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Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examination of the elbow joint under intensifier during 0-30-60-90° of varus and valgus stresses.
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fig3: Examination of the elbow joint under intensifier during 0-30-60-90° of varus and valgus stresses.

Mentions: We recommend the following procedure for testing for elbow ligamentous instability. The patient's arm should be positioned under the radiograph intensifier as shown in Figure 3. Humero-ulnar joints should be examined during valgus and varus stress tests at the flexion angles of 0°-30°-60°-90° under the radiograph intensifier (Figure 3). Instabilities become visible by a widened joint gap that can be documented by a printout. A standardized documentation may allow the specification of the injured ligaments (Table 1).


Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Examination of the elbow joint under intensifier during 0-30-60-90° of varus and valgus stresses.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818812&req=5

fig3: Examination of the elbow joint under intensifier during 0-30-60-90° of varus and valgus stresses.
Mentions: We recommend the following procedure for testing for elbow ligamentous instability. The patient's arm should be positioned under the radiograph intensifier as shown in Figure 3. Humero-ulnar joints should be examined during valgus and varus stress tests at the flexion angles of 0°-30°-60°-90° under the radiograph intensifier (Figure 3). Instabilities become visible by a widened joint gap that can be documented by a printout. A standardized documentation may allow the specification of the injured ligaments (Table 1).

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus