Limits...
Grey matter correlates of three language tests in non-demented older adults.

Zhang H, Sachdev PS, Wen W, Kochan NA, Crawford JD, Brodaty H, Slavin MJ, Reppermund S, Kang K, Trollor JN - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we divided the participants into two age groups (70-79 and 80-90 years old), and then examined the correlations between structural laterality indices and language performance for each group.A trend toward significant difference in the correlations was found between the two age groups, with stronger correlations in the group of 70-79 years old than those in the group of 80-90 years old.This difference might suggest a further decline of language lateralization in different stages of late life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Ageing Research Program, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Language has been extensively investigated by functional neuroimaging studies. However, only a limited number of structural neuroimaging studies have examined the relationship between language performance and brain structure in healthy adults, and the number is even less in older adults. The present study sought to investigate correlations between grey matter volumes and three standardized language tests in late life. The participants were 344 non-demented, community-dwelling adults aged 70-90 years, who were drawn from the population-based Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. The three language tests included the Controlled Oral Word Association Task (COWAT), Category Fluency (CF), and Boston Naming Test (BNT). Correlation analyses between voxel-wise GM volumes and language tests showed distinctive GM correlation patterns for each language test. The GM correlates were located in the right frontal and left temporal lobes for COWAT, in the left frontal and temporal lobes for CF, and in bilateral temporal lobes for BNT. Our findings largely corresponded to the neural substrates of language tasks revealed in fMRI studies, and we also observed a less hemispheric asymmetry in the GM correlates of the language tests. Furthermore, we divided the participants into two age groups (70-79 and 80-90 years old), and then examined the correlations between structural laterality indices and language performance for each group. A trend toward significant difference in the correlations was found between the two age groups, with stronger correlations in the group of 70-79 years old than those in the group of 80-90 years old. This difference might suggest a further decline of language lateralization in different stages of late life.

Show MeSH
Grey matter correlates of BNT.Brain regions where voxel-based GM volumes are positively correlated with BNT in 344 participants aged 70-90 years, superimposed on the sagittal slices of the brain template. The slices are at 4 mm intervals between and including -48 mm and 44 mm. The colour bar represents the t score ranging from 0 to 5.5; and yellow indicates a higher t score than red.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818244&req=5

pone-0080215-g003: Grey matter correlates of BNT.Brain regions where voxel-based GM volumes are positively correlated with BNT in 344 participants aged 70-90 years, superimposed on the sagittal slices of the brain template. The slices are at 4 mm intervals between and including -48 mm and 44 mm. The colour bar represents the t score ranging from 0 to 5.5; and yellow indicates a higher t score than red.

Mentions: The cluster of voxels where GM volumes were positively correlated with COWAT were located in the left posterior middle temporal gyrus, right precentral and inferior frontal gyri, right hippocampus, right substantia nigra, and bilateral cerebellum (Figure 1). The positive GM correlates of CF were only located in the left hemisphere, including the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, temporal pole, orbitofrontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and cerebellum (Figure 2). The positive GM correlates of BNT were located in largely symmetrical positions of bilateral hemispheres, including the bilateral hippocampi, parahippocampal gyri and temporal poles, as well as the right fusiform gyrus (Figure 3).


Grey matter correlates of three language tests in non-demented older adults.

Zhang H, Sachdev PS, Wen W, Kochan NA, Crawford JD, Brodaty H, Slavin MJ, Reppermund S, Kang K, Trollor JN - PLoS ONE (2013)

Grey matter correlates of BNT.Brain regions where voxel-based GM volumes are positively correlated with BNT in 344 participants aged 70-90 years, superimposed on the sagittal slices of the brain template. The slices are at 4 mm intervals between and including -48 mm and 44 mm. The colour bar represents the t score ranging from 0 to 5.5; and yellow indicates a higher t score than red.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818244&req=5

pone-0080215-g003: Grey matter correlates of BNT.Brain regions where voxel-based GM volumes are positively correlated with BNT in 344 participants aged 70-90 years, superimposed on the sagittal slices of the brain template. The slices are at 4 mm intervals between and including -48 mm and 44 mm. The colour bar represents the t score ranging from 0 to 5.5; and yellow indicates a higher t score than red.
Mentions: The cluster of voxels where GM volumes were positively correlated with COWAT were located in the left posterior middle temporal gyrus, right precentral and inferior frontal gyri, right hippocampus, right substantia nigra, and bilateral cerebellum (Figure 1). The positive GM correlates of CF were only located in the left hemisphere, including the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, temporal pole, orbitofrontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, insula, and cerebellum (Figure 2). The positive GM correlates of BNT were located in largely symmetrical positions of bilateral hemispheres, including the bilateral hippocampi, parahippocampal gyri and temporal poles, as well as the right fusiform gyrus (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Furthermore, we divided the participants into two age groups (70-79 and 80-90 years old), and then examined the correlations between structural laterality indices and language performance for each group.A trend toward significant difference in the correlations was found between the two age groups, with stronger correlations in the group of 70-79 years old than those in the group of 80-90 years old.This difference might suggest a further decline of language lateralization in different stages of late life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Brain and Ageing Research Program, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Language has been extensively investigated by functional neuroimaging studies. However, only a limited number of structural neuroimaging studies have examined the relationship between language performance and brain structure in healthy adults, and the number is even less in older adults. The present study sought to investigate correlations between grey matter volumes and three standardized language tests in late life. The participants were 344 non-demented, community-dwelling adults aged 70-90 years, who were drawn from the population-based Sydney Memory and Ageing Study. The three language tests included the Controlled Oral Word Association Task (COWAT), Category Fluency (CF), and Boston Naming Test (BNT). Correlation analyses between voxel-wise GM volumes and language tests showed distinctive GM correlation patterns for each language test. The GM correlates were located in the right frontal and left temporal lobes for COWAT, in the left frontal and temporal lobes for CF, and in bilateral temporal lobes for BNT. Our findings largely corresponded to the neural substrates of language tasks revealed in fMRI studies, and we also observed a less hemispheric asymmetry in the GM correlates of the language tests. Furthermore, we divided the participants into two age groups (70-79 and 80-90 years old), and then examined the correlations between structural laterality indices and language performance for each group. A trend toward significant difference in the correlations was found between the two age groups, with stronger correlations in the group of 70-79 years old than those in the group of 80-90 years old. This difference might suggest a further decline of language lateralization in different stages of late life.

Show MeSH