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Monitoring of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strains during tomato plant infection.

Validov SZ, Kamilova FD, Lugtenberg BJ - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: In 3-week-old plantlets the concentration of Forl ZUM2407 DNA was at least 10 times higher than those of the other strains.Our results show that targeting of the multicopy ribosomal operon results in a highly sensitive qPCR reaction for the detection of Fox DNA.Nevertheless, the observed difference in levels of plant colonization between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains strongly suggests that a concentration of Fox DNA in plant material above the threshold level of 0.005% is due to proliferation of pathogenic Fox.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leiden University, Institute of Biology, Sylviusweg 72, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands. svalidov@yandex.ru

ABSTRACT
Monitoring of pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum (Fox), which cause wilt and rots on agricultural and ornamental plants, is important for predicting disease outbreaks. Since both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Fox are ubiquitous and are able to colonize plant roots, detection of Fox DNA in plant material is not the ultimate proof of an ongoing infection which would cause damage to the plant. We followed the colonization of tomato plants by strains Fox f. sp. radicis-lycopersici ZUM2407 (a tomato foot and root rot pathogen), Fox f. sp. radiciscucumerinum V03-2g (a cucumber root rot pathogen) and Fox Fo47 (a well-known non-pathogenic biocontrol strain). We determined fungal DNA concentrations in tomato plantlets by quantitative PCR (qPCR) with primers complementary to the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of these three Fox strains. Two weeks after inoculation of tomato seedlings with these Fox strains, the DNA concentration of Forl ZUM2407 was five times higher than that of the non-compatible pathogen Forc V03-2g and 10 times higher than that of Fo47. In 3-week-old plantlets the concentration of Forl ZUM2407 DNA was at least 10 times higher than those of the other strains. The fungal DNA concentration, as determined by qPCR, appeared to be in good agreement with data of the score of visible symptoms of tomato foot and root rot obtained 3 weeks after inoculation of tomato with Forl ZUM2407. Our results show that targeting of the multicopy ribosomal operon results in a highly sensitive qPCR reaction for the detection of Fox DNA. Since formae speciales of Fox cannot be distinguished by comparison of ribosomal operons, detection of Fox DNA is not evidence of plant infection by a compatible pathogen. Nevertheless, the observed difference in levels of plant colonization between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains strongly suggests that a concentration of Fox DNA in plant material above the threshold level of 0.005% is due to proliferation of pathogenic Fox.

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Mentions: Tomato seeds were inoculated with strains Forl ZUM2407, Forc V03‐2g and non‐pathogenic Fox Fo47 in concentrations of 105 spores per litre of PNS. No difference in rate and level of germination was observed between untreated seeds and seeds inoculated with any of these three Fox strains. Tomato plants harvested 1 week after sowing had no symptoms of TFRR. Two‐ and three‐week‐old tomato plants sometimes had brownish lesion and some of the plants were dead. The results of the disease evaluation in which no differences in the extension of the lesions were taken into account are shown in Fig. 2A. Among the inoculated 2‐week‐old plants, no statistical difference in disease incidence was evident (Fig. 1A), but the disease was more severe on plants treated with Forl ZUM2407 (Fig. 1B). Actually tomato plants inoculated with Forc V03‐2g and Fox Fo47 strains had mainly light lesions. Three weeks post inoculation both disease incidence and severity were statistically higher on tomato plants inoculated with Forl ZUM2407 (Fig. 1A and B)


Monitoring of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum strains during tomato plant infection.

Validov SZ, Kamilova FD, Lugtenberg BJ - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815798&req=5

Mentions: Tomato seeds were inoculated with strains Forl ZUM2407, Forc V03‐2g and non‐pathogenic Fox Fo47 in concentrations of 105 spores per litre of PNS. No difference in rate and level of germination was observed between untreated seeds and seeds inoculated with any of these three Fox strains. Tomato plants harvested 1 week after sowing had no symptoms of TFRR. Two‐ and three‐week‐old tomato plants sometimes had brownish lesion and some of the plants were dead. The results of the disease evaluation in which no differences in the extension of the lesions were taken into account are shown in Fig. 2A. Among the inoculated 2‐week‐old plants, no statistical difference in disease incidence was evident (Fig. 1A), but the disease was more severe on plants treated with Forl ZUM2407 (Fig. 1B). Actually tomato plants inoculated with Forc V03‐2g and Fox Fo47 strains had mainly light lesions. Three weeks post inoculation both disease incidence and severity were statistically higher on tomato plants inoculated with Forl ZUM2407 (Fig. 1A and B)

Bottom Line: In 3-week-old plantlets the concentration of Forl ZUM2407 DNA was at least 10 times higher than those of the other strains.Our results show that targeting of the multicopy ribosomal operon results in a highly sensitive qPCR reaction for the detection of Fox DNA.Nevertheless, the observed difference in levels of plant colonization between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains strongly suggests that a concentration of Fox DNA in plant material above the threshold level of 0.005% is due to proliferation of pathogenic Fox.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Leiden University, Institute of Biology, Sylviusweg 72, 2333 BE Leiden, The Netherlands. svalidov@yandex.ru

ABSTRACT
Monitoring of pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum (Fox), which cause wilt and rots on agricultural and ornamental plants, is important for predicting disease outbreaks. Since both pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Fox are ubiquitous and are able to colonize plant roots, detection of Fox DNA in plant material is not the ultimate proof of an ongoing infection which would cause damage to the plant. We followed the colonization of tomato plants by strains Fox f. sp. radicis-lycopersici ZUM2407 (a tomato foot and root rot pathogen), Fox f. sp. radiciscucumerinum V03-2g (a cucumber root rot pathogen) and Fox Fo47 (a well-known non-pathogenic biocontrol strain). We determined fungal DNA concentrations in tomato plantlets by quantitative PCR (qPCR) with primers complementary to the intergenic spacer region (IGS) of these three Fox strains. Two weeks after inoculation of tomato seedlings with these Fox strains, the DNA concentration of Forl ZUM2407 was five times higher than that of the non-compatible pathogen Forc V03-2g and 10 times higher than that of Fo47. In 3-week-old plantlets the concentration of Forl ZUM2407 DNA was at least 10 times higher than those of the other strains. The fungal DNA concentration, as determined by qPCR, appeared to be in good agreement with data of the score of visible symptoms of tomato foot and root rot obtained 3 weeks after inoculation of tomato with Forl ZUM2407. Our results show that targeting of the multicopy ribosomal operon results in a highly sensitive qPCR reaction for the detection of Fox DNA. Since formae speciales of Fox cannot be distinguished by comparison of ribosomal operons, detection of Fox DNA is not evidence of plant infection by a compatible pathogen. Nevertheless, the observed difference in levels of plant colonization between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains strongly suggests that a concentration of Fox DNA in plant material above the threshold level of 0.005% is due to proliferation of pathogenic Fox.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus