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Acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing in the Roseobacter clade: complex cell-to-cell communication controls multiple physiologies.

Cude WN, Buchan A - Front Microbiol (2013)

Bottom Line: Recent studies suggest that members of the abundant marine Roseobacter lineage possess AHL-based QS systems and are environmentally relevant models for relating QS to ecological success.As reviewed here, these studies suggest that the roles of QS in roseobacters are varied and complex.An analysis of the 43 publically available Roseobacter genomes shows conservation of QS protein sequences and overall gene topologies, providing support for the hypothesis that QS is a conserved and widespread trait in the clade.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN, USA.

ABSTRACT
Bacteria have been widely reported to use quorum sensing (QS) systems, which employ small diffusible metabolites to coordinate gene expression in a population density dependent manner. In Proteobacteria, the most commonly described QS signaling molecules are N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Recent studies suggest that members of the abundant marine Roseobacter lineage possess AHL-based QS systems and are environmentally relevant models for relating QS to ecological success. As reviewed here, these studies suggest that the roles of QS in roseobacters are varied and complex. An analysis of the 43 publically available Roseobacter genomes shows conservation of QS protein sequences and overall gene topologies, providing support for the hypothesis that QS is a conserved and widespread trait in the clade.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of Roseobacter LuxR- (A) and LuxI-like (B) deduced amino acid sequences (see Appendix for details). Strain designations are shown and gene locus tags of the corresponding gene sequences can be found in Table A1. The scale bar represents the substitutions per sequence position. The Roseobacter clade number is represented in parentheses after the organism name and follows the classification system identified in Newton et al., 2010. Proposed designations of LuxR and LuxI subgroups in roseobacters are indicated by Greek character subscript and color. Bootstrap values <50% (from 1000 iterations) are shown at branch nodes. Sequences designated with a closed pentagon indicate organisms that have been shown experimentally, by either bioreporters or mass spectrometry, to produce AHLs (Wagner-Dobler et al., 2005; Rao et al., 2006; Bruhn et al., 2007; Berger et al., 2011; Case et al., 2011; Zan et al., 2012). Sequences designated with a circle are non-roseobacters.
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Figure 1: Maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of Roseobacter LuxR- (A) and LuxI-like (B) deduced amino acid sequences (see Appendix for details). Strain designations are shown and gene locus tags of the corresponding gene sequences can be found in Table A1. The scale bar represents the substitutions per sequence position. The Roseobacter clade number is represented in parentheses after the organism name and follows the classification system identified in Newton et al., 2010. Proposed designations of LuxR and LuxI subgroups in roseobacters are indicated by Greek character subscript and color. Bootstrap values <50% (from 1000 iterations) are shown at branch nodes. Sequences designated with a closed pentagon indicate organisms that have been shown experimentally, by either bioreporters or mass spectrometry, to produce AHLs (Wagner-Dobler et al., 2005; Rao et al., 2006; Bruhn et al., 2007; Berger et al., 2011; Case et al., 2011; Zan et al., 2012). Sequences designated with a circle are non-roseobacters.

Mentions: To understand the relatedness of AHL-based QS systems in roseobacters, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the LuxI- and their neighboring LuxR-like sequences in 38 Roseobacter genomes. As solo LuxR homologs have been found to bind a variety of ligands, including non-AHL molecules from eukaryotic organisms (Pappas et al., 2004; Subramoni and Venturi, 2009), it is difficult to infer their contribution in AHL-based QS. Thus, luxR genes that are not adjacent to luxI genes were not included in this analysis, but they are listed in Table A2. Likely a result of the close relatedness of clade members and instances of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), many of the LuxR- and LuxI-like proteins analyzed show high sequence similarity and can be grouped together (Figures 1A,B). Our phylogenetic trees suggests there are four LuxR-like (designated Rα, Rβ, Rγ, and Rδ) and four LuxI-like protein types (designated Iα, Iβ, Iγ, and Iδ) found in most sequenced roseobacters, though more sequence variants may be discovered as more genome sequences become available.


Acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing in the Roseobacter clade: complex cell-to-cell communication controls multiple physiologies.

Cude WN, Buchan A - Front Microbiol (2013)

Maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of Roseobacter LuxR- (A) and LuxI-like (B) deduced amino acid sequences (see Appendix for details). Strain designations are shown and gene locus tags of the corresponding gene sequences can be found in Table A1. The scale bar represents the substitutions per sequence position. The Roseobacter clade number is represented in parentheses after the organism name and follows the classification system identified in Newton et al., 2010. Proposed designations of LuxR and LuxI subgroups in roseobacters are indicated by Greek character subscript and color. Bootstrap values <50% (from 1000 iterations) are shown at branch nodes. Sequences designated with a closed pentagon indicate organisms that have been shown experimentally, by either bioreporters or mass spectrometry, to produce AHLs (Wagner-Dobler et al., 2005; Rao et al., 2006; Bruhn et al., 2007; Berger et al., 2011; Case et al., 2011; Zan et al., 2012). Sequences designated with a circle are non-roseobacters.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824088&req=5

Figure 1: Maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees of Roseobacter LuxR- (A) and LuxI-like (B) deduced amino acid sequences (see Appendix for details). Strain designations are shown and gene locus tags of the corresponding gene sequences can be found in Table A1. The scale bar represents the substitutions per sequence position. The Roseobacter clade number is represented in parentheses after the organism name and follows the classification system identified in Newton et al., 2010. Proposed designations of LuxR and LuxI subgroups in roseobacters are indicated by Greek character subscript and color. Bootstrap values <50% (from 1000 iterations) are shown at branch nodes. Sequences designated with a closed pentagon indicate organisms that have been shown experimentally, by either bioreporters or mass spectrometry, to produce AHLs (Wagner-Dobler et al., 2005; Rao et al., 2006; Bruhn et al., 2007; Berger et al., 2011; Case et al., 2011; Zan et al., 2012). Sequences designated with a circle are non-roseobacters.
Mentions: To understand the relatedness of AHL-based QS systems in roseobacters, we performed a phylogenetic reconstruction of the LuxI- and their neighboring LuxR-like sequences in 38 Roseobacter genomes. As solo LuxR homologs have been found to bind a variety of ligands, including non-AHL molecules from eukaryotic organisms (Pappas et al., 2004; Subramoni and Venturi, 2009), it is difficult to infer their contribution in AHL-based QS. Thus, luxR genes that are not adjacent to luxI genes were not included in this analysis, but they are listed in Table A2. Likely a result of the close relatedness of clade members and instances of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), many of the LuxR- and LuxI-like proteins analyzed show high sequence similarity and can be grouped together (Figures 1A,B). Our phylogenetic trees suggests there are four LuxR-like (designated Rα, Rβ, Rγ, and Rδ) and four LuxI-like protein types (designated Iα, Iβ, Iγ, and Iδ) found in most sequenced roseobacters, though more sequence variants may be discovered as more genome sequences become available.

Bottom Line: Recent studies suggest that members of the abundant marine Roseobacter lineage possess AHL-based QS systems and are environmentally relevant models for relating QS to ecological success.As reviewed here, these studies suggest that the roles of QS in roseobacters are varied and complex.An analysis of the 43 publically available Roseobacter genomes shows conservation of QS protein sequences and overall gene topologies, providing support for the hypothesis that QS is a conserved and widespread trait in the clade.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN, USA.

ABSTRACT
Bacteria have been widely reported to use quorum sensing (QS) systems, which employ small diffusible metabolites to coordinate gene expression in a population density dependent manner. In Proteobacteria, the most commonly described QS signaling molecules are N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Recent studies suggest that members of the abundant marine Roseobacter lineage possess AHL-based QS systems and are environmentally relevant models for relating QS to ecological success. As reviewed here, these studies suggest that the roles of QS in roseobacters are varied and complex. An analysis of the 43 publically available Roseobacter genomes shows conservation of QS protein sequences and overall gene topologies, providing support for the hypothesis that QS is a conserved and widespread trait in the clade.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus