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Development of a brief instrument for assessing healthcare employee satisfaction in a low-income setting.

Alpern R, Canavan ME, Thompson JT, McNatt Z, Tatek D, Lindfield T, Bradley EH - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: We found support for content validity, as data from the 18 responses factored into three factors, which we characterized as 1) relationship with management and supervisors, 2) job content, and 3) relationships with coworkers.Summary scores for two factors (relationship with management and supervisors and job content) were significantly associated (P-value, <0.001) with the two overall satisfaction items.The use of the SEHC survey in Ethiopian healthcare facilities has ample leadership support, which is essential for addressing problems that reduce staff satisfaction and exacerbate excessive workforce shortages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ethiopia is one of 57 countries identified by the World Health Report 2006 as having a severely limited number of health care professionals. In recognition of this shortage, the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health, through the Ethiopian Hospital Management Initiative, prioritized the need to improve retention of health care workers. Accordingly, we sought to develop the Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) survey for use in hospitals and health centers throughout Ethiopia.

Methods: Literature reviews and cognitive interviews were used to generate a staff satisfaction survey for use in the Ethiopian healthcare setting. We pretested the survey in each of the six hospitals and four health centers across Ethiopia (98% response rate). We assessed content validity and convergent validity using factor analysis and examined reliability using the Cronbach alpha coefficients to assess internal consistency. The final survey was comprised of 18 questions about specific aspects of an individual's work and two overall staff satisfaction questions.

Results: We found support for content validity, as data from the 18 responses factored into three factors, which we characterized as 1) relationship with management and supervisors, 2) job content, and 3) relationships with coworkers. Summary scores for two factors (relationship with management and supervisors and job content) were significantly associated (P-value, <0.001) with the two overall satisfaction items. Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed good to excellent internal consistency (Cronbach alpha coefficients >0.70) for the items in the three summary scores.

Conclusions: The introduction of consistent and reliable measures of staff satisfaction is crucial to understand and improve employee retention rates, which threaten the successful achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in low-income countries. The use of the SEHC survey in Ethiopian healthcare facilities has ample leadership support, which is essential for addressing problems that reduce staff satisfaction and exacerbate excessive workforce shortages.

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Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) Survey (English).
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pone-0079053-g001: Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) Survey (English).

Mentions: Before piloting, we distributed the survey among relevant stakeholders: the Ministry of Health, Black Lion Hospital (the largest hospital in the country), MSD and CHAI. Based on their suggestions, we made some adjustments, including eliminating, adding, and modifying questions and their order. The final survey was translated into three different languages (Amharic, Oromifa, and Tigrinya) and approved by MSD. Questions focused on relationships with management and supervisors, job content, and relationships with coworkers (Figure 1).


Development of a brief instrument for assessing healthcare employee satisfaction in a low-income setting.

Alpern R, Canavan ME, Thompson JT, McNatt Z, Tatek D, Lindfield T, Bradley EH - PLoS ONE (2013)

Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) Survey (English).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818514&req=5

pone-0079053-g001: Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) Survey (English).
Mentions: Before piloting, we distributed the survey among relevant stakeholders: the Ministry of Health, Black Lion Hospital (the largest hospital in the country), MSD and CHAI. Based on their suggestions, we made some adjustments, including eliminating, adding, and modifying questions and their order. The final survey was translated into three different languages (Amharic, Oromifa, and Tigrinya) and approved by MSD. Questions focused on relationships with management and supervisors, job content, and relationships with coworkers (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: We found support for content validity, as data from the 18 responses factored into three factors, which we characterized as 1) relationship with management and supervisors, 2) job content, and 3) relationships with coworkers.Summary scores for two factors (relationship with management and supervisors and job content) were significantly associated (P-value, <0.001) with the two overall satisfaction items.The use of the SEHC survey in Ethiopian healthcare facilities has ample leadership support, which is essential for addressing problems that reduce staff satisfaction and exacerbate excessive workforce shortages.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Ethiopia is one of 57 countries identified by the World Health Report 2006 as having a severely limited number of health care professionals. In recognition of this shortage, the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health, through the Ethiopian Hospital Management Initiative, prioritized the need to improve retention of health care workers. Accordingly, we sought to develop the Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) survey for use in hospitals and health centers throughout Ethiopia.

Methods: Literature reviews and cognitive interviews were used to generate a staff satisfaction survey for use in the Ethiopian healthcare setting. We pretested the survey in each of the six hospitals and four health centers across Ethiopia (98% response rate). We assessed content validity and convergent validity using factor analysis and examined reliability using the Cronbach alpha coefficients to assess internal consistency. The final survey was comprised of 18 questions about specific aspects of an individual's work and two overall staff satisfaction questions.

Results: We found support for content validity, as data from the 18 responses factored into three factors, which we characterized as 1) relationship with management and supervisors, 2) job content, and 3) relationships with coworkers. Summary scores for two factors (relationship with management and supervisors and job content) were significantly associated (P-value, <0.001) with the two overall satisfaction items. Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed good to excellent internal consistency (Cronbach alpha coefficients >0.70) for the items in the three summary scores.

Conclusions: The introduction of consistent and reliable measures of staff satisfaction is crucial to understand and improve employee retention rates, which threaten the successful achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in low-income countries. The use of the SEHC survey in Ethiopian healthcare facilities has ample leadership support, which is essential for addressing problems that reduce staff satisfaction and exacerbate excessive workforce shortages.

Show MeSH