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Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) The combined mechanical function of MUCL, anteromedial facet of the olecranon and radial head in valgus, and external rotational stability are demonstrated. (b) The yellow spot on the anatomical preparation illustrates types I and II coronoid fractures. Type III fractures of the olecranon (green spot) involve the anterior MUCL, which result in sudden angular and translational instability of the elbow between 30° and 60°.
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fig2: (a) The combined mechanical function of MUCL, anteromedial facet of the olecranon and radial head in valgus, and external rotational stability are demonstrated. (b) The yellow spot on the anatomical preparation illustrates types I and II coronoid fractures. Type III fractures of the olecranon (green spot) involve the anterior MUCL, which result in sudden angular and translational instability of the elbow between 30° and 60°.

Mentions: The bony structures of the humeral trochlea sulcus and the connecting sigmoid notch of the olecranon have a buttress function and are the main stabilizing factor in varus and valgus stress and during rotational movements (Figure 1(b)). Caused by the semilunar surface of the capitulum humeri and the olecranon, the range of motion is limited in extension and flexion. Biomechanical trials have shown bony structures to be the main stabilizers of the elbow. 55% of varus stress is absorbed by bone compartments in full extension and even 75% at 90° of flexion. During varus stress, only minor support is given by capsular and ligamentous structures [5]. Valgus elbow stability depends on ligaments as well as on bony structures [6]. Experiments imitating coronoid fractures without any injuries to the ligaments as classified by Morrey have shown that resection of the radial head mainly influences valgus and external rotation, whereas coronoid deficiency results in varus laxity and posterior translation (Figure 2(a)). Overall, the radial head comprises approximately 40% of the stabilizing surface.


Elbow dislocations: a review ranging from soft tissue injuries to complex elbow fracture dislocations.

Englert C, Zellner J, Koller M, Nerlich M, Lenich A - Adv Orthop (2013)

(a) The combined mechanical function of MUCL, anteromedial facet of the olecranon and radial head in valgus, and external rotational stability are demonstrated. (b) The yellow spot on the anatomical preparation illustrates types I and II coronoid fractures. Type III fractures of the olecranon (green spot) involve the anterior MUCL, which result in sudden angular and translational instability of the elbow between 30° and 60°.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818812&req=5

fig2: (a) The combined mechanical function of MUCL, anteromedial facet of the olecranon and radial head in valgus, and external rotational stability are demonstrated. (b) The yellow spot on the anatomical preparation illustrates types I and II coronoid fractures. Type III fractures of the olecranon (green spot) involve the anterior MUCL, which result in sudden angular and translational instability of the elbow between 30° and 60°.
Mentions: The bony structures of the humeral trochlea sulcus and the connecting sigmoid notch of the olecranon have a buttress function and are the main stabilizing factor in varus and valgus stress and during rotational movements (Figure 1(b)). Caused by the semilunar surface of the capitulum humeri and the olecranon, the range of motion is limited in extension and flexion. Biomechanical trials have shown bony structures to be the main stabilizers of the elbow. 55% of varus stress is absorbed by bone compartments in full extension and even 75% at 90° of flexion. During varus stress, only minor support is given by capsular and ligamentous structures [5]. Valgus elbow stability depends on ligaments as well as on bony structures [6]. Experiments imitating coronoid fractures without any injuries to the ligaments as classified by Morrey have shown that resection of the radial head mainly influences valgus and external rotation, whereas coronoid deficiency results in varus laxity and posterior translation (Figure 2(a)). Overall, the radial head comprises approximately 40% of the stabilizing surface.

Bottom Line: This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations.Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports.Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Trauma Surgery, University Hospital Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
This review on elbow dislocations describes ligament and bone injuries as well as the typical injury mechanisms and the main classifications of elbow dislocations. Current treatment concepts of simple, that is, stable, or complex unstable elbow dislocations are outlined by means of case reports. Special emphasis is put on injuries to the medial ulnar collateral ligament (MUCL) and on posttraumatic elbow stiffness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus