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The role of the cell wall in fungal pathogenesis.

Arana DM, Prieto D, Román E, Nombela C, Alonso-Monge R, Pla J - Microb Biotechnol (2008)

Bottom Line: Specific components of the cell wall (called PAMPs) interact with specific receptors in the immune cell (called PRRs), triggering responses whose molecular mechanisms are being elucidated.We review here the main structural carbohydrate components of the fungal wall (glucan, mannan and chitin), how their biogenesis takes place in fungi and the specific receptors that they interact with.Different model fungal pathogens are chosen to illustrate the functional consequences of this interaction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Microbiología II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ramón y Cajal s/n, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Receptors involved in the interaction of fungal cell wall components with immune system cells. This figure depicts the multiple receptors that act either alone or simultaneously as sensors for different cell wall components of fungal cells walls. Receptor engagement induces intracellular signals that lead either to endocytosis and phagocytosis signalling or both of them. The receptors are not drawn to scale.
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f2: Receptors involved in the interaction of fungal cell wall components with immune system cells. This figure depicts the multiple receptors that act either alone or simultaneously as sensors for different cell wall components of fungal cells walls. Receptor engagement induces intracellular signals that lead either to endocytosis and phagocytosis signalling or both of them. The receptors are not drawn to scale.

Mentions: Recognition of pathogens by the innate immunity requires the identification of Pathogen‐Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs). These structures represent surface determinants that are absent in mammalian cells and are sensed by specific structures (called Pattern Recognition Receptors PRRs) present on the surface of the immune cells (Underhill and Ozinsky, 2002; Underhill, 2004). Different PRRs recognize different PAMPs and contribute in this way to the generation of a balanced response against microorganisms (Underhill, 2003b) (Fig. 2).


The role of the cell wall in fungal pathogenesis.

Arana DM, Prieto D, Román E, Nombela C, Alonso-Monge R, Pla J - Microb Biotechnol (2008)

Receptors involved in the interaction of fungal cell wall components with immune system cells. This figure depicts the multiple receptors that act either alone or simultaneously as sensors for different cell wall components of fungal cells walls. Receptor engagement induces intracellular signals that lead either to endocytosis and phagocytosis signalling or both of them. The receptors are not drawn to scale.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815752&req=5

f2: Receptors involved in the interaction of fungal cell wall components with immune system cells. This figure depicts the multiple receptors that act either alone or simultaneously as sensors for different cell wall components of fungal cells walls. Receptor engagement induces intracellular signals that lead either to endocytosis and phagocytosis signalling or both of them. The receptors are not drawn to scale.
Mentions: Recognition of pathogens by the innate immunity requires the identification of Pathogen‐Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs). These structures represent surface determinants that are absent in mammalian cells and are sensed by specific structures (called Pattern Recognition Receptors PRRs) present on the surface of the immune cells (Underhill and Ozinsky, 2002; Underhill, 2004). Different PRRs recognize different PAMPs and contribute in this way to the generation of a balanced response against microorganisms (Underhill, 2003b) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: Specific components of the cell wall (called PAMPs) interact with specific receptors in the immune cell (called PRRs), triggering responses whose molecular mechanisms are being elucidated.We review here the main structural carbohydrate components of the fungal wall (glucan, mannan and chitin), how their biogenesis takes place in fungi and the specific receptors that they interact with.Different model fungal pathogens are chosen to illustrate the functional consequences of this interaction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Microbiología II, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ramón y Cajal s/n, E-28040 Madrid, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus