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Intervention to improve the quality of life of a bottlenose dolphin that developed necrosis on the tail flukes.

Ueda K, Murakami M, Kato J, Miyahara H, Izumisawa Y - J Phys Ther Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: [Purpose, Case, and Methods] A female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity developed necrosis of the tail flukes.Although the diseased site healed after surgical resection, the loss of approximately 75% of the tail greatly affected her swimming performance.To restore swimming ability, we developed artificial tail flukes as a prosthetic swimming aid and provided physical therapy that included swimming training from postoperative day 1 to day 1427. [Results] The prosthetic enabled the dolphin to recover swimming ability almost to the level prior to disease onset, but even acquire applied movement, and reestablish social relationships, thus greatly improving the animal's quality of life. [Conclusion] The results clearly demonstrate that, as in postoperative rehabilitation in humans, the use of prosthetic devices in physical therapy can be beneficial for marine animals such as dolphins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium ; Research Center, Okinawa Churashima Foundation.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose, Case, and Methods] A female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity developed necrosis of the tail flukes. Although the diseased site healed after surgical resection, the loss of approximately 75% of the tail greatly affected her swimming performance. To restore swimming ability, we developed artificial tail flukes as a prosthetic swimming aid and provided physical therapy that included swimming training from postoperative day 1 to day 1427. [Results] The prosthetic enabled the dolphin to recover swimming ability almost to the level prior to disease onset, but even acquire applied movement, and reestablish social relationships, thus greatly improving the animal's quality of life. [Conclusion] The results clearly demonstrate that, as in postoperative rehabilitation in humans, the use of prosthetic devices in physical therapy can be beneficial for marine animals such as dolphins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of underwater behavior before making a jumpTail movements were videotaped and compared in slow motion. Compared with the movementof the base and the ends of a healthy dolphin's tail (upper panels), the ends of thedolphin's artificial tail flukes (lower panels) moved slowly and generated motionsdifferent from those of healthy dolphins.
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fig_006: Comparison of underwater behavior before making a jumpTail movements were videotaped and compared in slow motion. Compared with the movementof the base and the ends of a healthy dolphin's tail (upper panels), the ends of thedolphin's artificial tail flukes (lower panels) moved slowly and generated motionsdifferent from those of healthy dolphins.

Mentions: Video analysis of Fuji's underwater behavior and that of healthy dolphins showed that herswimming ability did not recover to the level of healthy dolphins even with the prosthesis.Healthy dolphins kicked their tail 4 times during period A, which lasted for 3 s (Fig. 6), while Fuji kicked up to 7 times over 4.5 s.Nonetheless, the dolphin's activities in daily life clearly improved.


Intervention to improve the quality of life of a bottlenose dolphin that developed necrosis on the tail flukes.

Ueda K, Murakami M, Kato J, Miyahara H, Izumisawa Y - J Phys Ther Sci (2013)

Comparison of underwater behavior before making a jumpTail movements were videotaped and compared in slow motion. Compared with the movementof the base and the ends of a healthy dolphin's tail (upper panels), the ends of thedolphin's artificial tail flukes (lower panels) moved slowly and generated motionsdifferent from those of healthy dolphins.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818761&req=5

fig_006: Comparison of underwater behavior before making a jumpTail movements were videotaped and compared in slow motion. Compared with the movementof the base and the ends of a healthy dolphin's tail (upper panels), the ends of thedolphin's artificial tail flukes (lower panels) moved slowly and generated motionsdifferent from those of healthy dolphins.
Mentions: Video analysis of Fuji's underwater behavior and that of healthy dolphins showed that herswimming ability did not recover to the level of healthy dolphins even with the prosthesis.Healthy dolphins kicked their tail 4 times during period A, which lasted for 3 s (Fig. 6), while Fuji kicked up to 7 times over 4.5 s.Nonetheless, the dolphin's activities in daily life clearly improved.

Bottom Line: [Purpose, Case, and Methods] A female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity developed necrosis of the tail flukes.Although the diseased site healed after surgical resection, the loss of approximately 75% of the tail greatly affected her swimming performance.To restore swimming ability, we developed artificial tail flukes as a prosthetic swimming aid and provided physical therapy that included swimming training from postoperative day 1 to day 1427. [Results] The prosthetic enabled the dolphin to recover swimming ability almost to the level prior to disease onset, but even acquire applied movement, and reestablish social relationships, thus greatly improving the animal's quality of life. [Conclusion] The results clearly demonstrate that, as in postoperative rehabilitation in humans, the use of prosthetic devices in physical therapy can be beneficial for marine animals such as dolphins.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium ; Research Center, Okinawa Churashima Foundation.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose, Case, and Methods] A female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity developed necrosis of the tail flukes. Although the diseased site healed after surgical resection, the loss of approximately 75% of the tail greatly affected her swimming performance. To restore swimming ability, we developed artificial tail flukes as a prosthetic swimming aid and provided physical therapy that included swimming training from postoperative day 1 to day 1427. [Results] The prosthetic enabled the dolphin to recover swimming ability almost to the level prior to disease onset, but even acquire applied movement, and reestablish social relationships, thus greatly improving the animal's quality of life. [Conclusion] The results clearly demonstrate that, as in postoperative rehabilitation in humans, the use of prosthetic devices in physical therapy can be beneficial for marine animals such as dolphins.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus