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Population structure and genetic diversity of native and invasive populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae).

Zhao J, Solís-Montero L, Lou A, Vallejo-Marín M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Bottom Line: We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum.Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (F IS) or population differentiation (F ST).The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Aims: We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1) determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2) explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3) investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into China.

Methods: We genotyped 329 individuals at 10 microsatellite loci to determine the levels of genetic diversity and to investigate population structure of native and introduced populations of S. rostratum. We studied five populations in each of three regions across two continents: Mexico, the U.S.A. and China.

Important findings: We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (F IS) or population differentiation (F ST). Population structure analyses indicate that Chinese and U.S.A. populations are more closely related to each other than to sampled Mexican populations, revealing that introduced populations in China share an origin with the sampled U.S.A. populations. The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China.

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Map showing the location of the 15 sampled populations of Solanum rostratum used in this study.Left panel: Mexican (native, green circles) and U.S.A. populations from the U.S.A. (residence time >130 years, blue circles). Right panel: Chinese populations (residence time <31 years, red circles). Details of localities and population codes are provided in Table 1.
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pone-0079807-g001: Map showing the location of the 15 sampled populations of Solanum rostratum used in this study.Left panel: Mexican (native, green circles) and U.S.A. populations from the U.S.A. (residence time >130 years, blue circles). Right panel: Chinese populations (residence time <31 years, red circles). Details of localities and population codes are provided in Table 1.

Mentions: We randomly collected fresh leaves of from individuals of Solanum rostratum. The sampling sites were located in road sides, banks of rivers, waste land. These sites didn't belong to a national park or other protected area of land and the relevant regulatory body concerned with protection of wildlife, and they also didn't belong to private land. We confirm that the field studies did not involve endangered or protected species. A total of 15 populations were sampled from July 2010 to June 2011. Five populations were sampled from each of the following three regions: central Mexico, the Kansas-Oklahoma region in the U.S.A. where records date back at least to the 1880's (Kansas State University Herbarium) and northern China (Table 1, Figure 1). These three regions were chosen to represent a range of residence histories for S. rostratum from the native range in Mexico, to the Kansas-Oklahoma region where S. rostratum has been reported for at least 130 years, to the recent introduction of this species to China in the last 30 years.


Population structure and genetic diversity of native and invasive populations of Solanum rostratum (Solanaceae).

Zhao J, Solís-Montero L, Lou A, Vallejo-Marín M - PLoS ONE (2013)

Map showing the location of the 15 sampled populations of Solanum rostratum used in this study.Left panel: Mexican (native, green circles) and U.S.A. populations from the U.S.A. (residence time >130 years, blue circles). Right panel: Chinese populations (residence time <31 years, red circles). Details of localities and population codes are provided in Table 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818217&req=5

pone-0079807-g001: Map showing the location of the 15 sampled populations of Solanum rostratum used in this study.Left panel: Mexican (native, green circles) and U.S.A. populations from the U.S.A. (residence time >130 years, blue circles). Right panel: Chinese populations (residence time <31 years, red circles). Details of localities and population codes are provided in Table 1.
Mentions: We randomly collected fresh leaves of from individuals of Solanum rostratum. The sampling sites were located in road sides, banks of rivers, waste land. These sites didn't belong to a national park or other protected area of land and the relevant regulatory body concerned with protection of wildlife, and they also didn't belong to private land. We confirm that the field studies did not involve endangered or protected species. A total of 15 populations were sampled from July 2010 to June 2011. Five populations were sampled from each of the following three regions: central Mexico, the Kansas-Oklahoma region in the U.S.A. where records date back at least to the 1880's (Kansas State University Herbarium) and northern China (Table 1, Figure 1). These three regions were chosen to represent a range of residence histories for S. rostratum from the native range in Mexico, to the Kansas-Oklahoma region where S. rostratum has been reported for at least 130 years, to the recent introduction of this species to China in the last 30 years.

Bottom Line: We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum.Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (F IS) or population differentiation (F ST).The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, College of Life Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT

Aims: We investigate native and introduced populations of Solanum rostratum, an annual, self-compatible plant that has been introduced around the globe. This study is the first to compare the genetic diversity of Solanum rostratum between native and introduced populations. We aim to (1) determine the level of genetic diversity across the studied regions; (2) explore the likely origins of invasive populations in China; and (3) investigate whether there is the evidence of multiple introductions into China.

Methods: We genotyped 329 individuals at 10 microsatellite loci to determine the levels of genetic diversity and to investigate population structure of native and introduced populations of S. rostratum. We studied five populations in each of three regions across two continents: Mexico, the U.S.A. and China.

Important findings: We found the highest genetic diversity among Mexican populations of S. rostratum. Genetic diversity was significantly lower in Chinese and U.S.A. populations, but we found no regional difference in inbreeding coefficients (F IS) or population differentiation (F ST). Population structure analyses indicate that Chinese and U.S.A. populations are more closely related to each other than to sampled Mexican populations, revealing that introduced populations in China share an origin with the sampled U.S.A. populations. The distinctiveness between some introduced populations indicates multiple introductions of S. rostratum into China.

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