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Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Isolated rupture of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) resulting in persistent posterolateral rotational instability (PLRI) in a patient who works as an anesthesiologist. She was not able to retract the speculum after trauma. The picture illustrates the intraoperative reconstruction of the proximal torn LUCL.
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fig4: Isolated rupture of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) resulting in persistent posterolateral rotational instability (PLRI) in a patient who works as an anesthesiologist. She was not able to retract the speculum after trauma. The picture illustrates the intraoperative reconstruction of the proximal torn LUCL.

Mentions: Radial head injuries should be handled with care, and possible injuries to the lateral ligament complex should be excluded. Some authors have suggested that the choice of treatment of singular radial head injuries should depend on the extent of fragment dislocation [35, 36]. In simple elbow dislocations, the radial column is often combined with a radial head injury type Mason II and rupture of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL). This common complication often results in persistent posteroradial instability and should be addressed by reconstructing the radial head and by augmenting the ruptured ligament complex [12] (Figure 4). Biomechanical investigations have shown that absence of the radial head induce rotatory laxity of 145% compared to intact elbow joints. Absence of the radial head and the coronoid process results in the deviation and dislocation of the joint, regardless of its collateral ligament status [37]. Biomechanical trials have shown that the lateral collateral ligament is the primary stabilizer to external rotation and posterolateral stabilization (Figure 2(a)). Reconstruction of the LUCL alone, even without the radial head, is beneficial.


Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Isolated rupture of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) resulting in persistent posterolateral rotational instability (PLRI) in a patient who works as an anesthesiologist. She was not able to retract the speculum after trauma. The picture illustrates the intraoperative reconstruction of the proximal torn LUCL.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818812&req=5

fig4: Isolated rupture of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL) resulting in persistent posterolateral rotational instability (PLRI) in a patient who works as an anesthesiologist. She was not able to retract the speculum after trauma. The picture illustrates the intraoperative reconstruction of the proximal torn LUCL.
Mentions: Radial head injuries should be handled with care, and possible injuries to the lateral ligament complex should be excluded. Some authors have suggested that the choice of treatment of singular radial head injuries should depend on the extent of fragment dislocation [35, 36]. In simple elbow dislocations, the radial column is often combined with a radial head injury type Mason II and rupture of the lateral ulnar collateral ligament (LUCL). This common complication often results in persistent posteroradial instability and should be addressed by reconstructing the radial head and by augmenting the ruptured ligament complex [12] (Figure 4). Biomechanical investigations have shown that absence of the radial head induce rotatory laxity of 145% compared to intact elbow joints. Absence of the radial head and the coronoid process results in the deviation and dislocation of the joint, regardless of its collateral ligament status [37]. Biomechanical trials have shown that the lateral collateral ligament is the primary stabilizer to external rotation and posterolateral stabilization (Figure 2(a)). Reconstruction of the LUCL alone, even without the radial head, is beneficial.

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus