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Role of the ventral striatum in developing anorexia nervosa.

Fladung AK, Schulze UM, Schöll F, Bauer K, Grön G - Transl Psychiatry (2013)

Bottom Line: Relative to age-matched, young healthy controls, underweight stimuli were already associated with greater activity of the ventral striatum, and processing of normal-weight stimuli elicited already reduced signalling.Subjective preferences showed exactly the same pattern of results.We discuss putative mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the development of AN, and also deduce new hypotheses about the involvement of the midbrain dopamine system, of which illness-related alterations may contribute to the development of AN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Functional imaging data in adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) support a dysfunctional signal in the ventral striatum as neural signature of AN. In the present study, development of this signal was investigated with the prediction that a characteristic pattern of ventral-striatal signalling will be shown in response to cues associated with food restriction that reflects the evolvement of starvation dependence over time. The signal was assessed in adolescent patients with AN, whose duration of illness was about five times shorter relative to the adult sample. During functional magnetic resonance imaging subjects were required to estimate weights of body images (underweight, normal weight, overweight) and to process each stimulus in a self-referring way. Relative to age-matched, young healthy controls, underweight stimuli were already associated with greater activity of the ventral striatum, and processing of normal-weight stimuli elicited already reduced signalling. Subjective preferences showed exactly the same pattern of results. Relative to adult AN, the present data reveal a developing dysfunctional signal that, if untreated, will essentially contribute to the maintenance of AN. We discuss putative mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the development of AN, and also deduce new hypotheses about the involvement of the midbrain dopamine system, of which illness-related alterations may contribute to the development of AN.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Significant (P<0.05, family-wise error-corrected) group-by-stimulus interaction for the ‘feel' task in the left and right ventral striatum (see Table 2 for MNI coordinates of the left and right peak voxels and associated statistics). Bar charts show parameter estimates of blood oxygen level dependent responses averaged across significant voxels in young women with anorexia nervosa and healthy controls. Error is the 95% confidence interval.
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fig2: Significant (P<0.05, family-wise error-corrected) group-by-stimulus interaction for the ‘feel' task in the left and right ventral striatum (see Table 2 for MNI coordinates of the left and right peak voxels and associated statistics). Bar charts show parameter estimates of blood oxygen level dependent responses averaged across significant voxels in young women with anorexia nervosa and healthy controls. Error is the 95% confidence interval.

Mentions: Single-tailed t-contrasts testing revealed that relative to controls the significant group-by-stimulus interaction was driven by higher activity in patients upon processing underweight stimuli and by lower neural activity when processing normal-weight images (Figure 2 and Table 2). The inverted t-contrast within the ROI did not yield significant effects (P>0.05, uncorrected). Post-hoc tests (directed t-contrasts; nominal level of P<0.05, uncorrected) on between-group differences for those voxels significant in the above single-tailed interaction t-contrast could also show that patients' increased neural activity upon underweight stimuli was significantly different from that of controls only in the left (P<0.018) but not in the right ventral striatum (P=0.075). In contrast, in both parts of the ventral striatum controls' neural activity upon normal-weight stimuli was significantly greater than that of patients (left: P=0.002; right: P<0.001). Post-hoc testing on within-group differences showed that in the left (P<0.001) and right (P<0.001) ventral striatum controls showed significantly increased neural activity upon normal-weight stimuli compared to underweight stimuli. In patients neural activity upon both stimulus categories was alike in both parts of the ventral striatum (left: P=0.480; right: P=0.417; Figure 2).


Role of the ventral striatum in developing anorexia nervosa.

Fladung AK, Schulze UM, Schöll F, Bauer K, Grön G - Transl Psychiatry (2013)

Significant (P<0.05, family-wise error-corrected) group-by-stimulus interaction for the ‘feel' task in the left and right ventral striatum (see Table 2 for MNI coordinates of the left and right peak voxels and associated statistics). Bar charts show parameter estimates of blood oxygen level dependent responses averaged across significant voxels in young women with anorexia nervosa and healthy controls. Error is the 95% confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3818005&req=5

fig2: Significant (P<0.05, family-wise error-corrected) group-by-stimulus interaction for the ‘feel' task in the left and right ventral striatum (see Table 2 for MNI coordinates of the left and right peak voxels and associated statistics). Bar charts show parameter estimates of blood oxygen level dependent responses averaged across significant voxels in young women with anorexia nervosa and healthy controls. Error is the 95% confidence interval.
Mentions: Single-tailed t-contrasts testing revealed that relative to controls the significant group-by-stimulus interaction was driven by higher activity in patients upon processing underweight stimuli and by lower neural activity when processing normal-weight images (Figure 2 and Table 2). The inverted t-contrast within the ROI did not yield significant effects (P>0.05, uncorrected). Post-hoc tests (directed t-contrasts; nominal level of P<0.05, uncorrected) on between-group differences for those voxels significant in the above single-tailed interaction t-contrast could also show that patients' increased neural activity upon underweight stimuli was significantly different from that of controls only in the left (P<0.018) but not in the right ventral striatum (P=0.075). In contrast, in both parts of the ventral striatum controls' neural activity upon normal-weight stimuli was significantly greater than that of patients (left: P=0.002; right: P<0.001). Post-hoc testing on within-group differences showed that in the left (P<0.001) and right (P<0.001) ventral striatum controls showed significantly increased neural activity upon normal-weight stimuli compared to underweight stimuli. In patients neural activity upon both stimulus categories was alike in both parts of the ventral striatum (left: P=0.480; right: P=0.417; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Relative to age-matched, young healthy controls, underweight stimuli were already associated with greater activity of the ventral striatum, and processing of normal-weight stimuli elicited already reduced signalling.Subjective preferences showed exactly the same pattern of results.We discuss putative mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the development of AN, and also deduce new hypotheses about the involvement of the midbrain dopamine system, of which illness-related alterations may contribute to the development of AN.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Functional imaging data in adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) support a dysfunctional signal in the ventral striatum as neural signature of AN. In the present study, development of this signal was investigated with the prediction that a characteristic pattern of ventral-striatal signalling will be shown in response to cues associated with food restriction that reflects the evolvement of starvation dependence over time. The signal was assessed in adolescent patients with AN, whose duration of illness was about five times shorter relative to the adult sample. During functional magnetic resonance imaging subjects were required to estimate weights of body images (underweight, normal weight, overweight) and to process each stimulus in a self-referring way. Relative to age-matched, young healthy controls, underweight stimuli were already associated with greater activity of the ventral striatum, and processing of normal-weight stimuli elicited already reduced signalling. Subjective preferences showed exactly the same pattern of results. Relative to adult AN, the present data reveal a developing dysfunctional signal that, if untreated, will essentially contribute to the maintenance of AN. We discuss putative mechanisms that may play a crucial role in the development of AN, and also deduce new hypotheses about the involvement of the midbrain dopamine system, of which illness-related alterations may contribute to the development of AN.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus