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Entrapment of a volatile lipophilic aroma compound (d-limonene) in spray dried water-washed oil bodies naturally derived from sunflower seeds (Helianthus annus).

Fisk ID, Linforth R, Trophardy G, Gray D - Food Res. Int. (2013)

Bottom Line: Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%.Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul.Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Food Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Oil bodies are natural emulsions that can be extracted from oil seeds and have previously been shown to be stable after spray drying. The aim of the study was to evaluate for the first time if spray dried water-washed oil bodies are an effective carrier for volatile lipophilic actives (the flavour compound d-limonene was used as an example aroma compound). Water-washed oil bodies were blended with maltodextrin and d-limonene and spray dried using a Buchi B-191 laboratory spray dryer. Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%. Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul. Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene. This indicates that whilst additional emulsifiers may be required for future applications of water-washed oil bodies as carriers of lipophilic actives, oil bodies are excellent agents for lipid encapsulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Volume based size distribution of urea-washed sunflower oil bodies (UW) before (thick black line) and after spray drying and rehydration (1 hour (dotted line) and 24 hours (thin black line) after rehydration).
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f0010: Volume based size distribution of urea-washed sunflower oil bodies (UW) before (thick black line) and after spray drying and rehydration (1 hour (dotted line) and 24 hours (thin black line) after rehydration).

Mentions: Water-washed or urea-washed oil bodies from dehulled sunflower seeds (100 g batches) were extracted (grinding medium 0.5 L, 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.5, 0.6 M sucrose) and purified (5 mL per 25 mL, 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5) by methods detailed previously (Fisk et al., 2011, 2008), originally based on the method of Tzen, Peng, Cheng, Chen, and Chiu (1997). Urea-washed oil bodies were used to evaluate the impact of spray drying on the basic oil body size distribution (Fig. 2) and water-washed oil bodies were used for all other results, water-washed oil bodies were chosen as they represent the commercially viable fraction that may be used for future applications and at laboratory scale had extraction yields of > 10% had lipid concentrations of > 80% and protein concentrations of < 10%, SDS-PAGE protein characterisation was conducted and has confirmed the presence of oleosin and caleosin proteins (data not shown).


Entrapment of a volatile lipophilic aroma compound (d-limonene) in spray dried water-washed oil bodies naturally derived from sunflower seeds (Helianthus annus).

Fisk ID, Linforth R, Trophardy G, Gray D - Food Res. Int. (2013)

Volume based size distribution of urea-washed sunflower oil bodies (UW) before (thick black line) and after spray drying and rehydration (1 hour (dotted line) and 24 hours (thin black line) after rehydration).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824067&req=5

f0010: Volume based size distribution of urea-washed sunflower oil bodies (UW) before (thick black line) and after spray drying and rehydration (1 hour (dotted line) and 24 hours (thin black line) after rehydration).
Mentions: Water-washed or urea-washed oil bodies from dehulled sunflower seeds (100 g batches) were extracted (grinding medium 0.5 L, 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.5, 0.6 M sucrose) and purified (5 mL per 25 mL, 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.5) by methods detailed previously (Fisk et al., 2011, 2008), originally based on the method of Tzen, Peng, Cheng, Chen, and Chiu (1997). Urea-washed oil bodies were used to evaluate the impact of spray drying on the basic oil body size distribution (Fig. 2) and water-washed oil bodies were used for all other results, water-washed oil bodies were chosen as they represent the commercially viable fraction that may be used for future applications and at laboratory scale had extraction yields of > 10% had lipid concentrations of > 80% and protein concentrations of < 10%, SDS-PAGE protein characterisation was conducted and has confirmed the presence of oleosin and caleosin proteins (data not shown).

Bottom Line: Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%.Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul.Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Food Sciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington Campus, Sutton Bonington, Loughborough, Leicestershire, LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Oil bodies are natural emulsions that can be extracted from oil seeds and have previously been shown to be stable after spray drying. The aim of the study was to evaluate for the first time if spray dried water-washed oil bodies are an effective carrier for volatile lipophilic actives (the flavour compound d-limonene was used as an example aroma compound). Water-washed oil bodies were blended with maltodextrin and d-limonene and spray dried using a Buchi B-191 laboratory spray dryer. Lipid and d-limonene retention was 89-93% and 24-27%. Samples were compared to processed emulsions containing sunflower oil and d-limonene and stabilised by either lecithin or Capsul. Lecithin and Capsul processed emulsions had a lipid and d-limonene retention of 82-89%, 7.7-9.1% and 48-50%, 55-59% respectively indicating that water-washed oil bodies could retain the most lipids and Capsul could retain the most d-limonene. This indicates that whilst additional emulsifiers may be required for future applications of water-washed oil bodies as carriers of lipophilic actives, oil bodies are excellent agents for lipid encapsulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus