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Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Isolated rupture of the anterior medial ulnar collateral ligament (aMUCL) by valgus stress trauma. The patient was typically suffering from a limited range of motion in flexion. Full range of motion with a stable elbow was restored with conservative treatment 10 weeks after trauma. (b) MRI proofed isolated aMUCL rupture of the photographed patient. The sagittal plane illustrated an inflammatory reaction. (c) The frontal plane demonstrated the rupture of the MUCL complex from its proximal insertion on the medial epicondyle humeri.
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fig5: (a) Isolated rupture of the anterior medial ulnar collateral ligament (aMUCL) by valgus stress trauma. The patient was typically suffering from a limited range of motion in flexion. Full range of motion with a stable elbow was restored with conservative treatment 10 weeks after trauma. (b) MRI proofed isolated aMUCL rupture of the photographed patient. The sagittal plane illustrated an inflammatory reaction. (c) The frontal plane demonstrated the rupture of the MUCL complex from its proximal insertion on the medial epicondyle humeri.

Mentions: Most of the knowledge on single MUCL lesions has been gained from examining athletes such as javelin throwers or handball players [41]. Chronic instability requires surgery including ligament augmentation [42]. In our experience, acute trauma patients with a valgus stress injury and a consecutive single MUCL lesion suffer from limited range of motion (Figure 5(a)). Two-dimensional X-ray images of the elbow often show no fractures with regular alignment. MRI illustrates in such cases single MUCL injury (Figures 5(b)-5(c)). However, patients unable to bend their elbow are usually in pain if they try to do so. Patients tend to extend their elbow and reject any flexion above 80°, which is a strong clinical marker for MUCL distortion or rupture. Bracing the elbow with a limited range of motion in flexion will lead to a pain-free stable elbow within 2 to 4 weeks or, in severe cases, up to 8 weeks.


Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

(a) Isolated rupture of the anterior medial ulnar collateral ligament (aMUCL) by valgus stress trauma. The patient was typically suffering from a limited range of motion in flexion. Full range of motion with a stable elbow was restored with conservative treatment 10 weeks after trauma. (b) MRI proofed isolated aMUCL rupture of the photographed patient. The sagittal plane illustrated an inflammatory reaction. (c) The frontal plane demonstrated the rupture of the MUCL complex from its proximal insertion on the medial epicondyle humeri.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818812&req=5

fig5: (a) Isolated rupture of the anterior medial ulnar collateral ligament (aMUCL) by valgus stress trauma. The patient was typically suffering from a limited range of motion in flexion. Full range of motion with a stable elbow was restored with conservative treatment 10 weeks after trauma. (b) MRI proofed isolated aMUCL rupture of the photographed patient. The sagittal plane illustrated an inflammatory reaction. (c) The frontal plane demonstrated the rupture of the MUCL complex from its proximal insertion on the medial epicondyle humeri.
Mentions: Most of the knowledge on single MUCL lesions has been gained from examining athletes such as javelin throwers or handball players [41]. Chronic instability requires surgery including ligament augmentation [42]. In our experience, acute trauma patients with a valgus stress injury and a consecutive single MUCL lesion suffer from limited range of motion (Figure 5(a)). Two-dimensional X-ray images of the elbow often show no fractures with regular alignment. MRI illustrates in such cases single MUCL injury (Figures 5(b)-5(c)). However, patients unable to bend their elbow are usually in pain if they try to do so. Patients tend to extend their elbow and reject any flexion above 80°, which is a strong clinical marker for MUCL distortion or rupture. Bracing the elbow with a limited range of motion in flexion will lead to a pain-free stable elbow within 2 to 4 weeks or, in severe cases, up to 8 weeks.

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus