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Use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the detection of glycemic elements in Indian medicinal plants.

Rai PK, Srivastava AK, Sharma B, Dhar P, Mishra AK, Watal G - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2013)

Bottom Line: Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique that is widely used for its simplicity and versatility.This review presents the most recent application of LIBS for detection of glycemic elements in medicinal plants.The characteristics of matrices, object analysis, use of laser system, and analytical performances with respect to Indian herbs are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of NMR, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India ; UJ Nanomaterials Science Research Group, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein, Johannesburg 2028, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The demand for interdisciplinary research is increasing in the new millennium to help us understand complex problems and find solutions by integrating the knowledge from different disciplines. The present review is an excellent example of this and shows how unique combination of physics, chemistry, and biological techniques can be used for the evaluation of Indian medicinal herbs used for treating diabetes mellitus. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique that is widely used for its simplicity and versatility. This review presents the most recent application of LIBS for detection of glycemic elements in medicinal plants. The characteristics of matrices, object analysis, use of laser system, and analytical performances with respect to Indian herbs are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Leucocyanidin (I) and pelargonidin (II) isolated from the bark of Ficus bengalensis show hypoglycemic activity.
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sch1: Leucocyanidin (I) and pelargonidin (II) isolated from the bark of Ficus bengalensis show hypoglycemic activity.

Mentions: Commonly known as “Indian Banyan Tree or Bur,” is distributed throughout India. A glycoside called bengalenoside was isolated from the bark and showed more potent hypoglycemic action compared to the crude ethanolic bark extract, and the activity being was half that of the synthetic drug tolbutamide [62]. Oral administration of bark extract showed significant antihyperglycemic effect in STZ diabetic rats by raising serum insulin levels. Leucocyanidin and pelargonidin compounds (Scheme 1) isolated from the bark have also shown hypoglycemic activity [63–65]. Most recently, the hypoglycemic as well as antidiabetic properties have been reported in aerial roots of this tree [66]. The LIBS results showed a higher concentration of Mg and Ca in aqueous extract of Ficus bengalensis as compared to other elements present.


Use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the detection of glycemic elements in Indian medicinal plants.

Rai PK, Srivastava AK, Sharma B, Dhar P, Mishra AK, Watal G - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2013)

Leucocyanidin (I) and pelargonidin (II) isolated from the bark of Ficus bengalensis show hypoglycemic activity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818838&req=5

sch1: Leucocyanidin (I) and pelargonidin (II) isolated from the bark of Ficus bengalensis show hypoglycemic activity.
Mentions: Commonly known as “Indian Banyan Tree or Bur,” is distributed throughout India. A glycoside called bengalenoside was isolated from the bark and showed more potent hypoglycemic action compared to the crude ethanolic bark extract, and the activity being was half that of the synthetic drug tolbutamide [62]. Oral administration of bark extract showed significant antihyperglycemic effect in STZ diabetic rats by raising serum insulin levels. Leucocyanidin and pelargonidin compounds (Scheme 1) isolated from the bark have also shown hypoglycemic activity [63–65]. Most recently, the hypoglycemic as well as antidiabetic properties have been reported in aerial roots of this tree [66]. The LIBS results showed a higher concentration of Mg and Ca in aqueous extract of Ficus bengalensis as compared to other elements present.

Bottom Line: Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique that is widely used for its simplicity and versatility.This review presents the most recent application of LIBS for detection of glycemic elements in medicinal plants.The characteristics of matrices, object analysis, use of laser system, and analytical performances with respect to Indian herbs are discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of NMR, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi 110029, India ; UJ Nanomaterials Science Research Group, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 17011, Doornfontein, Johannesburg 2028, South Africa.

ABSTRACT
The demand for interdisciplinary research is increasing in the new millennium to help us understand complex problems and find solutions by integrating the knowledge from different disciplines. The present review is an excellent example of this and shows how unique combination of physics, chemistry, and biological techniques can be used for the evaluation of Indian medicinal herbs used for treating diabetes mellitus. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a sensitive optical technique that is widely used for its simplicity and versatility. This review presents the most recent application of LIBS for detection of glycemic elements in medicinal plants. The characteristics of matrices, object analysis, use of laser system, and analytical performances with respect to Indian herbs are discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus