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Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal.

Bodewes R, Rubio García A, Wiersma LC, Getu S, Beukers M, Schapendonk CM, van Run PR, van de Bildt MW, Poen MJ, Osinga N, Sánchez Contreras GJ, Kuiken T, Smits SL, Osterhaus AD - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal.Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges.These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Replication of Seal parvovirus invitro.Bone marrow cells of seal were incubated with (open symbols) or without (closed symbols) canine erythropoietin and inoculated with either PBS (diamond) or 2µl (circles) or 20µl (squares) of brain tissue homogenate from the parvovirus positive seal. At various time points after inoculations, samples were collected for counting of live cells by FACSanalysis (A) or real time-PCR using primers and probe specific for the Seal parvovirus (B). The detection limit of the assay was indicated with ND (not detectable).
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pone-0079259-g005: Replication of Seal parvovirus invitro.Bone marrow cells of seal were incubated with (open symbols) or without (closed symbols) canine erythropoietin and inoculated with either PBS (diamond) or 2µl (circles) or 20µl (squares) of brain tissue homogenate from the parvovirus positive seal. At various time points after inoculations, samples were collected for counting of live cells by FACSanalysis (A) or real time-PCR using primers and probe specific for the Seal parvovirus (B). The detection limit of the assay was indicated with ND (not detectable).

Mentions: The presence of infectious Seal parvovirus in the brain of seal 12-410 was confirmed by in vitro culture using seal bone marrow cells. The number of cultured cells increased and erythropoiesis was induced in the presence of cEPO, which was not the case in the absence of cEPO (Figure 5A, data not shown). Following inoculation of bone marrow cells with lung tissue homogenate, cells died rapidly, most likely due to the presence of toxic components (data not shown). No increased cell death was observed when brain tissue homogenate was added (Figure 5A). Ct-values of cells inoculated with 40μl/ml brain tissue and cEPO decreased from 33 at t=0 to 26 at t=7 and t=10, suggesting active virus replication (Figure 5B). No Seal parvovirus DNA was detected in cells incubated with transport medium only, with the same homogenate without cEPO, or in cells incubated with 4μl/ml control brain tissue homogenate with cEPO.


Novel B19-like parvovirus in the brain of a harbor seal.

Bodewes R, Rubio García A, Wiersma LC, Getu S, Beukers M, Schapendonk CM, van Run PR, van de Bildt MW, Poen MJ, Osinga N, Sánchez Contreras GJ, Kuiken T, Smits SL, Osterhaus AD - PLoS ONE (2013)

Replication of Seal parvovirus invitro.Bone marrow cells of seal were incubated with (open symbols) or without (closed symbols) canine erythropoietin and inoculated with either PBS (diamond) or 2µl (circles) or 20µl (squares) of brain tissue homogenate from the parvovirus positive seal. At various time points after inoculations, samples were collected for counting of live cells by FACSanalysis (A) or real time-PCR using primers and probe specific for the Seal parvovirus (B). The detection limit of the assay was indicated with ND (not detectable).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818428&req=5

pone-0079259-g005: Replication of Seal parvovirus invitro.Bone marrow cells of seal were incubated with (open symbols) or without (closed symbols) canine erythropoietin and inoculated with either PBS (diamond) or 2µl (circles) or 20µl (squares) of brain tissue homogenate from the parvovirus positive seal. At various time points after inoculations, samples were collected for counting of live cells by FACSanalysis (A) or real time-PCR using primers and probe specific for the Seal parvovirus (B). The detection limit of the assay was indicated with ND (not detectable).
Mentions: The presence of infectious Seal parvovirus in the brain of seal 12-410 was confirmed by in vitro culture using seal bone marrow cells. The number of cultured cells increased and erythropoiesis was induced in the presence of cEPO, which was not the case in the absence of cEPO (Figure 5A, data not shown). Following inoculation of bone marrow cells with lung tissue homogenate, cells died rapidly, most likely due to the presence of toxic components (data not shown). No increased cell death was observed when brain tissue homogenate was added (Figure 5A). Ct-values of cells inoculated with 40μl/ml brain tissue and cEPO decreased from 33 at t=0 to 26 at t=7 and t=10, suggesting active virus replication (Figure 5B). No Seal parvovirus DNA was detected in cells incubated with transport medium only, with the same homogenate without cEPO, or in cells incubated with 4μl/ml control brain tissue homogenate with cEPO.

Bottom Line: In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal.Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges.These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Viroscience, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Using random PCR in combination with next-generation sequencing, a novel parvovirus was detected in the brain of a young harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) with chronic non-suppurative meningo-encephalitis that was rehabilitated at the Seal Rehabilitation and Research Centre (SRRC) in the Netherlands. In addition, two novel viruses belonging to the family Anelloviridae were detected in the lungs of this animal. Phylogenetic analysis of the coding sequence of the novel parvovirus, tentatively called Seal parvovirus, indicated that this virus belonged to the genus Erythrovirus, to which human parvovirus B19 also belongs. Although no other seals with similar signs were rehabilitated in SRRC in recent years, a prevalence study of tissues of seals from the same area collected in the period 2008-2012 indicated that the Seal parvovirus has circulated in the harbor seal population at least since 2008. The presence of the Seal parvovirus in the brain was confirmed by real-time PCR and in vitro replication. Using in situ hybridization, we showed for the first time that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus was present in the Virchow-Robin space and in cerebral parenchyma adjacent to the meninges. These findings showed that a parvovirus of the genus Erythrovirus can be involved in central nervous system infection and inflammation, as has also been suspected but not proven for human parvovirus B19 infection.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus