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Concepts for Liver Segment Classification: Neither Old Ones nor New Ones, but a Comprehensive One.

Fasel JH, Schenk A - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: Concepts dealing with the subdivision of the human liver into independent vascular and biliary territories are applied routinely in radiological, surgical, and gastroenterological practice.Despite Couinaud's widely used eight-segments scheme, opinions on the issue differ considerably between authors.Possible clinical implications are addressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular Physiology and Metabolism, University Medical Center, Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Concepts dealing with the subdivision of the human liver into independent vascular and biliary territories are applied routinely in radiological, surgical, and gastroenterological practice. Despite Couinaud's widely used eight-segments scheme, opinions on the issue differ considerably between authors. The aim of this article is to illustrate the scientific basis for understanding and harmonizing inconsistencies between seemingly contradictory observations. Possible clinical implications are addressed.

No MeSH data available.


The concept of 5 or 6 sectors, as a result of partition of the right hemiliver into 3 (and not 2) sectors (called segments by Hjortsö). (a) Original figure.[19] (b) Reproduction on the same corrosion cast as in Figure 2b. This means that the seemingly contradiction between Figures 2b and 3b cannot be explained by anatomical variation.
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Figure 3: The concept of 5 or 6 sectors, as a result of partition of the right hemiliver into 3 (and not 2) sectors (called segments by Hjortsö). (a) Original figure.[19] (b) Reproduction on the same corrosion cast as in Figure 2b. This means that the seemingly contradiction between Figures 2b and 3b cannot be explained by anatomical variation.

Mentions: However, at this level of liver partition already, some authors disagree with the mainstream four-sector concept. Hjortsö[19] considered the RHL to included 3 (not 2) sectors; he called these territories ventrocranial, intermediate, and dorsocaudal segments [Figure 3a]. Kogure et al.,[20] and Cho et al.,[2122] have recently proposed this classification again.


Concepts for Liver Segment Classification: Neither Old Ones nor New Ones, but a Comprehensive One.

Fasel JH, Schenk A - J Clin Imaging Sci (2013)

The concept of 5 or 6 sectors, as a result of partition of the right hemiliver into 3 (and not 2) sectors (called segments by Hjortsö). (a) Original figure.[19] (b) Reproduction on the same corrosion cast as in Figure 2b. This means that the seemingly contradiction between Figures 2b and 3b cannot be explained by anatomical variation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3823389&req=5

Figure 3: The concept of 5 or 6 sectors, as a result of partition of the right hemiliver into 3 (and not 2) sectors (called segments by Hjortsö). (a) Original figure.[19] (b) Reproduction on the same corrosion cast as in Figure 2b. This means that the seemingly contradiction between Figures 2b and 3b cannot be explained by anatomical variation.
Mentions: However, at this level of liver partition already, some authors disagree with the mainstream four-sector concept. Hjortsö[19] considered the RHL to included 3 (not 2) sectors; he called these territories ventrocranial, intermediate, and dorsocaudal segments [Figure 3a]. Kogure et al.,[20] and Cho et al.,[2122] have recently proposed this classification again.

Bottom Line: Concepts dealing with the subdivision of the human liver into independent vascular and biliary territories are applied routinely in radiological, surgical, and gastroenterological practice.Despite Couinaud's widely used eight-segments scheme, opinions on the issue differ considerably between authors.Possible clinical implications are addressed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular Physiology and Metabolism, University Medical Center, Geneva, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
Concepts dealing with the subdivision of the human liver into independent vascular and biliary territories are applied routinely in radiological, surgical, and gastroenterological practice. Despite Couinaud's widely used eight-segments scheme, opinions on the issue differ considerably between authors. The aim of this article is to illustrate the scientific basis for understanding and harmonizing inconsistencies between seemingly contradictory observations. Possible clinical implications are addressed.

No MeSH data available.