteins) of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) signaling molecules. LuxR proteins which have the same modular structure of QS LuxRs but are devoid of a cognate LuxI AHL synthase are called solos. LuxR solos have been shown to be responsible to respond to exogenous AHLs produced by neighboring cells as well endogenously produced AHLs. It is now also evident that some LuxR proteins have evolved from the ability to binding AHLs and respond to other molecules/signals. For example, recent research has shown that a sub-family of LuxR solos responds to small molecules produced by plants. This indicates the presence of a uni-directional interkingdom signaling system occurring from plants to bacteria. In addition LuxR solos have now been also implicated to respond to endogenously produced signals which are not AHLs. In this Mini Review article we will discuss current trends and implications of the role of LuxR solos in bacterial responses to other signals using proteins related to AHL QS systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary of current mode of action of AHL QS and of LuxR solos in signaling between plants and bacteria.
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Figure 1: Summary of current mode of action of AHL QS and of LuxR solos in signaling between plants and bacteria.

Mentions: LuxR solos which are closely related to QS AHL LuxRs are widespread among proteobacteria. Recent studies have evidenced that LuxR solos have evolved away from responding to AHLs and bind to other signals (Figure 1). A sub-family of PAB LuxR solos are not involved in a QS response but rather respond to plant signals providing information to the bacterium of its arrival/entry in the plant for both pathogenic and beneficial species. Obviously, the outcome of this interkingdom response varies between pathogenic and beneficial bacteria as revealed for example with regulon studies of OryR in Xoo and PsoR in P. fluorescens. The major step now in better understanding this system is to identify the structure of the plant molecule(s) to which this LuxR-family responds to. This will be a major challenge as plants produce a very large number of low molecular weight secondary metabolites. It is tempting to think that the molecules will be structurally close to AHLs; however, as AHLs do not bind these LuxRs and do not interfere/compete with the plant response it could indicate that they are structurally unrelated. It is possible that different LuxRs of this subfamily bind/respond to different but related plants signals since so many different bacteria possess them interacting with many different plants. We cannot exclude however, that the plant signal is the same being a common compound present in many plants. Recently, the discovery that a LuxR solo responds to a different endogenous signal that is not an AHL opens the way to LuxR solos being part of other types of QS systems. In future work, we need therefore to consider that many LuxR solos may have evolved the ability to respond to a wide variety of signals.


Bacterial LuxR solos have evolved to respond to different molecules including signals from plants.

Patel HK, Suárez-Moreno ZR, Degrassi G, Subramoni S, González JF, Venturi V - Front Plant Sci (2013)

Summary of current mode of action of AHL QS and of LuxR solos in signaling between plants and bacteria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824090&req=5

Figure 1: Summary of current mode of action of AHL QS and of LuxR solos in signaling between plants and bacteria.
Mentions: LuxR solos which are closely related to QS AHL LuxRs are widespread among proteobacteria. Recent studies have evidenced that LuxR solos have evolved away from responding to AHLs and bind to other signals (Figure 1). A sub-family of PAB LuxR solos are not involved in a QS response but rather respond to plant signals providing information to the bacterium of its arrival/entry in the plant for both pathogenic and beneficial species. Obviously, the outcome of this interkingdom response varies between pathogenic and beneficial bacteria as revealed for example with regulon studies of OryR in Xoo and PsoR in P. fluorescens. The major step now in better understanding this system is to identify the structure of the plant molecule(s) to which this LuxR-family responds to. This will be a major challenge as plants produce a very large number of low molecular weight secondary metabolites. It is tempting to think that the molecules will be structurally close to AHLs; however, as AHLs do not bind these LuxRs and do not interfere/compete with the plant response it could indicate that they are structurally unrelated. It is possible that different LuxRs of this subfamily bind/respond to different but related plants signals since so many different bacteria possess them interacting with many different plants. We cannot exclude however, that the plant signal is the same being a common compound present in many plants. Recently, the discovery that a LuxR solo responds to a different endogenous signal that is not an AHL opens the way to LuxR solos being part of other types of QS systems. In future work, we need therefore to consider that many LuxR solos may have evolved the ability to respond to a wide variety of signals.

Bottom Line: LuxR proteins which have the same modular structure of QS LuxRs but are devoid of a cognate LuxI AHL synthase are called solos.For example, recent research has shown that a sub-family of LuxR solos responds to small molecules produced by plants.In this Mini Review article we will discuss current trends and implications of the role of LuxR solos in bacterial responses to other signals using proteins related to AHL QS systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology Trieste, Italy.

ABSTRACT
A future challenge will be understanding the extensive communication that most likely takes place in bacterial interspecies and interkingdom signaling between plants and bacteria. A major bacterial inter-cellular signaling system in Gram-negative bacteria is LuxI/R quorum sensing (QS) based on the production (via the LuxI-family proteins) and detection (via the LuxR-family proteins) of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) signaling molecules. LuxR proteins which have the same modular structure of QS LuxRs but are devoid of a cognate LuxI AHL synthase are called solos. LuxR solos have been shown to be responsible to respond to exogenous AHLs produced by neighboring cells as well endogenously produced AHLs. It is now also evident that some LuxR proteins have evolved from the ability to binding AHLs and respond to other molecules/signals. For example, recent research has shown that a sub-family of LuxR solos responds to small molecules produced by plants. This indicates the presence of a uni-directional interkingdom signaling system occurring from plants to bacteria. In addition LuxR solos have now been also implicated to respond to endogenously produced signals which are not AHLs. In this Mini Review article we will discuss current trends and implications of the role of LuxR solos in bacterial responses to other signals using proteins related to AHL QS systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus