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Osteochondral tissue engineering: scaffolds, stem cells and applications.

Nooeaid P, Salih V, Beier JP, Boccaccini AR - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2012)

Bottom Line: For reasons of the limitation in the capacity of articular cartilage to self-repair, it is essential to develop approaches based on suitable scaffolds made of appropriate engineered biomaterials.The combination of biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics in a variety of composite structures is promising in this area, whereby the fabrication methods, associated cells and signalling factors determine the success of the strategies.Additionally, cell sources and biological protein incorporation methods are discussed, addressing their interaction with scaffolds and highlighting the potential for creating a new generation of bilayered composite scaffolds that can mimic the native interfacial tissue properties, and are able to adapt to the biological environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.

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Schematic diagram of bilayered scaffolds, including (I) scaffolds for individual bone and cartilage tissue regeneration combined at the time of implantation, (II) scaffold for bone component and scaffold-free approach for cartilage component, (III) single and homogeneous scaffolds and (IV) single but heterogeneous scaffolds (Modified from Mano et al. [10]).
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fig02: Schematic diagram of bilayered scaffolds, including (I) scaffolds for individual bone and cartilage tissue regeneration combined at the time of implantation, (II) scaffold for bone component and scaffold-free approach for cartilage component, (III) single and homogeneous scaffolds and (IV) single but heterogeneous scaffolds (Modified from Mano et al. [10]).

Mentions: Because of the markedly different tissue properties at the interface between cartilage and subchondral bone, different scaffolds can be used individually for cartilage and bone components. If bioreactors are used, they allow the cultivation of both chondrogenic and osteogenic cells in separate environments [63]. Then, constructs for cartilage tissue and bone tissue developed separately are combined into a single composite graft by suturing or adhering two layers together, as shown in Figure 2 (I). The main disadvantage of this approach is that integration between the two layers may not be satisfactory [10]. Schaefer et al. [64] investigated the use of 3D cartilage/bone composites based on biodegradable polymer scaffolds combined with chondrogenic and osteogenic cells. Cartilage constructs were created by PGA meshes cultured with bovine calf articular chondrocytes. Bone constructs were created by the blend of PLGA and PEG cultured with bovine calf periosteal cells. Pairs of constructs were sutured together after 1 or 4 weeks of isolated culture, then the resulting composites were cultured for additional 4 weeks. It was found that the osteochondral composites generated by suturing were stable and did not separate upon removal of the sutures at the time of harvest. From the histological assessment, the accumulation of GAG showed a higher scattered area at 4 weeks culture time in comparison with that at 1 week culture time. In the region of bone, no evidence of mineralization was found after 1 week, whereas there was mineralization after culturing for 4 weeks. Therefore, the amount of GAG and mineralization was confirmed to increase with cultured time. After 1 week of culture of the cartilage compartment combined with 1 week of culture of the bone compartment and with additional culture of the composites for 4 weeks, good integration at the tissue interface was found. In contrast, composites obtained from the combination of 4 weeks culture of cartilage and 4 weeks culture of bone separately showed poor integration at the interface, although more continuous ECM-containing GAG was observed in the cartilage region of both composites after additional 4 weeks of combined culture. This study concluded that newly produced cartilage and bone tissues affected integration at the cartilage–bone interface. The combination of immature cartilage-like construct (after 1 week in isolated culture) and mature bone-like construct (after 4 weeks in isolated culture) was seen to be effective to form a composite construct and to promote integration at the interface. Gao et al. [57] demonstrated the potential of using an ICP for the bone layer and a hyaluronan (HyA) sponge seeded with MPCs for the cartilage layer. After 12 weeks of implantation in a lapine model, the osteochondral defect was filled almost 100% with repair tissue and the HyA part was resorbed by 10 weeks. Zonal arrangement, including superficial, chondroid tissue, and interface layers, appeared to take place in the neo-cartilaginous tissue [57]. Significantly, the two-phase composite construct showed great integration at the interface between HyA and ICP components, ascribed to the local mechanical stress. The compressive load of the joint was applied and transmitted through the HyA sponge, ICP component and the bottom of the defect. The counteracting load was generated upwards and laterally, and induced the infiltration of ICP into the pores of the HyA sponge, leading to interface integration. Moreover, the laterally counteracting load was expanded laterally by the HyA sponge, causing a contact between the sponge and the surrounding native cartilage. Shao et al. [65] attempted to evaluate the repair potential in osteochondral defects (high load-bearing sites) by using hybrid scaffolds with MSCs in a lapine model. The scaffolds comprised PCL for the cartilage component and TCP-reinforced PCL for the bone component. The scaffolds were seeded with MSCs in each part and placed in osteochondral defects of lapine models by press-fit implantation. Repair tissues were evaluated at 12 and 24 weeks after implantation [65]. Compared with the control group (without cells), the PCL/PCL-TCP scaffolds showed superior repair ability in both bone and cartilage parts, indicating that the hybrid scaffolds provided sufficient support to new osteochondral tissue formation. From a period of 12–24 weeks, bone generation led to the firm integration to host tissue. After 24 weeks of implantation, subchondral bone filled the scaffold, which showed good integration with the host bone. Moreover, cartilage tissue exhibited GAG and collagen type II deposition. However, the cell arrangement in new cartilage tissue lacked zonal organization. The Young's modulus of the neotissue–polymer matrix construct at 24 weeks after implantation (∼0.76 MPa) approached that of normal cartilage of mature rabbits (∼0.81 MPa) [65]. The authors stated that this phenomenon could have been caused by the slow degradation of PCL-based hybrid scaffolds, which might leave remnants in the repair space over time and these remnants could help maintain sufficient mechanical support for subchondral bone and neocartilage. However, the possible changes in the scaffold and repair tissues over longer times of implantation were not shown in the study [65]. Neocartilage that deteriorates with time may happen, as shown in the study of Chu et al. [66]. Neocartilage in the region of repair tissue in rabbit decreased from 95% at 12 weeks to only 29% at 1-year follow-up [66, 67]. Scotti et al. [68] generated osteochondral composites including collagen-containing human chondrocytes for the cartilage part and fibrin gel for the bone part. It was shown that the separate cell pre-culture before generation of the composite allowed more efficient cartilaginous matrix accumulation than without pre-culture. Moreover, good biological bonding of the chondral scaffold with the bony scaffold by the cell-laid ECM occurred, indicating a suitable mechanical integrity at the interface and the possibility of effective surgical handling. Chen et al. [69] formulated a bilayered scaffold for simultaneous regeneration of cartilage and bone using gene delivery system to induce the growth of MSCs. Plasmid TGF-β1 activated chitosan/gelatin (CG) porous scaffold and Plasmid BMP-2 activated hydroxyapatite/chitosan/gelatin porous (HCG) scaffold were fabricated for the cartilage and bone regions, respectively. Both scaffolds were seeded with MSCs separately before integrated with fibrin glue. The interface of the bilayered scaffold showed good integration as a result of the interdigitation of the chondral phase into the osseous phase. After 2 weeks of co-culture, it was found that pTGF-β1 and pBMP-2 can induce MSCs in each layer to differentiate into chondrogenic and osteogenic-like cells. This demonstrated that the localized delivery system of DNA as tissue inductive factors in bilayered scaffolds could facilitate the differentiation of stem cells into specific cell types to develop complex tissues. An in vivo study in a rabbit model showed that the gene delivery system utilized in this bilayered construct simultaneously supported cartilage and bone regeneration, presenting a promising strategy for facilitating the development of osteochondral tissue [68].


Osteochondral tissue engineering: scaffolds, stem cells and applications.

Nooeaid P, Salih V, Beier JP, Boccaccini AR - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2012)

Schematic diagram of bilayered scaffolds, including (I) scaffolds for individual bone and cartilage tissue regeneration combined at the time of implantation, (II) scaffold for bone component and scaffold-free approach for cartilage component, (III) single and homogeneous scaffolds and (IV) single but heterogeneous scaffolds (Modified from Mano et al. [10]).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3823419&req=5

fig02: Schematic diagram of bilayered scaffolds, including (I) scaffolds for individual bone and cartilage tissue regeneration combined at the time of implantation, (II) scaffold for bone component and scaffold-free approach for cartilage component, (III) single and homogeneous scaffolds and (IV) single but heterogeneous scaffolds (Modified from Mano et al. [10]).
Mentions: Because of the markedly different tissue properties at the interface between cartilage and subchondral bone, different scaffolds can be used individually for cartilage and bone components. If bioreactors are used, they allow the cultivation of both chondrogenic and osteogenic cells in separate environments [63]. Then, constructs for cartilage tissue and bone tissue developed separately are combined into a single composite graft by suturing or adhering two layers together, as shown in Figure 2 (I). The main disadvantage of this approach is that integration between the two layers may not be satisfactory [10]. Schaefer et al. [64] investigated the use of 3D cartilage/bone composites based on biodegradable polymer scaffolds combined with chondrogenic and osteogenic cells. Cartilage constructs were created by PGA meshes cultured with bovine calf articular chondrocytes. Bone constructs were created by the blend of PLGA and PEG cultured with bovine calf periosteal cells. Pairs of constructs were sutured together after 1 or 4 weeks of isolated culture, then the resulting composites were cultured for additional 4 weeks. It was found that the osteochondral composites generated by suturing were stable and did not separate upon removal of the sutures at the time of harvest. From the histological assessment, the accumulation of GAG showed a higher scattered area at 4 weeks culture time in comparison with that at 1 week culture time. In the region of bone, no evidence of mineralization was found after 1 week, whereas there was mineralization after culturing for 4 weeks. Therefore, the amount of GAG and mineralization was confirmed to increase with cultured time. After 1 week of culture of the cartilage compartment combined with 1 week of culture of the bone compartment and with additional culture of the composites for 4 weeks, good integration at the tissue interface was found. In contrast, composites obtained from the combination of 4 weeks culture of cartilage and 4 weeks culture of bone separately showed poor integration at the interface, although more continuous ECM-containing GAG was observed in the cartilage region of both composites after additional 4 weeks of combined culture. This study concluded that newly produced cartilage and bone tissues affected integration at the cartilage–bone interface. The combination of immature cartilage-like construct (after 1 week in isolated culture) and mature bone-like construct (after 4 weeks in isolated culture) was seen to be effective to form a composite construct and to promote integration at the interface. Gao et al. [57] demonstrated the potential of using an ICP for the bone layer and a hyaluronan (HyA) sponge seeded with MPCs for the cartilage layer. After 12 weeks of implantation in a lapine model, the osteochondral defect was filled almost 100% with repair tissue and the HyA part was resorbed by 10 weeks. Zonal arrangement, including superficial, chondroid tissue, and interface layers, appeared to take place in the neo-cartilaginous tissue [57]. Significantly, the two-phase composite construct showed great integration at the interface between HyA and ICP components, ascribed to the local mechanical stress. The compressive load of the joint was applied and transmitted through the HyA sponge, ICP component and the bottom of the defect. The counteracting load was generated upwards and laterally, and induced the infiltration of ICP into the pores of the HyA sponge, leading to interface integration. Moreover, the laterally counteracting load was expanded laterally by the HyA sponge, causing a contact between the sponge and the surrounding native cartilage. Shao et al. [65] attempted to evaluate the repair potential in osteochondral defects (high load-bearing sites) by using hybrid scaffolds with MSCs in a lapine model. The scaffolds comprised PCL for the cartilage component and TCP-reinforced PCL for the bone component. The scaffolds were seeded with MSCs in each part and placed in osteochondral defects of lapine models by press-fit implantation. Repair tissues were evaluated at 12 and 24 weeks after implantation [65]. Compared with the control group (without cells), the PCL/PCL-TCP scaffolds showed superior repair ability in both bone and cartilage parts, indicating that the hybrid scaffolds provided sufficient support to new osteochondral tissue formation. From a period of 12–24 weeks, bone generation led to the firm integration to host tissue. After 24 weeks of implantation, subchondral bone filled the scaffold, which showed good integration with the host bone. Moreover, cartilage tissue exhibited GAG and collagen type II deposition. However, the cell arrangement in new cartilage tissue lacked zonal organization. The Young's modulus of the neotissue–polymer matrix construct at 24 weeks after implantation (∼0.76 MPa) approached that of normal cartilage of mature rabbits (∼0.81 MPa) [65]. The authors stated that this phenomenon could have been caused by the slow degradation of PCL-based hybrid scaffolds, which might leave remnants in the repair space over time and these remnants could help maintain sufficient mechanical support for subchondral bone and neocartilage. However, the possible changes in the scaffold and repair tissues over longer times of implantation were not shown in the study [65]. Neocartilage that deteriorates with time may happen, as shown in the study of Chu et al. [66]. Neocartilage in the region of repair tissue in rabbit decreased from 95% at 12 weeks to only 29% at 1-year follow-up [66, 67]. Scotti et al. [68] generated osteochondral composites including collagen-containing human chondrocytes for the cartilage part and fibrin gel for the bone part. It was shown that the separate cell pre-culture before generation of the composite allowed more efficient cartilaginous matrix accumulation than without pre-culture. Moreover, good biological bonding of the chondral scaffold with the bony scaffold by the cell-laid ECM occurred, indicating a suitable mechanical integrity at the interface and the possibility of effective surgical handling. Chen et al. [69] formulated a bilayered scaffold for simultaneous regeneration of cartilage and bone using gene delivery system to induce the growth of MSCs. Plasmid TGF-β1 activated chitosan/gelatin (CG) porous scaffold and Plasmid BMP-2 activated hydroxyapatite/chitosan/gelatin porous (HCG) scaffold were fabricated for the cartilage and bone regions, respectively. Both scaffolds were seeded with MSCs separately before integrated with fibrin glue. The interface of the bilayered scaffold showed good integration as a result of the interdigitation of the chondral phase into the osseous phase. After 2 weeks of co-culture, it was found that pTGF-β1 and pBMP-2 can induce MSCs in each layer to differentiate into chondrogenic and osteogenic-like cells. This demonstrated that the localized delivery system of DNA as tissue inductive factors in bilayered scaffolds could facilitate the differentiation of stem cells into specific cell types to develop complex tissues. An in vivo study in a rabbit model showed that the gene delivery system utilized in this bilayered construct simultaneously supported cartilage and bone regeneration, presenting a promising strategy for facilitating the development of osteochondral tissue [68].

Bottom Line: For reasons of the limitation in the capacity of articular cartilage to self-repair, it is essential to develop approaches based on suitable scaffolds made of appropriate engineered biomaterials.The combination of biodegradable polymers and bioactive ceramics in a variety of composite structures is promising in this area, whereby the fabrication methods, associated cells and signalling factors determine the success of the strategies.Additionally, cell sources and biological protein incorporation methods are discussed, addressing their interaction with scaffolds and highlighting the potential for creating a new generation of bilayered composite scaffolds that can mimic the native interfacial tissue properties, and are able to adapt to the biological environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Institute of Biomaterials, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen, Germany.

Show MeSH