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Diversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in paddy soil and their response to elevated atmospheric CO₂.

Feng Y, Lin X, Mao T, Zhu J - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: The community structure of AAnPB in bulk and rhizospheric soils stayed almost identical, while the population size was higher in rhizospheric [2.0–2.5 x 10⁸ copy number of pufM genes g-1 dry weight soil (d.w.s.)] than that in bulk (0.7–0.8 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) soils.Elevated atmospheric CO2 appeared to significantly stimulate AAnPB abundance (up to 1.4–1.5 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) and result in a higher AAnPB percentage in total bacterial community (from 0.5% up to 1.5%) in bulk soil, whereas no significant effect was observed in rhizospheric soil.Our results would extend the functional ecotypes of AAnPB and indicate that environmental changes associated with the rising atmospheric CO₂ might affect AAnPB community in paddy soil.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province, China.

ABSTRACT
Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAnPB) are recognized as an important group driving the global carbon cycling. However, the diversity of AAnPB in terrestrial environment remains largely unknown as well as their responses to the elevated atmospheric CO2. By using culture-independent techniques, the diversity of AAnPB in paddy soil and the changes in response to the rising atmospheric CO₂ were investigated within China FACE (Free-air CO₂ enrichment) platform. There was a phylogenetically diverse AAnPB community with large population size residing in paddy soil. The community structure of AAnPB in bulk and rhizospheric soils stayed almost identical, while the population size was higher in rhizospheric [2.0–2.5 x 10⁸ copy number of pufM genes g-1 dry weight soil (d.w.s.)] than that in bulk (0.7–0.8 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) soils. Elevated atmospheric CO2 appeared to significantly stimulate AAnPB abundance (up to 1.4–1.5 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) and result in a higher AAnPB percentage in total bacterial community (from 0.5% up to 1.5%) in bulk soil, whereas no significant effect was observed in rhizospheric soil. Our results would extend the functional ecotypes of AAnPB and indicate that environmental changes associated with the rising atmospheric CO₂ might affect AAnPB community in paddy soil.

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The copy numbers of pufM gene in paddy soils with different treatments quantified by two different assays (A); The copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the ratios of pufM gene to bacterial 16S rRNA gene (B). The significant difference was indicated by the different letters above the standard error bar (P < 0.05).
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f3: The copy numbers of pufM gene in paddy soils with different treatments quantified by two different assays (A); The copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the ratios of pufM gene to bacterial 16S rRNA gene (B). The significant difference was indicated by the different letters above the standard error bar (P < 0.05).

Mentions: Because primer sets pufM 557F/WAW and pufM 557F/750R were both used to investigate AAnPB diversity in the previous reports (Hu et al., 2006; Waidner and Kirchman, 2008), they were chosen and validated each other in this study. The higher copy number of soil pufM gene was detected by pufM 557F/WAW than pufM 557F/750R assays (Fig. 3A), although both assays revealed the similar changing pattern of pufM genes in paddy soil. This indicated the former assay might be better suited for pufM gene quantification in paddy soils than the latter. The pufM gene abundance by pufM 557F/WAW assay varied from 0.7–1.5 × 108 g−1 d.w.s. in bulk soil and 2.0–2.5 × 108 g−1 d.w.s. in rhizospheric soil (Fig. 3A). It indicated that AAnPB abundance in rhizospheric soil was significantly larger than that in bulk soil (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the copy numbers of pufM genes in bulk soil were higher under FACE treatment than Ambient treatment ranging from 0.7–0.8 × 108 to 1.4–1.5 × 108 g−1 d.w.s., whereas no apparent difference was observed in rhizospheric soil. In addition, N fertilization treatment had little effect.


Diversity of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria in paddy soil and their response to elevated atmospheric CO₂.

Feng Y, Lin X, Mao T, Zhu J - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

The copy numbers of pufM gene in paddy soils with different treatments quantified by two different assays (A); The copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the ratios of pufM gene to bacterial 16S rRNA gene (B). The significant difference was indicated by the different letters above the standard error bar (P < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815797&req=5

f3: The copy numbers of pufM gene in paddy soils with different treatments quantified by two different assays (A); The copy numbers of bacterial 16S rRNA gene and the ratios of pufM gene to bacterial 16S rRNA gene (B). The significant difference was indicated by the different letters above the standard error bar (P < 0.05).
Mentions: Because primer sets pufM 557F/WAW and pufM 557F/750R were both used to investigate AAnPB diversity in the previous reports (Hu et al., 2006; Waidner and Kirchman, 2008), they were chosen and validated each other in this study. The higher copy number of soil pufM gene was detected by pufM 557F/WAW than pufM 557F/750R assays (Fig. 3A), although both assays revealed the similar changing pattern of pufM genes in paddy soil. This indicated the former assay might be better suited for pufM gene quantification in paddy soils than the latter. The pufM gene abundance by pufM 557F/WAW assay varied from 0.7–1.5 × 108 g−1 d.w.s. in bulk soil and 2.0–2.5 × 108 g−1 d.w.s. in rhizospheric soil (Fig. 3A). It indicated that AAnPB abundance in rhizospheric soil was significantly larger than that in bulk soil (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the copy numbers of pufM genes in bulk soil were higher under FACE treatment than Ambient treatment ranging from 0.7–0.8 × 108 to 1.4–1.5 × 108 g−1 d.w.s., whereas no apparent difference was observed in rhizospheric soil. In addition, N fertilization treatment had little effect.

Bottom Line: The community structure of AAnPB in bulk and rhizospheric soils stayed almost identical, while the population size was higher in rhizospheric [2.0–2.5 x 10⁸ copy number of pufM genes g-1 dry weight soil (d.w.s.)] than that in bulk (0.7–0.8 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) soils.Elevated atmospheric CO2 appeared to significantly stimulate AAnPB abundance (up to 1.4–1.5 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) and result in a higher AAnPB percentage in total bacterial community (from 0.5% up to 1.5%) in bulk soil, whereas no significant effect was observed in rhizospheric soil.Our results would extend the functional ecotypes of AAnPB and indicate that environmental changes associated with the rising atmospheric CO₂ might affect AAnPB community in paddy soil.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008, Jiangsu Province, China.

ABSTRACT
Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria (AAnPB) are recognized as an important group driving the global carbon cycling. However, the diversity of AAnPB in terrestrial environment remains largely unknown as well as their responses to the elevated atmospheric CO2. By using culture-independent techniques, the diversity of AAnPB in paddy soil and the changes in response to the rising atmospheric CO₂ were investigated within China FACE (Free-air CO₂ enrichment) platform. There was a phylogenetically diverse AAnPB community with large population size residing in paddy soil. The community structure of AAnPB in bulk and rhizospheric soils stayed almost identical, while the population size was higher in rhizospheric [2.0–2.5 x 10⁸ copy number of pufM genes g-1 dry weight soil (d.w.s.)] than that in bulk (0.7–0.8 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) soils. Elevated atmospheric CO2 appeared to significantly stimulate AAnPB abundance (up to 1.4–1.5 x 10⁸ g-1 d.w.s.) and result in a higher AAnPB percentage in total bacterial community (from 0.5% up to 1.5%) in bulk soil, whereas no significant effect was observed in rhizospheric soil. Our results would extend the functional ecotypes of AAnPB and indicate that environmental changes associated with the rising atmospheric CO₂ might affect AAnPB community in paddy soil.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus