Limits...
Translocation and insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis living inside of plants.

Monnerat RG, Soares CM, Capdeville G, Jones G, Martins ES, Praça L, Cordeiro BA, Braz SV, dos Santos RC, Berry C - Microb Biotechnol (2009)

Bottom Line: The ability of B. thuringiensis to colonize plants as an endophyte was further established by the introduction of a strain marked by production of green fluorescent protein (GFP).Leaves taken from the treated plants were able to cause toxicity when fed to the Lepidoptera Spodoptera frugiperda (cotton) and Plutella xylostella (cabbage).These results open up new horizons for understanding the natural ecology and evolution of B. thuringiensis and use of B. thuringiensis in insect control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Embrapa Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Parque Estação Biológica, Av W/5 Norte (final), CEP 70 770-900, Caixa Postal 02372, Brasília DF, Brazil. rose@cenargen.embrapa.br

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815911&req=5

Mentions: To confirm uptake of Bt into plants independent of GFP, accumulation of Bt in the leaves was studied by autoradiography following inoculation of plants with radiolabelled bacteria (Fig. 2). The radioactivity could be detected in all parts of inoculated plants. In contrast, the radioactivity was not detected in plants inoculated with the final wash solution used to remove residual, unincorporated 35S‐methionine from the preparation and thus providing a control demonstrating that the label observed on addition of Bt was not due to unincorporated radiolabel.


Translocation and insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis living inside of plants.

Monnerat RG, Soares CM, Capdeville G, Jones G, Martins ES, Praça L, Cordeiro BA, Braz SV, dos Santos RC, Berry C - Microb Biotechnol (2009)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815911&req=5

Mentions: To confirm uptake of Bt into plants independent of GFP, accumulation of Bt in the leaves was studied by autoradiography following inoculation of plants with radiolabelled bacteria (Fig. 2). The radioactivity could be detected in all parts of inoculated plants. In contrast, the radioactivity was not detected in plants inoculated with the final wash solution used to remove residual, unincorporated 35S‐methionine from the preparation and thus providing a control demonstrating that the label observed on addition of Bt was not due to unincorporated radiolabel.

Bottom Line: The ability of B. thuringiensis to colonize plants as an endophyte was further established by the introduction of a strain marked by production of green fluorescent protein (GFP).Leaves taken from the treated plants were able to cause toxicity when fed to the Lepidoptera Spodoptera frugiperda (cotton) and Plutella xylostella (cabbage).These results open up new horizons for understanding the natural ecology and evolution of B. thuringiensis and use of B. thuringiensis in insect control.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Embrapa Recursos Geneticos e Biotecnologia, Parque Estação Biológica, Av W/5 Norte (final), CEP 70 770-900, Caixa Postal 02372, Brasília DF, Brazil. rose@cenargen.embrapa.br

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus