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Myxococcus xanthus induces actinorhodin overproduction and aerial mycelium formation by Streptomyces coelicolor.

Pérez J, Muñoz-Dorado J, Braña AF, Shimkets LJ, Sevillano L, Santamaría RI - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Bottom Line: Interaction of the predatory myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus with the non-motile, antibiotic producer Streptomyces coelicolor was examined using a variety of experimental approaches.The interaction increases actinorhodin production by S. coelicolor up to 20-fold and triggers aerial mycelium production.These studies offer new clues about the expression of genes that remain silent or are expressed at low level in axenic cultures and open the possibility of overproducing compounds of biotechnological interest by using potent inducers synthesized by other bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain Area de Microbiología, Departamento de Biología Funcional, Facultad de Medicina, IUBA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.

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Analysis of the interaction between different mutants of S. coelicolor and M. xanthus DK1622 on CTT agar plates. Blue arrows point to M. xanthus cells moving towards S. coelicolor. Bars represent 2 mm.
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f5: Analysis of the interaction between different mutants of S. coelicolor and M. xanthus DK1622 on CTT agar plates. Blue arrows point to M. xanthus cells moving towards S. coelicolor. Bars represent 2 mm.

Mentions: To determine whether ACT production provides an advantage to S. coelicolor strains against M. xanthus predation, mutants impaired in the production of RED (M510), ACT (M511) or both antibiotics (M512) where used. ACT was produced by strains M145 (wild type) and M510 (Fig. 5). RED was detected in M145 and M511 (Fig. 5). Migration of M. xanthus DK1622 cells towards all the Streptomyces strains was observed. However, this migration was more evident with the Streptomyces strains that did not produce ACT (M511 and M512 strains). Myxococcus xanthus seemed to more aggressively attack strains lacking ACT (see the blue arrows in Fig. 5 taken after 200 h co‐culture). This observation predicted that strain M512 would be more sensitive to M. xanthus attack. However, the general appearance of the Streptomyces colonies suggested that the three mutants were as resistant to M. xanthus predation as the wt strain.


Myxococcus xanthus induces actinorhodin overproduction and aerial mycelium formation by Streptomyces coelicolor.

Pérez J, Muñoz-Dorado J, Braña AF, Shimkets LJ, Sevillano L, Santamaría RI - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Analysis of the interaction between different mutants of S. coelicolor and M. xanthus DK1622 on CTT agar plates. Blue arrows point to M. xanthus cells moving towards S. coelicolor. Bars represent 2 mm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818858&req=5

f5: Analysis of the interaction between different mutants of S. coelicolor and M. xanthus DK1622 on CTT agar plates. Blue arrows point to M. xanthus cells moving towards S. coelicolor. Bars represent 2 mm.
Mentions: To determine whether ACT production provides an advantage to S. coelicolor strains against M. xanthus predation, mutants impaired in the production of RED (M510), ACT (M511) or both antibiotics (M512) where used. ACT was produced by strains M145 (wild type) and M510 (Fig. 5). RED was detected in M145 and M511 (Fig. 5). Migration of M. xanthus DK1622 cells towards all the Streptomyces strains was observed. However, this migration was more evident with the Streptomyces strains that did not produce ACT (M511 and M512 strains). Myxococcus xanthus seemed to more aggressively attack strains lacking ACT (see the blue arrows in Fig. 5 taken after 200 h co‐culture). This observation predicted that strain M512 would be more sensitive to M. xanthus attack. However, the general appearance of the Streptomyces colonies suggested that the three mutants were as resistant to M. xanthus predation as the wt strain.

Bottom Line: Interaction of the predatory myxobacterium Myxococcus xanthus with the non-motile, antibiotic producer Streptomyces coelicolor was examined using a variety of experimental approaches.The interaction increases actinorhodin production by S. coelicolor up to 20-fold and triggers aerial mycelium production.These studies offer new clues about the expression of genes that remain silent or are expressed at low level in axenic cultures and open the possibility of overproducing compounds of biotechnological interest by using potent inducers synthesized by other bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada, Spain Area de Microbiología, Departamento de Biología Funcional, Facultad de Medicina, IUBA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus