Limits...
Distinct phyllosphere bacterial communities on Arabidopsis wax mutant leaves.

Reisberg EE, Hildebrandt U, Riederer M, Hentschel U - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The chemical distinctness of the mutant wax phenotypes was confirmed by gas chromatographic measurements.Microbial community analyses revealed bacterial phylotypes that were ubiquitously present on all plant lines (termed "core" community) while others were positively or negatively affected by the wax mutant phenotype (termed "plant line-specific" community).We conclude from this study that plant cuticular wax composition can affect the community composition of phyllosphere bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Department of Botany II, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute for Biological Sciences, Würzburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The phyllosphere of plants is inhabited by diverse microorganisms, however, the factors shaping their community composition are not fully elucidated. The plant cuticle represents the initial contact surface between microorganisms and the plant. We thus aimed to investigate whether mutations in the cuticular wax biosynthesis would affect the diversity of the phyllosphere microbiota. A set of four Arabidopsis thaliana eceriferum mutants (cer1, cer6, cer9, cer16) and their respective wild type (Landsberg erecta) were subjected to an outdoor growth period and analysed towards this purpose. The chemical distinctness of the mutant wax phenotypes was confirmed by gas chromatographic measurements. Next generation amplicon pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities showed distinct community patterns. This observation was supported by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis experiments. Microbial community analyses revealed bacterial phylotypes that were ubiquitously present on all plant lines (termed "core" community) while others were positively or negatively affected by the wax mutant phenotype (termed "plant line-specific" community). We conclude from this study that plant cuticular wax composition can affect the community composition of phyllosphere bacteria.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

OTU level resolution of plant line resident bacterial communities.A heatmap of the resident community OTUs of the five plant lines under investigation (present = dark blue, absent = light blue) is shown. The closest possible taxonomic affiliation is given. Grey writing indicates that these taxa were identified as chimeras in either the Greengenes or the Silva_r108 reference dataset but not in both. The six ubiquitously present OTUs are highlighted in dark red and the OTUs that are present in 14/15 samples are marked in light red (“core” community). All taxa that were found in at least one plant line and were absent from at least one other plant line are highlighted in yellow (“plant line-specific” community). OTUs marked with “+” also contained highest sequence counts (Tab.S3).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818481&req=5

pone-0078613-g004: OTU level resolution of plant line resident bacterial communities.A heatmap of the resident community OTUs of the five plant lines under investigation (present = dark blue, absent = light blue) is shown. The closest possible taxonomic affiliation is given. Grey writing indicates that these taxa were identified as chimeras in either the Greengenes or the Silva_r108 reference dataset but not in both. The six ubiquitously present OTUs are highlighted in dark red and the OTUs that are present in 14/15 samples are marked in light red (“core” community). All taxa that were found in at least one plant line and were absent from at least one other plant line are highlighted in yellow (“plant line-specific” community). OTUs marked with “+” also contained highest sequence counts (Tab.S3).

Mentions: Of the 79 OTUs forming the resident communities, six were present in all sampled communities (highlighted in red) and seven additional OTUs were present in all but one replicate (highlighted in light red), (Fig.4). These 13 nearly ubiquitously present OTUs were considered as the resident “core” community (Tab.2). Among the ubiquitous OTUs were also several that contained highest sequence read counts (indicated by a cross, Fig.4, Tab.S2). 35 OTUs were differentially present on the plant lines under investigation which means that they were present in all replicates of at least one plant line, but were absent in all replicates of at least one other plant line (highlighted in yellow). These OTUs were defined as the “plant line-specific” community (Tab.2). A dendrogram based on similarities showed a coherent clustering of the replicates among the five plant line resident communities (Fig.4 top).


Distinct phyllosphere bacterial communities on Arabidopsis wax mutant leaves.

Reisberg EE, Hildebrandt U, Riederer M, Hentschel U - PLoS ONE (2013)

OTU level resolution of plant line resident bacterial communities.A heatmap of the resident community OTUs of the five plant lines under investigation (present = dark blue, absent = light blue) is shown. The closest possible taxonomic affiliation is given. Grey writing indicates that these taxa were identified as chimeras in either the Greengenes or the Silva_r108 reference dataset but not in both. The six ubiquitously present OTUs are highlighted in dark red and the OTUs that are present in 14/15 samples are marked in light red (“core” community). All taxa that were found in at least one plant line and were absent from at least one other plant line are highlighted in yellow (“plant line-specific” community). OTUs marked with “+” also contained highest sequence counts (Tab.S3).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818481&req=5

pone-0078613-g004: OTU level resolution of plant line resident bacterial communities.A heatmap of the resident community OTUs of the five plant lines under investigation (present = dark blue, absent = light blue) is shown. The closest possible taxonomic affiliation is given. Grey writing indicates that these taxa were identified as chimeras in either the Greengenes or the Silva_r108 reference dataset but not in both. The six ubiquitously present OTUs are highlighted in dark red and the OTUs that are present in 14/15 samples are marked in light red (“core” community). All taxa that were found in at least one plant line and were absent from at least one other plant line are highlighted in yellow (“plant line-specific” community). OTUs marked with “+” also contained highest sequence counts (Tab.S3).
Mentions: Of the 79 OTUs forming the resident communities, six were present in all sampled communities (highlighted in red) and seven additional OTUs were present in all but one replicate (highlighted in light red), (Fig.4). These 13 nearly ubiquitously present OTUs were considered as the resident “core” community (Tab.2). Among the ubiquitous OTUs were also several that contained highest sequence read counts (indicated by a cross, Fig.4, Tab.S2). 35 OTUs were differentially present on the plant lines under investigation which means that they were present in all replicates of at least one plant line, but were absent in all replicates of at least one other plant line (highlighted in yellow). These OTUs were defined as the “plant line-specific” community (Tab.2). A dendrogram based on similarities showed a coherent clustering of the replicates among the five plant line resident communities (Fig.4 top).

Bottom Line: The chemical distinctness of the mutant wax phenotypes was confirmed by gas chromatographic measurements.Microbial community analyses revealed bacterial phylotypes that were ubiquitously present on all plant lines (termed "core" community) while others were positively or negatively affected by the wax mutant phenotype (termed "plant line-specific" community).We conclude from this study that plant cuticular wax composition can affect the community composition of phyllosphere bacteria.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Würzburg, Department of Botany II, Julius-von-Sachs-Institute for Biological Sciences, Würzburg, Germany.

ABSTRACT
The phyllosphere of plants is inhabited by diverse microorganisms, however, the factors shaping their community composition are not fully elucidated. The plant cuticle represents the initial contact surface between microorganisms and the plant. We thus aimed to investigate whether mutations in the cuticular wax biosynthesis would affect the diversity of the phyllosphere microbiota. A set of four Arabidopsis thaliana eceriferum mutants (cer1, cer6, cer9, cer16) and their respective wild type (Landsberg erecta) were subjected to an outdoor growth period and analysed towards this purpose. The chemical distinctness of the mutant wax phenotypes was confirmed by gas chromatographic measurements. Next generation amplicon pyrosequencing of the bacterial communities showed distinct community patterns. This observation was supported by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis experiments. Microbial community analyses revealed bacterial phylotypes that were ubiquitously present on all plant lines (termed "core" community) while others were positively or negatively affected by the wax mutant phenotype (termed "plant line-specific" community). We conclude from this study that plant cuticular wax composition can affect the community composition of phyllosphere bacteria.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus