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Physical capability and subsequent positive mental wellbeing in older people: findings from five HALCyon cohorts.

Cooper R, Stafford M, Hardy R, Aihie Sayer A, Ben-Shlomo Y, Cooper C, Craig L, Deary IJ, Gallacher J, McNeill G, Starr JM, Kuh D, Gale CR, HALCyon study te - Age (Dordr) (2013)

Bottom Line: Data from each study were analysed separately and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses.When adjusted for body size, health status, living alone, socioeconomic position and neuroticism the associations remained albeit attenuated.The finding of these consistent modest associations across five studies, spanning early and later old age, highlights the importance of maintaining physical capability in later life and provides additional justification for using objective measures of physical capability as markers of healthy ageing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, University College London, 33 Bedford Place, London, WC1B 5JU, UK, r.cooper@nshd.mrc.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Objective measures of physical capability are being used in a growing number of studies as biomarkers of healthy ageing. However, very little research has been done to assess the impact of physical capability on subsequent positive mental wellbeing, the maintenance of which is widely considered to be an essential component of healthy ageing. We aimed to test the associations of grip strength and walking, timed get up and go and chair rise speeds (assessed at ages 53 to 82 years) with positive mental wellbeing assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) 5 to 10 years later. Data were drawn from five British cohorts participating in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course research collaboration. Data from each study were analysed separately and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Higher levels of physical capability were consistently associated with higher subsequent levels of wellbeing; for example, a 1SD increase in grip strength was associated with an age and sex-adjusted mean difference in WEMWBS score of 0.81 (0.25, 1.37), equivalent to 10 % of a standard deviation (three studies, N = 3,096). When adjusted for body size, health status, living alone, socioeconomic position and neuroticism the associations remained albeit attenuated. The finding of these consistent modest associations across five studies, spanning early and later old age, highlights the importance of maintaining physical capability in later life and provides additional justification for using objective measures of physical capability as markers of healthy ageing.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Change in mean WEMWBS score per 1SD increase in specified capability measure
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Fig1: Change in mean WEMWBS score per 1SD increase in specified capability measure

Mentions: There was consistent evidence across cohorts that better performance on each of the four physical capability measures was associated with higher subsequent levels of wellbeing; estimates from meta-analyses of age and sex-adjusted unstandardized regression coefficients ranged from a mean difference in WEMWBS score of 0.79 (0.28, 1.30) to 1.70 (0.49, 2.91) for every 1SD increase in physical capability (see Table 3 and Fig. 1), which is equivalent to a difference of 10 to 21 % of a standard deviation in WEMWBS score (based on WEMWBS score SD = 8). Adjustment for covariates had a similar impact on effect estimates across cohorts; few of the adjustments for individual covariates attenuated the associations greatly with the exception of adjustment for neuroticism (results not shown). In fully adjusted models, associations between physical capability and WEMWBS remained, albeit attenuated (Table 3).Table 3


Physical capability and subsequent positive mental wellbeing in older people: findings from five HALCyon cohorts.

Cooper R, Stafford M, Hardy R, Aihie Sayer A, Ben-Shlomo Y, Cooper C, Craig L, Deary IJ, Gallacher J, McNeill G, Starr JM, Kuh D, Gale CR, HALCyon study te - Age (Dordr) (2013)

Change in mean WEMWBS score per 1SD increase in specified capability measure
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818137&req=5

Fig1: Change in mean WEMWBS score per 1SD increase in specified capability measure
Mentions: There was consistent evidence across cohorts that better performance on each of the four physical capability measures was associated with higher subsequent levels of wellbeing; estimates from meta-analyses of age and sex-adjusted unstandardized regression coefficients ranged from a mean difference in WEMWBS score of 0.79 (0.28, 1.30) to 1.70 (0.49, 2.91) for every 1SD increase in physical capability (see Table 3 and Fig. 1), which is equivalent to a difference of 10 to 21 % of a standard deviation in WEMWBS score (based on WEMWBS score SD = 8). Adjustment for covariates had a similar impact on effect estimates across cohorts; few of the adjustments for individual covariates attenuated the associations greatly with the exception of adjustment for neuroticism (results not shown). In fully adjusted models, associations between physical capability and WEMWBS remained, albeit attenuated (Table 3).Table 3

Bottom Line: Data from each study were analysed separately and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses.When adjusted for body size, health status, living alone, socioeconomic position and neuroticism the associations remained albeit attenuated.The finding of these consistent modest associations across five studies, spanning early and later old age, highlights the importance of maintaining physical capability in later life and provides additional justification for using objective measures of physical capability as markers of healthy ageing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MRC Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing, University College London, 33 Bedford Place, London, WC1B 5JU, UK, r.cooper@nshd.mrc.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Objective measures of physical capability are being used in a growing number of studies as biomarkers of healthy ageing. However, very little research has been done to assess the impact of physical capability on subsequent positive mental wellbeing, the maintenance of which is widely considered to be an essential component of healthy ageing. We aimed to test the associations of grip strength and walking, timed get up and go and chair rise speeds (assessed at ages 53 to 82 years) with positive mental wellbeing assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS) 5 to 10 years later. Data were drawn from five British cohorts participating in the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course research collaboration. Data from each study were analysed separately and then combined using random-effects meta-analyses. Higher levels of physical capability were consistently associated with higher subsequent levels of wellbeing; for example, a 1SD increase in grip strength was associated with an age and sex-adjusted mean difference in WEMWBS score of 0.81 (0.25, 1.37), equivalent to 10 % of a standard deviation (three studies, N = 3,096). When adjusted for body size, health status, living alone, socioeconomic position and neuroticism the associations remained albeit attenuated. The finding of these consistent modest associations across five studies, spanning early and later old age, highlights the importance of maintaining physical capability in later life and provides additional justification for using objective measures of physical capability as markers of healthy ageing.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus