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A mechanistic individual-based model of the feeding processes for Oikopleura dioica.

Vaugeois M, Diaz F, Carlotti F - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: The half-saturation coefficient for ingestion resulting from model simulations is approximately 28 [Formula: see text] and is independent of the weight of the organism.Simulations using fluctuating environmental food availability show that food depletion is not immediately experienced by the organism but that it occurs after a lag time because of house and gut buffering abilities.This lag time duration lasts at least 30 minutes and can reach more than 2 hours, depending on when the food depletion occurs during the house lifespan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aix Marseille Université, French National Centre for Scientific Research/INSU, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), UM 110, Marseille, France ; Université de Toulon, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, UM 110, La Garde, France.

ABSTRACT
A mechanistic physiological model of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica has been built to represent its three feeding processes (filtration, ingestion and assimilation). The mathematical formulation of these processes is based on laboratory observations from the literature, and tests different hypotheses. This model accounts for house formation dynamics, the food storage capacity of the house and the gut throughput dynamics. The half-saturation coefficient for ingestion resulting from model simulations is approximately 28 [Formula: see text] and is independent of the weight of the organism. The maximum food intake for ingestion is also a property of the model and depends on the weight of the organism. Both are in accordance with data from the literature. The model also provides a realistic representation of carbon accumulation within the house. The modelled half-saturation coefficient for assimilation is approximately 15 [Formula: see text] and is also independent of the weight of the organism. Modelled gut throughput dynamics are based on faecal pellet formation by gut compaction. Model outputs showed that below a food concentration of 30 [Formula: see text], the faecal pellet weight should represent a lower proportion of the body weight of the organism, meaning that the faecal pellet formation is not driven by gut filling. Simulations using fluctuating environmental food availability show that food depletion is not immediately experienced by the organism but that it occurs after a lag time because of house and gut buffering abilities. This lag time duration lasts at least 30 minutes and can reach more than 2 hours, depending on when the food depletion occurs during the house lifespan.

Show MeSH
Fluxes and state variables dynamics during simulation with an alimentary interruption occurring at half of the house lifespan (1.44 h).Rates of filtration (F), ingestion (I) and assimilation (A) in  (a); carbon mass of the house contents (HOU) and carbon mass of the gut contents (GUT)(b) in . Run performed at a temperature of 15°C and an initial food concentration of 100  over four house cycles for an individual organism of 1 .
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pone-0078255-g006: Fluxes and state variables dynamics during simulation with an alimentary interruption occurring at half of the house lifespan (1.44 h).Rates of filtration (F), ingestion (I) and assimilation (A) in (a); carbon mass of the house contents (HOU) and carbon mass of the gut contents (GUT)(b) in . Run performed at a temperature of 15°C and an initial food concentration of 100 over four house cycles for an individual organism of 1 .

Mentions: To simulate starvation, we ran simulations over one house cycle using initial fixed conditions (T = 15°C and food equal to 100 ) during which an alimentary interruption occurred at half the house lifespan (figure 6), or at different times during the house lifespan (figure 7).


A mechanistic individual-based model of the feeding processes for Oikopleura dioica.

Vaugeois M, Diaz F, Carlotti F - PLoS ONE (2013)

Fluxes and state variables dynamics during simulation with an alimentary interruption occurring at half of the house lifespan (1.44 h).Rates of filtration (F), ingestion (I) and assimilation (A) in  (a); carbon mass of the house contents (HOU) and carbon mass of the gut contents (GUT)(b) in . Run performed at a temperature of 15°C and an initial food concentration of 100  over four house cycles for an individual organism of 1 .
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818322&req=5

pone-0078255-g006: Fluxes and state variables dynamics during simulation with an alimentary interruption occurring at half of the house lifespan (1.44 h).Rates of filtration (F), ingestion (I) and assimilation (A) in (a); carbon mass of the house contents (HOU) and carbon mass of the gut contents (GUT)(b) in . Run performed at a temperature of 15°C and an initial food concentration of 100 over four house cycles for an individual organism of 1 .
Mentions: To simulate starvation, we ran simulations over one house cycle using initial fixed conditions (T = 15°C and food equal to 100 ) during which an alimentary interruption occurred at half the house lifespan (figure 6), or at different times during the house lifespan (figure 7).

Bottom Line: The half-saturation coefficient for ingestion resulting from model simulations is approximately 28 [Formula: see text] and is independent of the weight of the organism.Simulations using fluctuating environmental food availability show that food depletion is not immediately experienced by the organism but that it occurs after a lag time because of house and gut buffering abilities.This lag time duration lasts at least 30 minutes and can reach more than 2 hours, depending on when the food depletion occurs during the house lifespan.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Aix Marseille Université, French National Centre for Scientific Research/INSU, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography (MIO), UM 110, Marseille, France ; Université de Toulon, CNRS/INSU, IRD, Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography, UM 110, La Garde, France.

ABSTRACT
A mechanistic physiological model of the appendicularian Oikopleura dioica has been built to represent its three feeding processes (filtration, ingestion and assimilation). The mathematical formulation of these processes is based on laboratory observations from the literature, and tests different hypotheses. This model accounts for house formation dynamics, the food storage capacity of the house and the gut throughput dynamics. The half-saturation coefficient for ingestion resulting from model simulations is approximately 28 [Formula: see text] and is independent of the weight of the organism. The maximum food intake for ingestion is also a property of the model and depends on the weight of the organism. Both are in accordance with data from the literature. The model also provides a realistic representation of carbon accumulation within the house. The modelled half-saturation coefficient for assimilation is approximately 15 [Formula: see text] and is also independent of the weight of the organism. Modelled gut throughput dynamics are based on faecal pellet formation by gut compaction. Model outputs showed that below a food concentration of 30 [Formula: see text], the faecal pellet weight should represent a lower proportion of the body weight of the organism, meaning that the faecal pellet formation is not driven by gut filling. Simulations using fluctuating environmental food availability show that food depletion is not immediately experienced by the organism but that it occurs after a lag time because of house and gut buffering abilities. This lag time duration lasts at least 30 minutes and can reach more than 2 hours, depending on when the food depletion occurs during the house lifespan.

Show MeSH