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A trial of a brief group-based form of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for chronic pain in general practice: pilot outcome and process results.

McCracken LM, Sato A, Taylor GJ - J Pain (2013)

Bottom Line: Immediately post treatment, relative to TAU, participants in ACT demonstrated lower depression and higher ratings of overall improvement.At a 3-month follow-up, again relative to TAU, those in ACT demonstrated lower disability, less depression, and significantly higher pain acceptance; d = .58, .59, and .64, respectively.Analyses based on intention-to-treat and on treatment "completers," perhaps predictably, revealed more sobering and more encouraging results, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Psychology Section, Psychology Department, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; INPUT Pain Management, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Lance.McCracken@kcl.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

CONSORT flow diagram. *One participant in the TAU condition was uncontactable at posttreatment but contactable at follow-up.
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fig1: CONSORT flow diagram. *One participant in the TAU condition was uncontactable at posttreatment but contactable at follow-up.

Mentions: Potential participants meeting eligibility criteria were sent an invitation letter, trial information sheet, consent form, and screening questionnaire by their GPs (N = 481). Participants who wished to take part returned their signed consent forms and the screening questionnaire to the research team by post and were screened for eligibility (n = 102). Twenty-nine potential participants were excluded at this stage, 22 for not meeting criteria. Seven did not provide consent. Seventy-three potential participants were randomized to ACT (n = 37) or treatment as usual (n = 36). A consort diagram is included in Fig 1.


A trial of a brief group-based form of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for chronic pain in general practice: pilot outcome and process results.

McCracken LM, Sato A, Taylor GJ - J Pain (2013)

CONSORT flow diagram. *One participant in the TAU condition was uncontactable at posttreatment but contactable at follow-up.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824075&req=5

fig1: CONSORT flow diagram. *One participant in the TAU condition was uncontactable at posttreatment but contactable at follow-up.
Mentions: Potential participants meeting eligibility criteria were sent an invitation letter, trial information sheet, consent form, and screening questionnaire by their GPs (N = 481). Participants who wished to take part returned their signed consent forms and the screening questionnaire to the research team by post and were screened for eligibility (n = 102). Twenty-nine potential participants were excluded at this stage, 22 for not meeting criteria. Seven did not provide consent. Seventy-three potential participants were randomized to ACT (n = 37) or treatment as usual (n = 36). A consort diagram is included in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: Immediately post treatment, relative to TAU, participants in ACT demonstrated lower depression and higher ratings of overall improvement.At a 3-month follow-up, again relative to TAU, those in ACT demonstrated lower disability, less depression, and significantly higher pain acceptance; d = .58, .59, and .64, respectively.Analyses based on intention-to-treat and on treatment "completers," perhaps predictably, revealed more sobering and more encouraging results, respectively.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Psychology Section, Psychology Department, King's College London, London, United Kingdom; INPUT Pain Management, Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Lance.McCracken@kcl.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus