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Syrian field hospitals: A creative solution in urban military conflict combat in Syria.

Sankari A, Atassi B, Sahloul MZ - Avicenna J Med (2013)

Bottom Line: Since the war started in Syria nearly two years ago several independent organizations reported the use of medicine as a weapon by the Syrian authorities, killing of doctors and arresting patients who were admitted to the hospitals for treatment.In year 2012 the World Health Organization (WHO) found nearly 50% of hospitals are not functioning due to lack of staff, equipment and medicine.This report highlights how the doctors in Syria are creative and courageous to risk their own lives to save thousands of innocent lives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit MI, United States ; Department of Medicine, Syrian American Medical Society, Detroit MI, United States.

ABSTRACT
Since the war started in Syria nearly two years ago several independent organizations reported the use of medicine as a weapon by the Syrian authorities, killing of doctors and arresting patients who were admitted to the hospitals for treatment. In year 2012 the World Health Organization (WHO) found nearly 50% of hospitals are not functioning due to lack of staff, equipment and medicine. This report highlights how the doctors in Syria are creative and courageous to risk their own lives to save thousands of innocent lives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A field hospital in Syria depicting how Syrian surgeons use flash lights in the operating room to save lives due to the lack of electricity and fuel
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Figure 1: A field hospital in Syria depicting how Syrian surgeons use flash lights in the operating room to save lives due to the lack of electricity and fuel

Mentions: In spite of operating often under fire and constant threat of shelling in austere environments using basic equipments [Table 1] without electricity, lights, diesel fuel, heating, blood transfusion, and basic labs, it is estimated that more than 270,000 patient's lives were saved by the Syrian Field Hospitals since the beginning of the conflict. Without electricity or diesel fuel for generators, Syrian surgeons used flash lights [Figure 1] and cell phones instead of surgical lights. Nurses used body heat to warm intravenous fluid before transfusing them to patients during and post surgeries. Anesthesiologists used intravenous sedation for major surgeries and old-style, hand-operated Ambu bag ventilation during and after surgeries. Tens of thousands of lives were saved, however it did not come without a price. It is estimated by Doctors Without Borders that at least 120 Syrian doctors, 65 medical aids, and 50 nurses have been killed and more than 469 doctors have been detained.[6] Thousands of patients lost their lives because they had no access to simple life-saving measures, while some of them bled to death.


Syrian field hospitals: A creative solution in urban military conflict combat in Syria.

Sankari A, Atassi B, Sahloul MZ - Avicenna J Med (2013)

A field hospital in Syria depicting how Syrian surgeons use flash lights in the operating room to save lives due to the lack of electricity and fuel
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818785&req=5

Figure 1: A field hospital in Syria depicting how Syrian surgeons use flash lights in the operating room to save lives due to the lack of electricity and fuel
Mentions: In spite of operating often under fire and constant threat of shelling in austere environments using basic equipments [Table 1] without electricity, lights, diesel fuel, heating, blood transfusion, and basic labs, it is estimated that more than 270,000 patient's lives were saved by the Syrian Field Hospitals since the beginning of the conflict. Without electricity or diesel fuel for generators, Syrian surgeons used flash lights [Figure 1] and cell phones instead of surgical lights. Nurses used body heat to warm intravenous fluid before transfusing them to patients during and post surgeries. Anesthesiologists used intravenous sedation for major surgeries and old-style, hand-operated Ambu bag ventilation during and after surgeries. Tens of thousands of lives were saved, however it did not come without a price. It is estimated by Doctors Without Borders that at least 120 Syrian doctors, 65 medical aids, and 50 nurses have been killed and more than 469 doctors have been detained.[6] Thousands of patients lost their lives because they had no access to simple life-saving measures, while some of them bled to death.

Bottom Line: Since the war started in Syria nearly two years ago several independent organizations reported the use of medicine as a weapon by the Syrian authorities, killing of doctors and arresting patients who were admitted to the hospitals for treatment.In year 2012 the World Health Organization (WHO) found nearly 50% of hospitals are not functioning due to lack of staff, equipment and medicine.This report highlights how the doctors in Syria are creative and courageous to risk their own lives to save thousands of innocent lives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit MI, United States ; Department of Medicine, Syrian American Medical Society, Detroit MI, United States.

ABSTRACT
Since the war started in Syria nearly two years ago several independent organizations reported the use of medicine as a weapon by the Syrian authorities, killing of doctors and arresting patients who were admitted to the hospitals for treatment. In year 2012 the World Health Organization (WHO) found nearly 50% of hospitals are not functioning due to lack of staff, equipment and medicine. This report highlights how the doctors in Syria are creative and courageous to risk their own lives to save thousands of innocent lives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus