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The 'LipoYeasts' project: using the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in combination with specific bacterial genes for the bioconversion of lipids, fats and oils into high-value products.

Sabirova JS, Haddouche R, Van Bogaert I, Mulaa F, Verstraete W, Timmis K, Schmidt-Dannert C, Nicaud J, Soetaert W - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production.A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products.Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. julia.sabirova@ugent.be

ABSTRACT
The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production. A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products. Under the EU-sponsored LipoYeasts project we are developing the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica into a versatile and high-throughput microbial factory that, by use of specific enzymatic pathways from hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, efficiently mobilizes lipids by directing its versatile lipid metabolism towards the production of industrially valuable lipid-derived compounds like wax esters (WE), isoprenoid-derived compounds (carotenoids, polyenic carotenoid ester), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and free hydroxylated fatty acids (HFAs). Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proposed structure of stacked polyenic carotenoid ester chains.
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f6: Proposed structure of stacked polyenic carotenoid ester chains.

Mentions: Polyenic polymers are new types of specialized, conducting polymers (Fig. 6) – also referred to as electronic plastics – have been developed for applications in an emerging class of ‘plastic’ opto‐electronic devices such as lasers, ultra fast image processors, thin‐film transistors, highly sensitive plastic photodiodes and photodiode arrays and all‐polymer integrated circuits. These new polymers, like other commonly used plastics, are chemically synthesized from petroleum‐derived building blocks. Biological routes to functional materials independent petroleum‐based economy could instead be described as a biorefinery process in which biomass components are converted into high‐value compounds.


The 'LipoYeasts' project: using the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in combination with specific bacterial genes for the bioconversion of lipids, fats and oils into high-value products.

Sabirova JS, Haddouche R, Van Bogaert I, Mulaa F, Verstraete W, Timmis K, Schmidt-Dannert C, Nicaud J, Soetaert W - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Proposed structure of stacked polyenic carotenoid ester chains.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815794&req=5

f6: Proposed structure of stacked polyenic carotenoid ester chains.
Mentions: Polyenic polymers are new types of specialized, conducting polymers (Fig. 6) – also referred to as electronic plastics – have been developed for applications in an emerging class of ‘plastic’ opto‐electronic devices such as lasers, ultra fast image processors, thin‐film transistors, highly sensitive plastic photodiodes and photodiode arrays and all‐polymer integrated circuits. These new polymers, like other commonly used plastics, are chemically synthesized from petroleum‐derived building blocks. Biological routes to functional materials independent petroleum‐based economy could instead be described as a biorefinery process in which biomass components are converted into high‐value compounds.

Bottom Line: The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production.A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products.Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. julia.sabirova@ugent.be

ABSTRACT
The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production. A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products. Under the EU-sponsored LipoYeasts project we are developing the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica into a versatile and high-throughput microbial factory that, by use of specific enzymatic pathways from hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, efficiently mobilizes lipids by directing its versatile lipid metabolism towards the production of industrially valuable lipid-derived compounds like wax esters (WE), isoprenoid-derived compounds (carotenoids, polyenic carotenoid ester), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and free hydroxylated fatty acids (HFAs). Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus