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The neural basis of responsibility attribution in decision-making.

Li P, Shen Y, Sui X, Chen C, Feng T, Li H, Holroyd C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: In two previous event-related brain potential (ERP) studies we found that personal responsibility modulated outcome evaluation in gambling tasks.Specifically, right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ) was associated with social pride whereas dorsal striatum and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were related to reinforcement of behaviors leading to personal gain.The present study provides evidence that the RTPJ is an important region for determining whether self-generated behaviors are deserving of praise in a social context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center of Psychological Development and Education, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, China ; School of Psychology, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, China.

ABSTRACT
Social responsibility links personal behavior with societal expectations and plays a key role in affecting an agent's emotional state following a decision. However, the neural basis of responsibility attribution remains unclear. In two previous event-related brain potential (ERP) studies we found that personal responsibility modulated outcome evaluation in gambling tasks. Here we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to identify particular brain regions that mediate responsibility attribution. In a context involving team cooperation, participants completed a task with their teammates and on each trial received feedback about team success and individual success sequentially. We found that brain activity differed between conditions involving team success vs. team failure. Further, different brain regions were associated with reinforcement of behavior by social praise vs. monetary reward. Specifically, right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ) was associated with social pride whereas dorsal striatum and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were related to reinforcement of behaviors leading to personal gain. The present study provides evidence that the RTPJ is an important region for determining whether self-generated behaviors are deserving of praise in a social context.

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Brain regions associated with the effect of guilt.Error bars indicate standard error. Abbreviation: DS , dorsal striatum ;PG ,parahippocampal gyrus.
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pone-0080389-g005: Brain regions associated with the effect of guilt.Error bars indicate standard error. Abbreviation: DS , dorsal striatum ;PG ,parahippocampal gyrus.

Mentions: A three-level ANOVA (HG, MG, LG) on the BOLD response associated with the guilt condition revealed only a few clusters sensitive to guilt attribution in a whole brain random analysis, including caudate, bilateral cerebellum and occipital cortex as listed in Table 3 (Figure 5). Associated beta values were correlated with behavioral data across the three guilt conditions (HG, MG, LG).


The neural basis of responsibility attribution in decision-making.

Li P, Shen Y, Sui X, Chen C, Feng T, Li H, Holroyd C - PLoS ONE (2013)

Brain regions associated with the effect of guilt.Error bars indicate standard error. Abbreviation: DS , dorsal striatum ;PG ,parahippocampal gyrus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818257&req=5

pone-0080389-g005: Brain regions associated with the effect of guilt.Error bars indicate standard error. Abbreviation: DS , dorsal striatum ;PG ,parahippocampal gyrus.
Mentions: A three-level ANOVA (HG, MG, LG) on the BOLD response associated with the guilt condition revealed only a few clusters sensitive to guilt attribution in a whole brain random analysis, including caudate, bilateral cerebellum and occipital cortex as listed in Table 3 (Figure 5). Associated beta values were correlated with behavioral data across the three guilt conditions (HG, MG, LG).

Bottom Line: In two previous event-related brain potential (ERP) studies we found that personal responsibility modulated outcome evaluation in gambling tasks.Specifically, right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ) was associated with social pride whereas dorsal striatum and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were related to reinforcement of behaviors leading to personal gain.The present study provides evidence that the RTPJ is an important region for determining whether self-generated behaviors are deserving of praise in a social context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center of Psychological Development and Education, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, China ; School of Psychology, Liaoning Normal University, Dalian, China.

ABSTRACT
Social responsibility links personal behavior with societal expectations and plays a key role in affecting an agent's emotional state following a decision. However, the neural basis of responsibility attribution remains unclear. In two previous event-related brain potential (ERP) studies we found that personal responsibility modulated outcome evaluation in gambling tasks. Here we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to identify particular brain regions that mediate responsibility attribution. In a context involving team cooperation, participants completed a task with their teammates and on each trial received feedback about team success and individual success sequentially. We found that brain activity differed between conditions involving team success vs. team failure. Further, different brain regions were associated with reinforcement of behavior by social praise vs. monetary reward. Specifically, right temporoparietal junction (RTPJ) was associated with social pride whereas dorsal striatum and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were related to reinforcement of behaviors leading to personal gain. The present study provides evidence that the RTPJ is an important region for determining whether self-generated behaviors are deserving of praise in a social context.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus