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Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) X-rays illustrating radial head multifragmentary fracture. One slice of the CT scan proves the bony tendon tear of the triceps by a young sports student, who was suffering from an elbow dislocation. (b) Postoperative X-rays demonstrating radial head reconstruction and stabilization. The bony tear of the triceps tendon was sutured to the olecranon tip. (c) Forty-eight weeks after trauma, the young athlete was not able to straighten the left elbow. Full range of motion was restored within 6 weeks by applying oral cortisone therapy with Prednisolon 5 mg tablets in decreasing dosage as described in Table 2.
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fig6: (a) X-rays illustrating radial head multifragmentary fracture. One slice of the CT scan proves the bony tendon tear of the triceps by a young sports student, who was suffering from an elbow dislocation. (b) Postoperative X-rays demonstrating radial head reconstruction and stabilization. The bony tear of the triceps tendon was sutured to the olecranon tip. (c) Forty-eight weeks after trauma, the young athlete was not able to straighten the left elbow. Full range of motion was restored within 6 weeks by applying oral cortisone therapy with Prednisolon 5 mg tablets in decreasing dosage as described in Table 2.

Mentions: From a basic research view, inflammatory reactions of the healing process are responsible for capsulitis and shrinkage of the capsula by SMA myofibroblasts [62]. A torn capsula will inflame and develop a kind of capsular adhesive during the healing process. Scar tissue formed by fibrocytes and myocytes may impede the desired healing process, particularly if an elbow is immobilized for 3 weeks after the trauma. According to our experience, elbows will also get stiff when immobilized for more than 3 weeks after the trauma. However, capsular fibrosis can be stopped and even reduced again by the oral administration of cortisol and spironolactone [63–65] (Table 2, Figures 6(a)–6(c)). Temporary elbow stiffness is a normal occurrence and should be treated with pain-free long-lasting flexion and extension exercises over a long period of time. In severe cases, cortisol and spironolactone may be administered additionally.


Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

(a) X-rays illustrating radial head multifragmentary fracture. One slice of the CT scan proves the bony tendon tear of the triceps by a young sports student, who was suffering from an elbow dislocation. (b) Postoperative X-rays demonstrating radial head reconstruction and stabilization. The bony tear of the triceps tendon was sutured to the olecranon tip. (c) Forty-eight weeks after trauma, the young athlete was not able to straighten the left elbow. Full range of motion was restored within 6 weeks by applying oral cortisone therapy with Prednisolon 5 mg tablets in decreasing dosage as described in Table 2.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818812&req=5

fig6: (a) X-rays illustrating radial head multifragmentary fracture. One slice of the CT scan proves the bony tendon tear of the triceps by a young sports student, who was suffering from an elbow dislocation. (b) Postoperative X-rays demonstrating radial head reconstruction and stabilization. The bony tear of the triceps tendon was sutured to the olecranon tip. (c) Forty-eight weeks after trauma, the young athlete was not able to straighten the left elbow. Full range of motion was restored within 6 weeks by applying oral cortisone therapy with Prednisolon 5 mg tablets in decreasing dosage as described in Table 2.
Mentions: From a basic research view, inflammatory reactions of the healing process are responsible for capsulitis and shrinkage of the capsula by SMA myofibroblasts [62]. A torn capsula will inflame and develop a kind of capsular adhesive during the healing process. Scar tissue formed by fibrocytes and myocytes may impede the desired healing process, particularly if an elbow is immobilized for 3 weeks after the trauma. According to our experience, elbows will also get stiff when immobilized for more than 3 weeks after the trauma. However, capsular fibrosis can be stopped and even reduced again by the oral administration of cortisol and spironolactone [63–65] (Table 2, Figures 6(a)–6(c)). Temporary elbow stiffness is a normal occurrence and should be treated with pain-free long-lasting flexion and extension exercises over a long period of time. In severe cases, cortisol and spironolactone may be administered additionally.

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus