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Growth phase-associated changes in the proteome and transcriptome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in industrial-type whey medium.

Laakso K, Koskenniemi K, Koponen J, Kankainen M, Surakka A, Salusjärvi T, Auvinen P, Savijoki K, Nyman TA, Kalkkinen N, Tynkkynen S, Varmanen P - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

Bottom Line: Of the significantly differentially produced proteins, 61 were associated with alterations at the transcript level.The most remarkable growth phase-dependent changes occurred during the transition from the exponential to the stationary growth phase and were associated with the shift from glucose fermentation to galactose utilization and the transition from homolactic to mixed acid fermentation.Furthermore, several genes encoding proteins proposed to promote the survival and persistence of L. rhamnosus GG in the host and proteins that directly contribute to human health showed temporal changes in expression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development, Valio Ltd, Helsinki, Finland.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

A model for physiological changes in L. rhamnosus GG during the progression of growth. Increased and decreased expression is indicated by plus symbol ‘+’ and minus symbol ‘−’ respectively.
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f5: A model for physiological changes in L. rhamnosus GG during the progression of growth. Increased and decreased expression is indicated by plus symbol ‘+’ and minus symbol ‘−’ respectively.

Mentions: Consumption of probiotic bacteria harvested at different phases of growth has been shown to cause profoundly different mucosal responses in human (van Baarlen et al., 2009). Accordingly, we assume that the expression status of the genes during the industrial cultivation of a probiotic reflects its activity in the GIT. We investigated how gene expression, at both the transcript and protein levels, in the probiotic bacterium, L. rhamnosus GG, changed over time during growth in industrial‐type whey medium under controlled bioreactor conditions. In particular, we aimed to determine whether any traits that are associated with the probiotic activity of L. rhamnosus GG were affected during the fermentation of whey. Expression of 636 genes, many implicated in the probiotic‐linked actions of L. rhamnosus GG, and 116 proteins were modulated in a growth‐dependent manner and half of the changes in protein abundance were associated with changes in transcript levels. Most of the observed growth phase‐dependent changes at both the mRNA and protein level appeared during the shift from the exponential growth phase to the stationary growth phase. In particular, genes and proteins involved in the galactose utilization pathways were among the highest induced upon entry into stationary phase. Many transcripts and proteins involved in central metabolic pathways such as carbohydrate, nucleotide, lipid and pyruvate metabolism were differentially expressed during growth in whey (Fig. 5). Differential expression of distinct carbohydrate utilization and energy production pathways and several distinct PTS transporters observed in response to changes in nutritional environment (e.g. exhaustion of the preferred carbon source in the medium) indicate that L. rhamnosus GG has a flexible and adaptable metabolism. This adaptability might provide a competitive advantage for L. rhamnosus GG in the host's GIT. Furthermore, expression of many genes encoding adhesion factors and secreted proteins with low molecular masses were increased over time during the growth of L. rhamnosus GG in whey medium (Fig. 5), with the highest expression in the stationary phase. The expression patterns of genes encoding mucus‐binding pili and secreted protein p40 differed from this general pattern (Fig. 5), having the highest expression values in the exponential phase. Like nutritional versatility, these adhesion and probiotic‐associated factors provide a competitive advantage for L. rhamnosus GG by promoting its survival and persistence in the GIT. At present, the number of probiotic‐associated factors of L. rhamnosus GG that has been identified is still limited which makes it impossible to draw conclusions about the optimal harvesting phase for this probiotic bacterium. However, as soon as the key mediators of probiotic traits have been identified, the results presented here together with future studies involving growth conditions mimicking those in the GIT will be instrumental for these purposes.


Growth phase-associated changes in the proteome and transcriptome of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG in industrial-type whey medium.

Laakso K, Koskenniemi K, Koponen J, Kankainen M, Surakka A, Salusjärvi T, Auvinen P, Savijoki K, Nyman TA, Kalkkinen N, Tynkkynen S, Varmanen P - Microb Biotechnol (2011)

A model for physiological changes in L. rhamnosus GG during the progression of growth. Increased and decreased expression is indicated by plus symbol ‘+’ and minus symbol ‘−’ respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC3815411&req=5

f5: A model for physiological changes in L. rhamnosus GG during the progression of growth. Increased and decreased expression is indicated by plus symbol ‘+’ and minus symbol ‘−’ respectively.
Mentions: Consumption of probiotic bacteria harvested at different phases of growth has been shown to cause profoundly different mucosal responses in human (van Baarlen et al., 2009). Accordingly, we assume that the expression status of the genes during the industrial cultivation of a probiotic reflects its activity in the GIT. We investigated how gene expression, at both the transcript and protein levels, in the probiotic bacterium, L. rhamnosus GG, changed over time during growth in industrial‐type whey medium under controlled bioreactor conditions. In particular, we aimed to determine whether any traits that are associated with the probiotic activity of L. rhamnosus GG were affected during the fermentation of whey. Expression of 636 genes, many implicated in the probiotic‐linked actions of L. rhamnosus GG, and 116 proteins were modulated in a growth‐dependent manner and half of the changes in protein abundance were associated with changes in transcript levels. Most of the observed growth phase‐dependent changes at both the mRNA and protein level appeared during the shift from the exponential growth phase to the stationary growth phase. In particular, genes and proteins involved in the galactose utilization pathways were among the highest induced upon entry into stationary phase. Many transcripts and proteins involved in central metabolic pathways such as carbohydrate, nucleotide, lipid and pyruvate metabolism were differentially expressed during growth in whey (Fig. 5). Differential expression of distinct carbohydrate utilization and energy production pathways and several distinct PTS transporters observed in response to changes in nutritional environment (e.g. exhaustion of the preferred carbon source in the medium) indicate that L. rhamnosus GG has a flexible and adaptable metabolism. This adaptability might provide a competitive advantage for L. rhamnosus GG in the host's GIT. Furthermore, expression of many genes encoding adhesion factors and secreted proteins with low molecular masses were increased over time during the growth of L. rhamnosus GG in whey medium (Fig. 5), with the highest expression in the stationary phase. The expression patterns of genes encoding mucus‐binding pili and secreted protein p40 differed from this general pattern (Fig. 5), having the highest expression values in the exponential phase. Like nutritional versatility, these adhesion and probiotic‐associated factors provide a competitive advantage for L. rhamnosus GG by promoting its survival and persistence in the GIT. At present, the number of probiotic‐associated factors of L. rhamnosus GG that has been identified is still limited which makes it impossible to draw conclusions about the optimal harvesting phase for this probiotic bacterium. However, as soon as the key mediators of probiotic traits have been identified, the results presented here together with future studies involving growth conditions mimicking those in the GIT will be instrumental for these purposes.

Bottom Line: Of the significantly differentially produced proteins, 61 were associated with alterations at the transcript level.The most remarkable growth phase-dependent changes occurred during the transition from the exponential to the stationary growth phase and were associated with the shift from glucose fermentation to galactose utilization and the transition from homolactic to mixed acid fermentation.Furthermore, several genes encoding proteins proposed to promote the survival and persistence of L. rhamnosus GG in the host and proteins that directly contribute to human health showed temporal changes in expression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development, Valio Ltd, Helsinki, Finland.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus