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Comparison of commercial fibrin sealants in facelift surgery: a prospective study.

Botti G, Pascali M, Botti C, Bodog F, Gentile P, Cervelli V - Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol (2013)

Bottom Line: The results were almost equivalent.The two fibrin sealants used were nearly identical with regard to patient safety and quality of the result.Nevertheless, it is noted that, while Tissucol has both hemostatic and "gluing" effects, Quixil is mainly effective in securing hemostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Villa Bella Clinic, Salò, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two types of fibrin glue in patients undergoing facelift surgery.

Methods: A prospective, controlled "right-left side" study was carried out in 20 patients. The two fibrin sealants used were Quixil® and Tissucol®. The two sealants were used at the same time, ie, one on one side of the face and the other on the contralateral side. Comparisons were made with regard to rates of hematoma and seroma, degree of induration, edema, ecchymosis, pain levels, and patient satisfaction.

Results: The results were almost equivalent. The only exception was a significant (40 mL) hematoma in a patient treated with Quixil. Bleeding was most likely due to a sudden rise in blood pressure during the immediate postoperative period. However, it must be emphasized that, while Tissucol actually seals the undermined area, thus virtually eliminating the dead space, Quixil acts differently, in that its effectiveness in preventing hematoma is linked mainly to its hemostatic effect.

Conclusion: The two fibrin sealants used were nearly identical with regard to patient safety and quality of the result. Nevertheless, it is noted that, while Tissucol has both hemostatic and "gluing" effects, Quixil is mainly effective in securing hemostasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Image of a 55-year-old woman who has undergone facelift and upper blepharoplasty.
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f4-ccid-6-273: Image of a 55-year-old woman who has undergone facelift and upper blepharoplasty.

Mentions: The products were prepared according to the manufacturers’ instructions and then sprayed in aerosol form in the subcutaneous plane, already reduced after repositioning of the superficial muscular aponeurotic system, on the raw dissected surfaces in the periauricular region, neck included (Figure 2). In all cases, the left side of the rhytidectomy was treated using Tissucol and the right side with Quixil. The amount of glue used was 2 mL per side. After the glue was sprayed, the excess was squeezed out through the skin incision and removed (Figure 3). Gentle external pressure was applied using moist gauze for 3 minutes to the flaps. No drains were used. In order to maintain constant moderate compression, a light protective dressing was applied for 8 hours, after which it was removed (usually in the late afternoon) to check that no blood had collected (Figures 4 and 5).


Comparison of commercial fibrin sealants in facelift surgery: a prospective study.

Botti G, Pascali M, Botti C, Bodog F, Gentile P, Cervelli V - Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol (2013)

Image of a 55-year-old woman who has undergone facelift and upper blepharoplasty.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3823615&req=5

f4-ccid-6-273: Image of a 55-year-old woman who has undergone facelift and upper blepharoplasty.
Mentions: The products were prepared according to the manufacturers’ instructions and then sprayed in aerosol form in the subcutaneous plane, already reduced after repositioning of the superficial muscular aponeurotic system, on the raw dissected surfaces in the periauricular region, neck included (Figure 2). In all cases, the left side of the rhytidectomy was treated using Tissucol and the right side with Quixil. The amount of glue used was 2 mL per side. After the glue was sprayed, the excess was squeezed out through the skin incision and removed (Figure 3). Gentle external pressure was applied using moist gauze for 3 minutes to the flaps. No drains were used. In order to maintain constant moderate compression, a light protective dressing was applied for 8 hours, after which it was removed (usually in the late afternoon) to check that no blood had collected (Figures 4 and 5).

Bottom Line: The results were almost equivalent.The two fibrin sealants used were nearly identical with regard to patient safety and quality of the result.Nevertheless, it is noted that, while Tissucol has both hemostatic and "gluing" effects, Quixil is mainly effective in securing hemostasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Villa Bella Clinic, Salò, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two types of fibrin glue in patients undergoing facelift surgery.

Methods: A prospective, controlled "right-left side" study was carried out in 20 patients. The two fibrin sealants used were Quixil® and Tissucol®. The two sealants were used at the same time, ie, one on one side of the face and the other on the contralateral side. Comparisons were made with regard to rates of hematoma and seroma, degree of induration, edema, ecchymosis, pain levels, and patient satisfaction.

Results: The results were almost equivalent. The only exception was a significant (40 mL) hematoma in a patient treated with Quixil. Bleeding was most likely due to a sudden rise in blood pressure during the immediate postoperative period. However, it must be emphasized that, while Tissucol actually seals the undermined area, thus virtually eliminating the dead space, Quixil acts differently, in that its effectiveness in preventing hematoma is linked mainly to its hemostatic effect.

Conclusion: The two fibrin sealants used were nearly identical with regard to patient safety and quality of the result. Nevertheless, it is noted that, while Tissucol has both hemostatic and "gluing" effects, Quixil is mainly effective in securing hemostasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus