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Systems biology in vaccine design.

Six A, Bellier B, Thomas-Vaslin V, Klatzmann D - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: Vaccines are the most effective tools to prevent infectious diseases and to minimize their impact on humans or animals.Despite the successful development of vaccines that are able to elicit potent and protective immune responses, the majority of vaccines have been so far developed empirically and mechanistic events leading to protective immune responses are often poorly understood.This hampers the development of new prophylactic as well as therapeutic vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7211, F-75013 Paris, France. adrien.six@upmc.fr

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Systems vaccinology: from vaccine conception and design to protection of the organism. The goal of a good vaccine is to obtain a sustained immune memory in T‐ and/or B‐cell compartments, allowing the host to respond more rapidly and with more efficiency to gain the race against an infectious challenge (prophylactic vaccines) or a tumour (therapeutic vaccines). Note that the design of the vaccine and the immunocompetence of the host are determinant for triggering an effective protection. After designing a vaccine, systems vaccinology is helpful to evaluate the host complex immune response at various levels of biological organization (from molecule to organism), considering actors from the innate or adaptive immune system. This approach establishes predictions, correlates or models that help to validate and refine the vaccine.
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f1: Systems vaccinology: from vaccine conception and design to protection of the organism. The goal of a good vaccine is to obtain a sustained immune memory in T‐ and/or B‐cell compartments, allowing the host to respond more rapidly and with more efficiency to gain the race against an infectious challenge (prophylactic vaccines) or a tumour (therapeutic vaccines). Note that the design of the vaccine and the immunocompetence of the host are determinant for triggering an effective protection. After designing a vaccine, systems vaccinology is helpful to evaluate the host complex immune response at various levels of biological organization (from molecule to organism), considering actors from the innate or adaptive immune system. This approach establishes predictions, correlates or models that help to validate and refine the vaccine.

Mentions: Vaccines are currently most effective treatments in preventing a number of infectious diseases and minimizing their impact on human or animal populations. A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease upon administration to an animal/human. A vaccine typically contains one or several antigens that resemble a disease‐causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe or its derived antigenic proteins or its toxins + adjuvant. The antigens stimulate the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, induces specific immune responses (immunogenicity). Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or reduce the effects of a future infection by any natural pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer). An ideal vaccine must have particular biological and physical characteristics, and vaccine development must gain from new technology advances (Levine and Sztein, 2004).


Systems biology in vaccine design.

Six A, Bellier B, Thomas-Vaslin V, Klatzmann D - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Systems vaccinology: from vaccine conception and design to protection of the organism. The goal of a good vaccine is to obtain a sustained immune memory in T‐ and/or B‐cell compartments, allowing the host to respond more rapidly and with more efficiency to gain the race against an infectious challenge (prophylactic vaccines) or a tumour (therapeutic vaccines). Note that the design of the vaccine and the immunocompetence of the host are determinant for triggering an effective protection. After designing a vaccine, systems vaccinology is helpful to evaluate the host complex immune response at various levels of biological organization (from molecule to organism), considering actors from the innate or adaptive immune system. This approach establishes predictions, correlates or models that help to validate and refine the vaccine.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815789&req=5

f1: Systems vaccinology: from vaccine conception and design to protection of the organism. The goal of a good vaccine is to obtain a sustained immune memory in T‐ and/or B‐cell compartments, allowing the host to respond more rapidly and with more efficiency to gain the race against an infectious challenge (prophylactic vaccines) or a tumour (therapeutic vaccines). Note that the design of the vaccine and the immunocompetence of the host are determinant for triggering an effective protection. After designing a vaccine, systems vaccinology is helpful to evaluate the host complex immune response at various levels of biological organization (from molecule to organism), considering actors from the innate or adaptive immune system. This approach establishes predictions, correlates or models that help to validate and refine the vaccine.
Mentions: Vaccines are currently most effective treatments in preventing a number of infectious diseases and minimizing their impact on human or animal populations. A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease upon administration to an animal/human. A vaccine typically contains one or several antigens that resemble a disease‐causing microorganism, and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe or its derived antigenic proteins or its toxins + adjuvant. The antigens stimulate the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, induces specific immune responses (immunogenicity). Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or reduce the effects of a future infection by any natural pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer). An ideal vaccine must have particular biological and physical characteristics, and vaccine development must gain from new technology advances (Levine and Sztein, 2004).

Bottom Line: Vaccines are the most effective tools to prevent infectious diseases and to minimize their impact on humans or animals.Despite the successful development of vaccines that are able to elicit potent and protective immune responses, the majority of vaccines have been so far developed empirically and mechanistic events leading to protective immune responses are often poorly understood.This hampers the development of new prophylactic as well as therapeutic vaccines for infectious diseases and cancer.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7211, F-75013 Paris, France. adrien.six@upmc.fr

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus