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Wii-based Balance Therapy to Improve Balance Function of Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study.

Tarakci D, Ozdincler AR, Tarakci E, Tutuncuoglu F, Ozmen M - J Phys Ther Sci (2013)

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacacy of Wii-based balance therapy for children with ambulatory cerebral palsy. [Subjects] This pilot study design included fourteen ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy (11 males, 3 females; mean age 12.07 ± 3.36 years). [Methods] Balance functions before and after treatment were evaluated using one leg standing, the functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the 6-minute walking test.The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities,and supervised and supported the patients during the therapy sessions.Statistically significant improvements were found in all outcome measures after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the Nintendo(®) Wii Fit provides a safe, enjoyable, suitable and effective method that can be added to conventional treatments to improve the static balance of patients with cerebral palsy; however, further work is required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Institude of Health Science, Istanbul University.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] Cerebral palsy is a sensorimotor disorder that affects the control of posture and movement. The Nintendo(®) Wii Fit offers an inexpensive, enjoyable, suitable alternative to more complex systems for children with cerebral palsy. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacacy of Wii-based balance therapy for children with ambulatory cerebral palsy. [Subjects] This pilot study design included fourteen ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy (11 males, 3 females; mean age 12.07 ± 3.36 years). [Methods] Balance functions before and after treatment were evaluated using one leg standing, the functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the 6-minute walking test. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities,and supervised and supported the patients during the therapy sessions. Exercises were performed in a standardized program 2 times a week for 12 weeks. [Results] Balance ability of every patient improved. Statistically significant improvements were found in all outcome measures after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the Nintendo(®) Wii Fit provides a safe, enjoyable, suitable and effective method that can be added to conventional treatments to improve the static balance of patients with cerebral palsy; however, further work is required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Progress of study participants
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fig_001: Progress of study participants

Mentions: Fourteen patients with CP (3 girls, 11 boys) with an age range of 5–17 participated in thisstudy (Fig. 1). The enrollment period was betweenDecember 2011 and June 2012. The patients were recruited from the pediatric neurologyoutpatient clinic of the Department of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, IstanbulUniversity, and were diagnosed with CP. Participants had normal or mild level intellectualdisability according to their health records. Exclusion criteria were the presence ofepilepsy, Gross Motor Function Classification System Expanded and Revised(GMFMCS-ER) level 4 or 5, spasticity of 3 or more according to ModifiedAshworth Scale in the lower extremities, and inability to cooperate with exercise ormeasurement. All patients and their parents were informed about the study, and writteninformed consent was obtained from the parents of the patients. The study was approved bythe Ethics Committee of Istanbul University and was conducted in accordance with theDecleration of Helsinki. A demographic data form was filled in by a physiotherapist.Patients' weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated as theweight divided by the square of the height. Clinical features such as disease duration, andthe subtype of CP were assessed by a pediatric neurologist.


Wii-based Balance Therapy to Improve Balance Function of Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study.

Tarakci D, Ozdincler AR, Tarakci E, Tutuncuoglu F, Ozmen M - J Phys Ther Sci (2013)

Progress of study participants
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818755&req=5

fig_001: Progress of study participants
Mentions: Fourteen patients with CP (3 girls, 11 boys) with an age range of 5–17 participated in thisstudy (Fig. 1). The enrollment period was betweenDecember 2011 and June 2012. The patients were recruited from the pediatric neurologyoutpatient clinic of the Department of Pediatric Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, IstanbulUniversity, and were diagnosed with CP. Participants had normal or mild level intellectualdisability according to their health records. Exclusion criteria were the presence ofepilepsy, Gross Motor Function Classification System Expanded and Revised(GMFMCS-ER) level 4 or 5, spasticity of 3 or more according to ModifiedAshworth Scale in the lower extremities, and inability to cooperate with exercise ormeasurement. All patients and their parents were informed about the study, and writteninformed consent was obtained from the parents of the patients. The study was approved bythe Ethics Committee of Istanbul University and was conducted in accordance with theDecleration of Helsinki. A demographic data form was filled in by a physiotherapist.Patients' weight and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) was calculated as theweight divided by the square of the height. Clinical features such as disease duration, andthe subtype of CP were assessed by a pediatric neurologist.

Bottom Line: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacacy of Wii-based balance therapy for children with ambulatory cerebral palsy. [Subjects] This pilot study design included fourteen ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy (11 males, 3 females; mean age 12.07 ± 3.36 years). [Methods] Balance functions before and after treatment were evaluated using one leg standing, the functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the 6-minute walking test.The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities,and supervised and supported the patients during the therapy sessions.Statistically significant improvements were found in all outcome measures after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the Nintendo(®) Wii Fit provides a safe, enjoyable, suitable and effective method that can be added to conventional treatments to improve the static balance of patients with cerebral palsy; however, further work is required.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Program of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Institude of Health Science, Istanbul University.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] Cerebral palsy is a sensorimotor disorder that affects the control of posture and movement. The Nintendo(®) Wii Fit offers an inexpensive, enjoyable, suitable alternative to more complex systems for children with cerebral palsy. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacacy of Wii-based balance therapy for children with ambulatory cerebral palsy. [Subjects] This pilot study design included fourteen ambulatory patients with cerebral palsy (11 males, 3 females; mean age 12.07 ± 3.36 years). [Methods] Balance functions before and after treatment were evaluated using one leg standing, the functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the 6-minute walking test. The physiotherapist prescribed the Wii Fit activities,and supervised and supported the patients during the therapy sessions. Exercises were performed in a standardized program 2 times a week for 12 weeks. [Results] Balance ability of every patient improved. Statistically significant improvements were found in all outcome measures after 12 weeks. [Conclusion] The results suggest that the Nintendo(®) Wii Fit provides a safe, enjoyable, suitable and effective method that can be added to conventional treatments to improve the static balance of patients with cerebral palsy; however, further work is required.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus