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A solid state fungal fermentation-based strategy for the hydrolysis of wheat straw.

Pensupa N, Jin M, Kokolski M, Archer DB, Du C - Bioresour. Technol. (2013)

Bottom Line: The addition of yeast extract (0.5% w/v) and minerals significantly improved the cellulase production, to 24.0 ± 1.76 U/g.The hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw using the fungal culture filtrate or commercial cellulase Ctec2 was performed, resulting in 4.34 and 3.13 g/L glucose respectively.It indicated that the fungal filtrate harvested from the fungal fermentation of wheat straw contained a more suitable enzyme mixture than the commercial cellulase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biosciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

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Enzyme hydrolysis of fermented wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), fermented wheat straw using fungal extract (), autoclaved wheat straw using mixture of commercial enzyme and fungal extract () and autoclaved wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), expressed as glucose released from wheat straw after enzymatic hydrolysis at 50 °C for 73 h. The experiments were carried out with n = 3 and the error bars indicate standard deviation of each data set.
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f0030: Enzyme hydrolysis of fermented wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), fermented wheat straw using fungal extract (), autoclaved wheat straw using mixture of commercial enzyme and fungal extract () and autoclaved wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), expressed as glucose released from wheat straw after enzymatic hydrolysis at 50 °C for 73 h. The experiments were carried out with n = 3 and the error bars indicate standard deviation of each data set.

Mentions: After the solid state fungal fermentation, the fungal extract (enzyme solution) was collected and used as the cellulase solution for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw, as shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 6 presents the glucose concentration profiles of the wheat straw hydrolysis catalyzed by both the commercial cellulase Ctec2 (Novozymes) and the fungal extract (from the SSF using autoclaved wheat straw, 0.5% YE with mineral). Two substrates, fermented wheat straw and autoclaved wheat straw before the fungal fermentations were compared in order to investigate the impact of SSF itself. In the first 22 h, no significant difference was observed between these experiments. Glucose was released with a fast speed of around 0.4 g/L/h at the first 6 h. After 22 h the hydrolysis using Ctec2 stopped glucose generation, resulting in around 3.13 g/L glucose. Meanwhile, the hydrolyses using the fungal extract and mixture of fungal extract /Ctec2 continued until around 4.3 g/L (using fermented wheat straw) and 3.6 g/L (using autoclaved wheat straw) glucose were liberated into the hydrolysates. These results suggested that although the fungal extract had a lower detected cellulase activity, it performed the same or even better than the Ctec2 solution.


A solid state fungal fermentation-based strategy for the hydrolysis of wheat straw.

Pensupa N, Jin M, Kokolski M, Archer DB, Du C - Bioresour. Technol. (2013)

Enzyme hydrolysis of fermented wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), fermented wheat straw using fungal extract (), autoclaved wheat straw using mixture of commercial enzyme and fungal extract () and autoclaved wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), expressed as glucose released from wheat straw after enzymatic hydrolysis at 50 °C for 73 h. The experiments were carried out with n = 3 and the error bars indicate standard deviation of each data set.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3824065&req=5

f0030: Enzyme hydrolysis of fermented wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), fermented wheat straw using fungal extract (), autoclaved wheat straw using mixture of commercial enzyme and fungal extract () and autoclaved wheat straw using commercial enzyme (), expressed as glucose released from wheat straw after enzymatic hydrolysis at 50 °C for 73 h. The experiments were carried out with n = 3 and the error bars indicate standard deviation of each data set.
Mentions: After the solid state fungal fermentation, the fungal extract (enzyme solution) was collected and used as the cellulase solution for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw, as shown in Fig. 1. Fig. 6 presents the glucose concentration profiles of the wheat straw hydrolysis catalyzed by both the commercial cellulase Ctec2 (Novozymes) and the fungal extract (from the SSF using autoclaved wheat straw, 0.5% YE with mineral). Two substrates, fermented wheat straw and autoclaved wheat straw before the fungal fermentations were compared in order to investigate the impact of SSF itself. In the first 22 h, no significant difference was observed between these experiments. Glucose was released with a fast speed of around 0.4 g/L/h at the first 6 h. After 22 h the hydrolysis using Ctec2 stopped glucose generation, resulting in around 3.13 g/L glucose. Meanwhile, the hydrolyses using the fungal extract and mixture of fungal extract /Ctec2 continued until around 4.3 g/L (using fermented wheat straw) and 3.6 g/L (using autoclaved wheat straw) glucose were liberated into the hydrolysates. These results suggested that although the fungal extract had a lower detected cellulase activity, it performed the same or even better than the Ctec2 solution.

Bottom Line: The addition of yeast extract (0.5% w/v) and minerals significantly improved the cellulase production, to 24.0 ± 1.76 U/g.The hydrolysis of the fermented wheat straw using the fungal culture filtrate or commercial cellulase Ctec2 was performed, resulting in 4.34 and 3.13 g/L glucose respectively.It indicated that the fungal filtrate harvested from the fungal fermentation of wheat straw contained a more suitable enzyme mixture than the commercial cellulase.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biosciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, University of Nottingham, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE12 5RD, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH