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The 'LipoYeasts' project: using the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in combination with specific bacterial genes for the bioconversion of lipids, fats and oils into high-value products.

Sabirova JS, Haddouche R, Van Bogaert I, Mulaa F, Verstraete W, Timmis K, Schmidt-Dannert C, Nicaud J, Soetaert W - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production.A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products.Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. julia.sabirova@ugent.be

ABSTRACT
The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production. A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products. Under the EU-sponsored LipoYeasts project we are developing the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica into a versatile and high-throughput microbial factory that, by use of specific enzymatic pathways from hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, efficiently mobilizes lipids by directing its versatile lipid metabolism towards the production of industrially valuable lipid-derived compounds like wax esters (WE), isoprenoid-derived compounds (carotenoids, polyenic carotenoid ester), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and free hydroxylated fatty acids (HFAs). Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

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Examples of carotenoid structures.
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f5: Examples of carotenoid structures.

Mentions: Carotenoids represent a large group of structurally diverse pigments synthesized by microorganisms and plants (Fig. 5). Carotenoids are used commercially as food colorants, feed supplements, nutraceuticals and for cosmetic and pharmaceutical purposes. Of the more than 600 different carotenoids identified in nature, only a small number can be synthesized in useful quantities by chemical synthesis, extraction from their natural sources or microbial fermentation (reviewed in Lee and Schmidt‐Dannert, 2002).


The 'LipoYeasts' project: using the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica in combination with specific bacterial genes for the bioconversion of lipids, fats and oils into high-value products.

Sabirova JS, Haddouche R, Van Bogaert I, Mulaa F, Verstraete W, Timmis K, Schmidt-Dannert C, Nicaud J, Soetaert W - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Examples of carotenoid structures.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815794&req=5

f5: Examples of carotenoid structures.
Mentions: Carotenoids represent a large group of structurally diverse pigments synthesized by microorganisms and plants (Fig. 5). Carotenoids are used commercially as food colorants, feed supplements, nutraceuticals and for cosmetic and pharmaceutical purposes. Of the more than 600 different carotenoids identified in nature, only a small number can be synthesized in useful quantities by chemical synthesis, extraction from their natural sources or microbial fermentation (reviewed in Lee and Schmidt‐Dannert, 2002).

Bottom Line: The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production.A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products.Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium. julia.sabirova@ugent.be

ABSTRACT
The oleochemical industry is currently still dominated by conventional chemistry, with biotechnology only starting to play a more prominent role, primarily with respect to the biosurfactants or lipases, e.g. as detergents, or for biofuel production. A major bottleneck for all further biotechnological applications is the problem of the initial mobilization of cheap and vastly available lipid and oil substrates, which are then to be transformed into high-value biotechnological, nutritional or pharmacological products. Under the EU-sponsored LipoYeasts project we are developing the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica into a versatile and high-throughput microbial factory that, by use of specific enzymatic pathways from hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, efficiently mobilizes lipids by directing its versatile lipid metabolism towards the production of industrially valuable lipid-derived compounds like wax esters (WE), isoprenoid-derived compounds (carotenoids, polyenic carotenoid ester), polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and free hydroxylated fatty acids (HFAs). Different lipid stocks (petroleum, alkane, vegetable oil, fatty acid) and combinations thereof are being assessed as substrates in combination with different mutant and recombinant strains of Y. lipolytica, in order to modulate the composition and yields of the produced added-value products.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus