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Streptomyces lividans inhibits the proliferation of the fungus Verticillium dahliae on seeds and roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

Meschke H, Schrempf H - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

Bottom Line: The extension of hyphae from each individual strain correlates with the reduction of the pectin-containing mucilage-layer.As a result, plants have considerably reduced disease symptoms.As spores of the beneficial S. lividans strain are obtainable in large quantity, its application is highly attractive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: FB Biology/Chemistry, Applied Genetics of Microorganisms, University of Osnabrück, Barbarastr. 13, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany.

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Mentions: Seeds were inoculated on agar plates (without extra carbon source) in the absence or the presence of V. dahliae or S. lividans. Alternatively, seeds were grown alone or together with both partners. During the first 23 h, hyphae of S. lividans or V. dahliae started to proliferate within the mucilage. After 3 days of co‐cultivation, seeds were investigated with Ruthenium red (Fig. 4A–F), a dye that interacts with acidic polysaccharides (Western et al., 2000). The mucilage of the A. thaliana seed had a gel‐like, pink‐violet stain and appeared intact (Fig. 4A and D, controls). The incubation of A. thaliana seeds together with S. lividans (Fig. 4B and E) provoked a massive proliferation of S. lividans hyphae, which correlated with a reduction in staining (Fig. 4B and E). The growth of V. dahliae hyphae led to massive dismantling of the mucilage (Fig. 4C and F).


Streptomyces lividans inhibits the proliferation of the fungus Verticillium dahliae on seeds and roots of Arabidopsis thaliana.

Meschke H, Schrempf H - Microb Biotechnol (2010)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815809&req=5

Mentions: Seeds were inoculated on agar plates (without extra carbon source) in the absence or the presence of V. dahliae or S. lividans. Alternatively, seeds were grown alone or together with both partners. During the first 23 h, hyphae of S. lividans or V. dahliae started to proliferate within the mucilage. After 3 days of co‐cultivation, seeds were investigated with Ruthenium red (Fig. 4A–F), a dye that interacts with acidic polysaccharides (Western et al., 2000). The mucilage of the A. thaliana seed had a gel‐like, pink‐violet stain and appeared intact (Fig. 4A and D, controls). The incubation of A. thaliana seeds together with S. lividans (Fig. 4B and E) provoked a massive proliferation of S. lividans hyphae, which correlated with a reduction in staining (Fig. 4B and E). The growth of V. dahliae hyphae led to massive dismantling of the mucilage (Fig. 4C and F).

Bottom Line: The extension of hyphae from each individual strain correlates with the reduction of the pectin-containing mucilage-layer.As a result, plants have considerably reduced disease symptoms.As spores of the beneficial S. lividans strain are obtainable in large quantity, its application is highly attractive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: FB Biology/Chemistry, Applied Genetics of Microorganisms, University of Osnabrück, Barbarastr. 13, 49069 Osnabrück, Germany.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus