Limits...
Crystal ball – 2011

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

In this feature, leading researchers in the field of microbial biotechnology speculate on the technical and conceptual developments that will drive innovative research and open new vistas over the next few years.

No MeSH data available.


A prototype warming chamber constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is being tested for refinement before deployment for an ecosystem manipulation experiment in a spruce – peat bog near Grand Rapids, MN, USA (https://mnspruce.ornl.gov/). Photo compliments of Paul Hanson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818853&req=5

f1: A prototype warming chamber constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is being tested for refinement before deployment for an ecosystem manipulation experiment in a spruce – peat bog near Grand Rapids, MN, USA (https://mnspruce.ornl.gov/). Photo compliments of Paul Hanson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Mentions: Two next‐generation ecosystem experiments are being planned for deployment that will shed light on these important processes. An experiment to expose a boreal forest – peat bog ecosystem in Grand Rapids, MN, USA to both warmer temperatures and elevated CO2 concentrations is under development using an innovative combination of belowground and aboveground warming technology (see Fig. 1) while also enriching the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere around the forest (Hanson et al., 2010). A second experiment is being considered for implementation in the permafrost in Alaska, USA (S.D. Wullschleger, pers. comm.). Both of these experiments will provide critical large‐scale process understanding to improve earth system models. But, they also offer unique opportunities for microbiologists to collaborate with plant biologists, ecologists and geologists. The scientific opportunities to explore biogeochemical cycles at multiple scales with modern biological, chemical and physical methods is unprecedented and will challenge us to develop new informatic tools to integrate these new data that span disciplines and scales. With these integrative studies we may begin to open up the proverbial black box and quantify important interfacial and molecular biogeochemical processes.


Crystal ball – 2011
A prototype warming chamber constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is being tested for refinement before deployment for an ecosystem manipulation experiment in a spruce – peat bog near Grand Rapids, MN, USA (https://mnspruce.ornl.gov/). Photo compliments of Paul Hanson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818853&req=5

f1: A prototype warming chamber constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory that is being tested for refinement before deployment for an ecosystem manipulation experiment in a spruce – peat bog near Grand Rapids, MN, USA (https://mnspruce.ornl.gov/). Photo compliments of Paul Hanson, Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
Mentions: Two next‐generation ecosystem experiments are being planned for deployment that will shed light on these important processes. An experiment to expose a boreal forest – peat bog ecosystem in Grand Rapids, MN, USA to both warmer temperatures and elevated CO2 concentrations is under development using an innovative combination of belowground and aboveground warming technology (see Fig. 1) while also enriching the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere around the forest (Hanson et al., 2010). A second experiment is being considered for implementation in the permafrost in Alaska, USA (S.D. Wullschleger, pers. comm.). Both of these experiments will provide critical large‐scale process understanding to improve earth system models. But, they also offer unique opportunities for microbiologists to collaborate with plant biologists, ecologists and geologists. The scientific opportunities to explore biogeochemical cycles at multiple scales with modern biological, chemical and physical methods is unprecedented and will challenge us to develop new informatic tools to integrate these new data that span disciplines and scales. With these integrative studies we may begin to open up the proverbial black box and quantify important interfacial and molecular biogeochemical processes.

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

In this feature, leading researchers in the field of microbial biotechnology speculate on the technical and conceptual developments that will drive innovative research and open new vistas over the next few years.

No MeSH data available.