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Prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in patients treated for childhood craniopharyngioma: a systematic literature review.

Zada G, Kintz N, Pulido M, Amezcua L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Common descriptors of behavior in affected children included irritability, impulsivity, aggressiveness, and emotional outbursts.Thorough neurobehavioral/emotional screening and appropriate counseling is recommended in this population.Additional research is warranted to identify risk factors and treatment strategies for these disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are locally invasive and frequently recurring neoplasms often resulting in neurological and endocrinological dysfunction in children. In addition, social-behavioral impairment is commonly reported following treatment for childhood CP, yet remains to be fully understood. The authors aimed to further characterize the prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in survivors of childhood craniopharyngiomas.

Materials and methods: A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed to identify studies formally assessing neurobehavioral, social, and emotional outcomes in patients treated for CP prior to 18 years of age. Studies published between the years 1990-2012 that reported the primary outcome (prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, emotional/affective dysfunction, and/or impaired quality of life (QoL)) in ≥ 10 patients were included.

Results: Of the 471 studies screened, 11 met inclusion criteria. Overall neurobehavioral dysfunction was reported in 51 of 90 patients (57%) with available data. Social impairment (i.e. withdrawal, internalizing behavior) was reported in 91 of 222 cases (41%). School dysfunction was reported in 48 of 136 patients (35%). Emotional/affective dysfunction was reported in 58 of 146 patients (40%), primarily consisting of depressive symptoms. Health related quality of life was affected in 49 of 95 patients (52%). Common descriptors of behavior in affected children included irritability, impulsivity, aggressiveness, and emotional outbursts.

Conclusions: Neurobehavioral, social, and emotional impairment is highly prevalent in survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma, and often affects quality of life. Thorough neurobehavioral/emotional screening and appropriate counseling is recommended in this population. Additional research is warranted to identify risk factors and treatment strategies for these disorders.

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Flow diagram detailing the flow of information and study selection through the systematic review process.
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pone-0076562-g001: Flow diagram detailing the flow of information and study selection through the systematic review process.

Mentions: The primary objective of the current search strategy was to identify all published studies reporting the incidence of neurobehavioral, social, or affective/emotional outcomes in patients diagnosed and treated for childhood craniopharyngioma (≤18 years of age). A detailed systematic search strategy was developed which included all four authors and was conducted using the PubMed database. All search results were limited to studies published between 1990-2012 in order to preferentially select for patients treated with current multimodality regimens and screened using current neuropsychological assessments. Search criteria were based on keywords related to CP in children and neurobehavioral, social, and emotional outcomes (Figure 1) using the following search terms: “Craniopharyngioma and pediatric,” “craniopharyngioma and behavioral,” “craniopharyngioma and neurobehavioral,” “craniopharyngioma and psychiatric,” “craniopharyngioma and children and behavior,” “craniopharyngioma and social,” "craniopharyngioma and emotional," and “craniopharyngioma and depression/anxiety.” In addition, the reference lists of all relevant articles were examined for reports of additionally relevant studies. The study was conducted in accordance with the 2009 preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for methodology of systematic reviews[10].


Prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in patients treated for childhood craniopharyngioma: a systematic literature review.

Zada G, Kintz N, Pulido M, Amezcua L - PLoS ONE (2013)

Flow diagram detailing the flow of information and study selection through the systematic review process.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818366&req=5

pone-0076562-g001: Flow diagram detailing the flow of information and study selection through the systematic review process.
Mentions: The primary objective of the current search strategy was to identify all published studies reporting the incidence of neurobehavioral, social, or affective/emotional outcomes in patients diagnosed and treated for childhood craniopharyngioma (≤18 years of age). A detailed systematic search strategy was developed which included all four authors and was conducted using the PubMed database. All search results were limited to studies published between 1990-2012 in order to preferentially select for patients treated with current multimodality regimens and screened using current neuropsychological assessments. Search criteria were based on keywords related to CP in children and neurobehavioral, social, and emotional outcomes (Figure 1) using the following search terms: “Craniopharyngioma and pediatric,” “craniopharyngioma and behavioral,” “craniopharyngioma and neurobehavioral,” “craniopharyngioma and psychiatric,” “craniopharyngioma and children and behavior,” “craniopharyngioma and social,” "craniopharyngioma and emotional," and “craniopharyngioma and depression/anxiety.” In addition, the reference lists of all relevant articles were examined for reports of additionally relevant studies. The study was conducted in accordance with the 2009 preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines for methodology of systematic reviews[10].

Bottom Line: Common descriptors of behavior in affected children included irritability, impulsivity, aggressiveness, and emotional outbursts.Thorough neurobehavioral/emotional screening and appropriate counseling is recommended in this population.Additional research is warranted to identify risk factors and treatment strategies for these disorders.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Keck School of Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT

Background: Craniopharyngiomas (CP) are locally invasive and frequently recurring neoplasms often resulting in neurological and endocrinological dysfunction in children. In addition, social-behavioral impairment is commonly reported following treatment for childhood CP, yet remains to be fully understood. The authors aimed to further characterize the prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, and emotional dysfunction in survivors of childhood craniopharyngiomas.

Materials and methods: A systematic literature review was conducted in PubMed to identify studies formally assessing neurobehavioral, social, and emotional outcomes in patients treated for CP prior to 18 years of age. Studies published between the years 1990-2012 that reported the primary outcome (prevalence of neurobehavioral, social, emotional/affective dysfunction, and/or impaired quality of life (QoL)) in ≥ 10 patients were included.

Results: Of the 471 studies screened, 11 met inclusion criteria. Overall neurobehavioral dysfunction was reported in 51 of 90 patients (57%) with available data. Social impairment (i.e. withdrawal, internalizing behavior) was reported in 91 of 222 cases (41%). School dysfunction was reported in 48 of 136 patients (35%). Emotional/affective dysfunction was reported in 58 of 146 patients (40%), primarily consisting of depressive symptoms. Health related quality of life was affected in 49 of 95 patients (52%). Common descriptors of behavior in affected children included irritability, impulsivity, aggressiveness, and emotional outbursts.

Conclusions: Neurobehavioral, social, and emotional impairment is highly prevalent in survivors of childhood craniopharyngioma, and often affects quality of life. Thorough neurobehavioral/emotional screening and appropriate counseling is recommended in this population. Additional research is warranted to identify risk factors and treatment strategies for these disorders.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus