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Entrapment of a volatile lipophilic aroma compound (d-limonene) in spray dried water-washed oil bodies naturally derived from sunflower seeds (Helianthus annus).

Fisk ID, Linforth R, Trophardy G, Gray D - Food Res. Int. (2013)

Bottom Line: Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%.Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul.Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Food Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Oil bodies are natural emulsions that can be extracted from oil seeds and have previously been shown to be stable after spray drying. The aim of the study was to evaluate for the first time if spray dried water-washed oil bodies are an effective carrier for volatile lipophilic actives (the flavour compound d-limonene was used as an example aroma compound). Water-washed oil bodies were blended with maltodextrin and d-limonene and spray dried using a Buchi B-191 laboratory spray dryer. Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%. Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul. Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene. This indicates that whilst additional emulsifiers may be required for future applications of water-washed oil bodies as carriers of lipophilic actives, oil bodies are excellent agents for lipid encapsulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Normalised time-course profiles for dynamic headspace dilution measurements of d-limonene in an aqueous suspension of spray dried samples stabilised by water-washed oil bodies (diamond), lecithin (triangle) and Capsul (cross), all samples were prepared with low homogenisation and at 0.015% lipid sample, experiment was run for 10 min for all samples, but data are only shown to 3.0 min for clarity.
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f0015: Normalised time-course profiles for dynamic headspace dilution measurements of d-limonene in an aqueous suspension of spray dried samples stabilised by water-washed oil bodies (diamond), lecithin (triangle) and Capsul (cross), all samples were prepared with low homogenisation and at 0.015% lipid sample, experiment was run for 10 min for all samples, but data are only shown to 3.0 min for clarity.

Mentions: Further to the static headspace measurements of d-limonene, the spray dried rehydrated water-washed oil bodies were assessed by a dynamic headspace dilution method. This was carried out on the powder after re-suspension to more closely represent the ability of oil body systems to release aroma compounds during consumption. The results for low homogenisation are shown in Fig. 3. Statistical analysis was performed (ANOVA, P < 0.05) and showed that there is no statistically significant differences between the data sets after 2.5 minutes. Although it can be noted that in all cases the samples subjected to low shear mixing had higher %nHI than those subjected to high shear mixing. It can also be noted that in both cases the %nHI of the oil body suspension was higher in the early phases of headspace dilution than the lecithin sample. This corroborates our earlier work oil body suspensions (Fisk et al., 2011), which showed that water-washed oil bodies had a higher normalised headspace intensity than phospholipid stabilised emulsions, although as this effect is lipid content dependent the low lipid levels have reduced the total measurable differences.


Entrapment of a volatile lipophilic aroma compound (d-limonene) in spray dried water-washed oil bodies naturally derived from sunflower seeds (Helianthus annus).

Fisk ID, Linforth R, Trophardy G, Gray D - Food Res. Int. (2013)

Normalised time-course profiles for dynamic headspace dilution measurements of d-limonene in an aqueous suspension of spray dried samples stabilised by water-washed oil bodies (diamond), lecithin (triangle) and Capsul (cross), all samples were prepared with low homogenisation and at 0.015% lipid sample, experiment was run for 10 min for all samples, but data are only shown to 3.0 min for clarity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824067&req=5

f0015: Normalised time-course profiles for dynamic headspace dilution measurements of d-limonene in an aqueous suspension of spray dried samples stabilised by water-washed oil bodies (diamond), lecithin (triangle) and Capsul (cross), all samples were prepared with low homogenisation and at 0.015% lipid sample, experiment was run for 10 min for all samples, but data are only shown to 3.0 min for clarity.
Mentions: Further to the static headspace measurements of d-limonene, the spray dried rehydrated water-washed oil bodies were assessed by a dynamic headspace dilution method. This was carried out on the powder after re-suspension to more closely represent the ability of oil body systems to release aroma compounds during consumption. The results for low homogenisation are shown in Fig. 3. Statistical analysis was performed (ANOVA, P < 0.05) and showed that there is no statistically significant differences between the data sets after 2.5 minutes. Although it can be noted that in all cases the samples subjected to low shear mixing had higher %nHI than those subjected to high shear mixing. It can also be noted that in both cases the %nHI of the oil body suspension was higher in the early phases of headspace dilution than the lecithin sample. This corroborates our earlier work oil body suspensions (Fisk et al., 2011), which showed that water-washed oil bodies had a higher normalised headspace intensity than phospholipid stabilised emulsions, although as this effect is lipid content dependent the low lipid levels have reduced the total measurable differences.

Bottom Line: Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%.Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul.Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Food Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Oil bodies are natural emulsions that can be extracted from oil seeds and have previously been shown to be stable after spray drying. The aim of the study was to evaluate for the first time if spray dried water-washed oil bodies are an effective carrier for volatile lipophilic actives (the flavour compound d-limonene was used as an example aroma compound). Water-washed oil bodies were blended with maltodextrin and d-limonene and spray dried using a Buchi B-191 laboratory spray dryer. Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%. Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul. Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene. This indicates that whilst additional emulsifiers may be required for future applications of water-washed oil bodies as carriers of lipophilic actives, oil bodies are excellent agents for lipid encapsulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus