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Peritoneal repairing cells: a type of bone marrow derived progenitor cells involved in mesothelial regeneration.

Carmona R, Cano E, Grueso E, Ruiz-Villalba A, Bera TK, Gaztambide J, Segovia JC, Muñoz-Chápuli R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2010)

Bottom Line: This was observed in the injured area as well as in the surrounding not-injured peritoneal surfaces.We suggest that PRC constitute a type of monocyte-derived cells, closely related with the tissue-repairing cells known as 'fibrocytes' and specifically involved in peritoneal reparation.Thus, our results constitute a synthesis of the different scenarios hitherto proposed about peritoneal regeneration, particularly recruitment of circulating progenitor cells and adhesion of free-floating coelomic cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Scanning electron microscopy of the peritoneal surface from a control, unoperated mouse (A), from the injured area 48 hrs after surgery (B) and from the contralateral area of the same mice (C). A higher magnification of the latter is shown in (D). The normal peritoneal surface is squamous and shows abundant microvilli. In the injured surface rounded cells covered by ruffles and microvilli are present. Some cells show different degrees of flattening (arrows). In the contralateral area shown in (C), the surface shows areas of mesothelial activation, with the cells bulging in the lumen and showing signs of detachment. These cells also show microvilli, as shown in (D) (arrow).
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fig04: Scanning electron microscopy of the peritoneal surface from a control, unoperated mouse (A), from the injured area 48 hrs after surgery (B) and from the contralateral area of the same mice (C). A higher magnification of the latter is shown in (D). The normal peritoneal surface is squamous and shows abundant microvilli. In the injured surface rounded cells covered by ruffles and microvilli are present. Some cells show different degrees of flattening (arrows). In the contralateral area shown in (C), the surface shows areas of mesothelial activation, with the cells bulging in the lumen and showing signs of detachment. These cells also show microvilli, as shown in (D) (arrow).

Mentions: The injured peritoneal wall, after 48 hrs, showed extensive signs of reparation, with cells adhered to the denudated surface and displaying a variable degree of flattening (arrows in Fig. 4B). Surprisingly the contralateral peritoneal surface (Fig. 4C and D) showed a clear difference as compared with the control (unoperated) mice (Fig. 4A) because of the presence of rounded cells, loosely attached to the peritoneal surface. These features were never observed in control unoperated mice.


Peritoneal repairing cells: a type of bone marrow derived progenitor cells involved in mesothelial regeneration.

Carmona R, Cano E, Grueso E, Ruiz-Villalba A, Bera TK, Gaztambide J, Segovia JC, Muñoz-Chápuli R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2010)

Scanning electron microscopy of the peritoneal surface from a control, unoperated mouse (A), from the injured area 48 hrs after surgery (B) and from the contralateral area of the same mice (C). A higher magnification of the latter is shown in (D). The normal peritoneal surface is squamous and shows abundant microvilli. In the injured surface rounded cells covered by ruffles and microvilli are present. Some cells show different degrees of flattening (arrows). In the contralateral area shown in (C), the surface shows areas of mesothelial activation, with the cells bulging in the lumen and showing signs of detachment. These cells also show microvilli, as shown in (D) (arrow).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3822632&req=5

fig04: Scanning electron microscopy of the peritoneal surface from a control, unoperated mouse (A), from the injured area 48 hrs after surgery (B) and from the contralateral area of the same mice (C). A higher magnification of the latter is shown in (D). The normal peritoneal surface is squamous and shows abundant microvilli. In the injured surface rounded cells covered by ruffles and microvilli are present. Some cells show different degrees of flattening (arrows). In the contralateral area shown in (C), the surface shows areas of mesothelial activation, with the cells bulging in the lumen and showing signs of detachment. These cells also show microvilli, as shown in (D) (arrow).
Mentions: The injured peritoneal wall, after 48 hrs, showed extensive signs of reparation, with cells adhered to the denudated surface and displaying a variable degree of flattening (arrows in Fig. 4B). Surprisingly the contralateral peritoneal surface (Fig. 4C and D) showed a clear difference as compared with the control (unoperated) mice (Fig. 4A) because of the presence of rounded cells, loosely attached to the peritoneal surface. These features were never observed in control unoperated mice.

Bottom Line: This was observed in the injured area as well as in the surrounding not-injured peritoneal surfaces.We suggest that PRC constitute a type of monocyte-derived cells, closely related with the tissue-repairing cells known as 'fibrocytes' and specifically involved in peritoneal reparation.Thus, our results constitute a synthesis of the different scenarios hitherto proposed about peritoneal regeneration, particularly recruitment of circulating progenitor cells and adhesion of free-floating coelomic cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus