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Development of a serial order in speech constrained by articulatory coordination.

Oohashi H, Watanabe H, Taga G - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops.In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends.These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Education, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan ; Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Koujimachi Business Center, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Universal linguistic constraints seem to govern the organization of sound sequences in words. However, our understanding of the origin and development of these constraints is incomplete. One possibility is that the development of neuromuscular control of articulators acts as a constraint for the emergence of sequences in words. Repetitions of the same consonant observed in early infancy and an increase in variation of consonantal sequences over months of age have been interpreted as a consequence of the development of neuromuscular control. Yet, it is not clear how sequential coordination of articulators such as lips, tongue apex and tongue dorsum constrains sequences of labial, coronal and dorsal consonants in words over the course of development. We examined longitudinal development of consonant-vowel-consonant(-vowel) sequences produced by Japanese children between 7 and 60 months of age. The sequences were classified according to places of articulation for corresponding consonants. The analyses of individual and group data show that infants prefer repetitive and fronting articulations, as shown in previous studies. Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops. In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends. These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

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The developmental changes of durations of CVCV sequences in Japanese children’s speech.The solid and dash lines denote mean durations of CVCV sequences and ± 1 standard deviations obtained from the group data. The blue, red and gray markers show the individual analysis for the Japanese children denoting means duration of CVCV sequences.
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pone-0078600-g003: The developmental changes of durations of CVCV sequences in Japanese children’s speech.The solid and dash lines denote mean durations of CVCV sequences and ± 1 standard deviations obtained from the group data. The blue, red and gray markers show the individual analysis for the Japanese children denoting means duration of CVCV sequences.

Mentions: For the developmental changes in the preference for the direction of articulations (Figure 2ii), although values of the fronting index fluctuated over time, both children showed early preference to the fronting patterns. This preference exists around 12 months and seems to decrease after 18 months (R2 = 0.670 and 0.158 for child B and C, respectively). For the development of intra-organ articulations (Figure 2iii), we obtained a developmental curve (R2 = 0.833 and 0.278 for child B and C, respectively). For the development of inter-organ articulations (Figure 2iv), we obtained two developmental curves (Figure 2iv), that is, CLVCC + CCVCL (R2 = 0.708 and 0.268 for child B and C, respectively) and CLVCD + CDVCL (R2 = 0.468 and 0.664 for child B and C, respectively). For child B, normalized ratios of intra-articulatory development were initially higher than those of inter-articulatory development (labial and coronal, and labial and dorsal consonants patterns). Yet, once the ratios of each of labial-coronal and labial-dorsal consonants patterns exceeded those of intra-organ articulations at 19.1 and 14.2 months of age, respectively, they rapidly peaked at 27.6 and 25.1 months of age, respectively. Although actual normalized ratios of child B and C differ from each others, based on patterns of the intersectional and peak months for the intra- and inter-organ articulations, the child C showed a similar pattern of changes, that is, each of the inter-organ articulations exceeded intra-organ ones at 15.1 and 21.0 months of age, respectively, and rapidly peaked at 21.1 and 25.3 months of age, respectively. In addition, we also analyzed the developmental changes in speed of CVCV articulation. Both children showed peaks in the mean duration of CVCV around 18 months after which the value gradually decreased (Figure 3).


Development of a serial order in speech constrained by articulatory coordination.

Oohashi H, Watanabe H, Taga G - PLoS ONE (2013)

The developmental changes of durations of CVCV sequences in Japanese children’s speech.The solid and dash lines denote mean durations of CVCV sequences and ± 1 standard deviations obtained from the group data. The blue, red and gray markers show the individual analysis for the Japanese children denoting means duration of CVCV sequences.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818465&req=5

pone-0078600-g003: The developmental changes of durations of CVCV sequences in Japanese children’s speech.The solid and dash lines denote mean durations of CVCV sequences and ± 1 standard deviations obtained from the group data. The blue, red and gray markers show the individual analysis for the Japanese children denoting means duration of CVCV sequences.
Mentions: For the developmental changes in the preference for the direction of articulations (Figure 2ii), although values of the fronting index fluctuated over time, both children showed early preference to the fronting patterns. This preference exists around 12 months and seems to decrease after 18 months (R2 = 0.670 and 0.158 for child B and C, respectively). For the development of intra-organ articulations (Figure 2iii), we obtained a developmental curve (R2 = 0.833 and 0.278 for child B and C, respectively). For the development of inter-organ articulations (Figure 2iv), we obtained two developmental curves (Figure 2iv), that is, CLVCC + CCVCL (R2 = 0.708 and 0.268 for child B and C, respectively) and CLVCD + CDVCL (R2 = 0.468 and 0.664 for child B and C, respectively). For child B, normalized ratios of intra-articulatory development were initially higher than those of inter-articulatory development (labial and coronal, and labial and dorsal consonants patterns). Yet, once the ratios of each of labial-coronal and labial-dorsal consonants patterns exceeded those of intra-organ articulations at 19.1 and 14.2 months of age, respectively, they rapidly peaked at 27.6 and 25.1 months of age, respectively. Although actual normalized ratios of child B and C differ from each others, based on patterns of the intersectional and peak months for the intra- and inter-organ articulations, the child C showed a similar pattern of changes, that is, each of the inter-organ articulations exceeded intra-organ ones at 15.1 and 21.0 months of age, respectively, and rapidly peaked at 21.1 and 25.3 months of age, respectively. In addition, we also analyzed the developmental changes in speed of CVCV articulation. Both children showed peaks in the mean duration of CVCV around 18 months after which the value gradually decreased (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops.In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends.These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Education, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan ; Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Koujimachi Business Center, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Universal linguistic constraints seem to govern the organization of sound sequences in words. However, our understanding of the origin and development of these constraints is incomplete. One possibility is that the development of neuromuscular control of articulators acts as a constraint for the emergence of sequences in words. Repetitions of the same consonant observed in early infancy and an increase in variation of consonantal sequences over months of age have been interpreted as a consequence of the development of neuromuscular control. Yet, it is not clear how sequential coordination of articulators such as lips, tongue apex and tongue dorsum constrains sequences of labial, coronal and dorsal consonants in words over the course of development. We examined longitudinal development of consonant-vowel-consonant(-vowel) sequences produced by Japanese children between 7 and 60 months of age. The sequences were classified according to places of articulation for corresponding consonants. The analyses of individual and group data show that infants prefer repetitive and fronting articulations, as shown in previous studies. Furthermore, we reveal that serial order of different places of articulations within the same organ appears earlier and then gradually develops, whereas serial order of different articulatory organs appears later and then rapidly develops. In the same way, we also analyzed the sequences produced by English children and obtained similar developmental trends. These results suggest that the development of intra- and inter-articulator coordination constrains the acquisition of serial orders in speech with the complexity that characterizes adult language.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus