Limits...
The retraction penalty: evidence from the Web of Science.

Lu SF, Jin GZ, Uzzi B, Jones B - Sci Rep (2013)

Bottom Line: Scientific articles are retracted at increasing rates, with the highest rates among top journals.Importantly, however, citation losses among prior work disappear when authors self-report the error.Our analyses and results span the range of scientific disciplines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Simon School of Business, University of Rochester.

ABSTRACT
Scientific articles are retracted at increasing rates, with the highest rates among top journals. Here we show that a single retraction triggers citation losses through an author's prior body of work. Compared to closely-matched control papers, citations fall by an average of 6.9% per year for each prior publication. These chain reactions are sustained on authors' papers (a) published up to a decade earlier and (b) connected within the authors' own citation network by up to 4 degrees of separation from the retracted publication. Importantly, however, citation losses among prior work disappear when authors self-report the error. Our analyses and results span the range of scientific disciplines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of retraction on authors' prior body of work.Citations losses for prior work, compared to control papers, are presented after (a) self-reported retractions and (b) non-self-reported retractions. Orange lines indicate mean citation losses and dashed lines present 95% confidence intervals. After non-self-reported retractions, the authors' prior work loses 12.5% (p < .0001) of citations per year per prior publication five or more years after the retraction event, compared to control papers. By contrast, citation losses for the authors' prior body of work do not appear after self-reported retractions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818648&req=5

f3: Effect of retraction on authors' prior body of work.Citations losses for prior work, compared to control papers, are presented after (a) self-reported retractions and (b) non-self-reported retractions. Orange lines indicate mean citation losses and dashed lines present 95% confidence intervals. After non-self-reported retractions, the authors' prior work loses 12.5% (p < .0001) of citations per year per prior publication five or more years after the retraction event, compared to control papers. By contrast, citation losses for the authors' prior body of work do not appear after self-reported retractions.

Mentions: Figure 3 presents our main analysis, examining retraction effects on scientists' prior work. To isolate the effect of single retractions, we exclude cases where authors have multiple retractions, leaving 667 retracted papers and 1,737 authors with prior work. We build the sample of prior work using the WOS database. Specifically, we trace citations from each retracted article to prior articles by the same author (a 1st degree self-citation), citations from these prior articles to other prior articles by the same author (a 2nd degree self-citation), and so on up to the 11th degree, at which point additional prior work is no longer revealed. We identify additional prior publications by tracing forward this citation network – locating papers by the same author that cite these past publications. The average number of prior articles per author generated is 25.9, creating a sample of 45,039 prior papers. Note that none of the prior work was itself retracted.


The retraction penalty: evidence from the Web of Science.

Lu SF, Jin GZ, Uzzi B, Jones B - Sci Rep (2013)

Effect of retraction on authors' prior body of work.Citations losses for prior work, compared to control papers, are presented after (a) self-reported retractions and (b) non-self-reported retractions. Orange lines indicate mean citation losses and dashed lines present 95% confidence intervals. After non-self-reported retractions, the authors' prior work loses 12.5% (p < .0001) of citations per year per prior publication five or more years after the retraction event, compared to control papers. By contrast, citation losses for the authors' prior body of work do not appear after self-reported retractions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818648&req=5

f3: Effect of retraction on authors' prior body of work.Citations losses for prior work, compared to control papers, are presented after (a) self-reported retractions and (b) non-self-reported retractions. Orange lines indicate mean citation losses and dashed lines present 95% confidence intervals. After non-self-reported retractions, the authors' prior work loses 12.5% (p < .0001) of citations per year per prior publication five or more years after the retraction event, compared to control papers. By contrast, citation losses for the authors' prior body of work do not appear after self-reported retractions.
Mentions: Figure 3 presents our main analysis, examining retraction effects on scientists' prior work. To isolate the effect of single retractions, we exclude cases where authors have multiple retractions, leaving 667 retracted papers and 1,737 authors with prior work. We build the sample of prior work using the WOS database. Specifically, we trace citations from each retracted article to prior articles by the same author (a 1st degree self-citation), citations from these prior articles to other prior articles by the same author (a 2nd degree self-citation), and so on up to the 11th degree, at which point additional prior work is no longer revealed. We identify additional prior publications by tracing forward this citation network – locating papers by the same author that cite these past publications. The average number of prior articles per author generated is 25.9, creating a sample of 45,039 prior papers. Note that none of the prior work was itself retracted.

Bottom Line: Scientific articles are retracted at increasing rates, with the highest rates among top journals.Importantly, however, citation losses among prior work disappear when authors self-report the error.Our analyses and results span the range of scientific disciplines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Simon School of Business, University of Rochester.

ABSTRACT
Scientific articles are retracted at increasing rates, with the highest rates among top journals. Here we show that a single retraction triggers citation losses through an author's prior body of work. Compared to closely-matched control papers, citations fall by an average of 6.9% per year for each prior publication. These chain reactions are sustained on authors' papers (a) published up to a decade earlier and (b) connected within the authors' own citation network by up to 4 degrees of separation from the retracted publication. Importantly, however, citation losses among prior work disappear when authors self-report the error. Our analyses and results span the range of scientific disciplines.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus